5 dangerous things you should let your kids do (video)

Picture 1-137 Gever Tulley is the founder of the Tinkering School, "a summer program which aims to help kids learn how to build the things that they think of." In March 2007 he spoke at TED about five dangerous things you should let your kids do. It's inspiring. Link

16

  1. I found it interesting that the first clip he shows has kids using power tools with no safety glasses. Guess losing an eye is just going to be a lesson…

  2. This is a great title for a great video, though you have think about it and not walk away from it with the face value of danger.

  3. My kid is allowed to drill holes in wood without safety goggles, in case I forget to sign that waiver.

  4. 5 dangerous things you should let your kids do:

    1. play with fire
    2. own a pocket knife
    3. throw a spear
    4. deconstruct appliances
    5. break the DMCA
    6. drive a car

  5. I found it interesting that the first clip he shows has kids using power tools with no safety glasses.

    Congrats on totally missing the point!!

    On a side note: Did anyone notice his head? I looks like he has a plate or something, under the skin, in the top of his forehead :o)

  6. I wish his ‘summer camp’ had been around when I was a kid…I’d have far fewer scars from sneaking down to my dad’s tool bench (a bench full of tools I don’t think I ever saw him use) and figuring things out on my own. I was always, and still am, fascinated by tools…and sharp things…and throwing things (archery, darts, javelin, shot put)…and fire! I still go through a box of band-aids every few months. And, yeah, I’m a girl.

  7. — I found it interesting that the first clip he
    — shows has kids using power tools with no
    — safety glasses.

    — Congrats on totally missing the point!!

    See ya at the eye clinic.

    My girls (9 and 12) have used drills, routers, band saws, and more BUT they also learn that they only come with 10 fingers and 2 eyes and so on. And that there is equipment designed to let them safely use these machines.

    Let me know how it goes when you hand you kid a loaded gun and give no safety instructions.

  8. Firstly, thanks Rob from Denmark, for pointing out that seemingly dangerous tasks can become safe with practice. For the record, we do have safety goggles for the tinkerers when we are working with high-speed tools (electric screwdrivers don’t present much of a danger when used appropriately).

    And, just for the record, my head is lumpy but not plated.

    Finally, may I just say what a pleasure it is to get posted on my favorite blog. Hi Mom! Hi Jiro! Hi Julie!

  9. five social things for your kids to do;

    be there when siblings and cousins are born

    be there when grandma is dying and is buried

    be taken through the bad parts of town and see the junkies and the lost

    be a part of the weddings and celebrations (with all the embarrassing bits and family secrets)

    be parented by people who are there enough for them so they get to do the dangerous things themselves and live because there is a watchful eye right behind them

  10. Absolutely brilliant. It was only the other day that I was discussing with someone that we are raising a generation of unprepared, plastic-wrapped pansies who will be unexpectedly shocked into the real world. We’re sheltering our children from the most primitive form of learning: first hand cause and effect. You touch a hot stove, you burn yourself, you don’t do it again. You stick your tongue to the end of an adapter plugged into the wall, you shock yourself, you don’t do it again. You use a giant coloring book as a surf board on your aunt’s polished floor on Christmas at the age of 2, you break your leg (yeah, Merry Christmas to me). This is how we learn. By telling our children, “Don’t do this, don’t do that,” we only make them want it more. Adults are no different in that regards. If we allow our children to fall off their bike or stub their toes or burn themselves, we’re only preparing them for the real world.

  11. How truly delightful! One of my most treasured possessions is the pocket knife my dad gave me for my 5th birthday, he let me drive the car- I also got to shift for him while he was driving, and not only did I play with fire, we did the inevitable combustible experiments. He also encouraged me to roller skate in an ERA march. Politics and law was always a big discussion, and at a very young age I had a profound sense of my place in society based on the the things which were prohibited and the rights which were, in theory, protected. As a teen I really didn’t want to pay sales tax without having voice in my representation. As an adult I’m going through the reverse process and trying to show my dad how to break DCMA and the beauty of Creative Commons. For now, I’m loading the kids in the mini van and we’ll see how many of the 5 things we can do simultaneously, but we’ll wear goggles.

  12. I loved the talk, and a lot of these activities remind me of the things I did in girl scouts 15-20 years ago which made me into the artist/crafter/maker/thinker I am today. I really can’t wait to see the book!

    However, I got the feeling that he was talking to a very friendly audience. I hope that his book backs up the assertions that we makers understand so well with more hard evidence!

    Because I know these parents of the entitled precious children that need to be wrapped in bubble wrap– they’re fierce idiots who accuse people like us of nothing less than abuse for putting a pocket knife in the hands of a 6 year old, no matter how responsible we are.

  13. @eaddict

    See ya at the eye clinic.

    My girls (9 and 12) have used drills, routers, band saws, and more BUT they also learn that they only come with 10 fingers and 2 eyes and so on. And that there is equipment designed to let them safely use these machines.

    Let me know how it goes when you hand you kid a loaded gun and give no safety instructions.

    Ah, a loaded gun? Well kids should definitely be wearing safety glasses when handed a loaded gun. Then they’ll be OK.

    For the record, I’ve got a daughter aged 14. She wore safety glasses this (and every) New Years Eve, when watching and handling fireworks.

    She has played around with my cordless screwdriver, knives and hammers and stuff, without safety glasses, because I don’t regard them as necessary when using those tools.

    And she has always gotten instructions and played under supervision at first.

    And guess what: She still has 2 eyes and 10 fingers. And hardly any scars.

    Weapons are not freely available i Denmark where we live (thankfully) but a nice way to blow things out of proportions.

    Try watching the video again, and count the times you see a gun. Hint: It’s not one of the dangerous things your are encouraged to let your child try.

    The point is not to let your child try everything and not without instructions.

    I would have loved to send my daughter to Gever Tulley’s Tinkering School, even if he doesn’t have a plate in his forehead (wouldn’t that have been a great way to illustrate the ‘bad things do happen, if you are not careful’ part).

  14. @Rob

    eaddict said “no safety instructions”, not “no safety glasses” when referring to the loaded gun, which matches your “The point is…” comment, making your response kind of redundant.

    Overall, I think the idea is simply let your kids experiment, and keep an eye on them like responsible parent is supposed to.

  15. @Chef

    Actually eaddict wrote about safety glasses first and later he added in his second reply: “See ya at the eye clinic.”

    The loaded gun comment is just an attack by mentioning some absurd thing not in the video. I responded in the same absurd way.

Comments are closed.