Scan of 1979 book of the future

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18 Responses to “Scan of 1979 book of the future”

  1. noahz says:

    I had this book as a kid too. My favorite page was the guy stuck in the desert, summoning help with his Dick Tracy-type wrist phone-thingee. I thought it was the coolest and couldn’t wait until I could get mine one day.

    http://www.pointlessmuseum.com/museum/usbornebookofthefuture048.php

    Now it’s 2008 and I finally got a BlackBerry smart phone for work. Looking back at the picture of the guy in the desert, I now notice the caption right above it:

    If you were late to an appointment, it would be easy to let the other people know. The risto doubles as a watch too, continuously corrected by a time pulse from the satellite overhead. There would be few excuses for being late!

    Doh.

    Also: they forgot to mention that the risto can download video of skateboarding dogs from YouTube.

  2. dng says:

    I had another book that had a similar format, but it was like a military history book from the future that had spaceship paintings along with the history of their use in various interstellar conflicts. I have no idea what it was called or who did it, but the style of the art was very similar.

    Was it by perhaps Star Quest? (cover picture: http://www.pointlessmuseum.com/star%20quest.png )

    I could scan that in, if you want? (It might take a while, though, as I think my scanner is on the verge of dying

  3. ValuedRug says:

    Wow- thank you. I have been looking for this book forever. Pretty sure my mom got rid of it after I went to college. Pgs 38 and 39 had me believing in global warming from a very young age.

  4. Peter says:

    Hey, I had this book! I also had ones that I’m pretty sure were from the same publishers, one on ghosts, one on Space Travel, and one on UFOs and aliens. I probably still have at least one of them somewhere around here, although I’d have to dig around to find it.

  5. Bonnie says:

    That’s odd, I can’t seem to spot any of our future evil robot overlords in that image….

  6. Anonymous says:

    I also had this book, perhaps my mum still has it. I was telling a friend about the big screen TV in the book a few weeks ago. And now we have such things.

  7. Mindpowered says:

    http://www.pointlessmuseum.com/museum/usbornebookofthefuture042.php

    I always found that contrast to be particularly poignant.

  8. skepticalben says:

    I had forgotten about this book that I saw 26 years ago.

    This explains everything.

  9. mercermachine says:

    At first glance I read The Pointess Museum as the Pointless Museum.

    I think I need to up my prozac.

  10. vibrotronica says:

    Wow! That was a flash of unexpected recognition.I had that book when I was a little kid. I wore it out! I wonder what happened to it.

    I had another book that had a similar format, but it was like a military history book from the future that had spaceship paintings along with the history of their use in various interstellar conflicts. I have no idea what it was called or who did it, but the style of the art was very similar.

  11. Tomble says:

    Wonderful! I still have my copy, I loved that book so much as a kid.

    I now find the spoon bending and kirlian photography bit hilarious, though at the time Uri Geller was taken seriously. Ooo, automatic navigators for cars by 1990!

  12. scientiaobscura says:

    I think this book hit me at my Golden Age for science fiction.

    That being the age of 12.

  13. Prufrock451 says:

    I’m seeing the cowboy picture again. While this is hilarious, I’m sure it’s also a mistake.

    Still: AWESOME.

  14. mercermachine says:

    Gah! Now I see the Pointess Museum as the Pointless Museum. Must dial back the prozac!

  15. scientiaobscura says:

    Wow… I remember checking this (and some other books like it, same publisher I think) out from the local library over and over again. The Daedalus pages really stuck in my head. I now head to Google to see if this proposal has been carried forward in any fashion.

    This was the future I grew up with.

  16. Jonathan Badger says:

    I now find the spoon bending and kirlian photography bit hilarious, though at the time Uri Geller was taken seriously

    Yes, Usborne published a number of rather weird “non-fiction” books for children in the 1970s. I had the one about ghosts — it was very similar to the future one with lots of pretty pictures. The thing is, reading it, a kid would think that ghosts were a perfectly normal research subject and being a paranormal investigator was as a normal an occupation as being a paleontologist or something.

  17. scientiaobscura says:

    @#3 VIBROTRONICA

    Terran Trade Authority Handbook
    Great Space Battles
    by Stewart Cowley and Charles Herridge

    It’s out there, still.

  18. vibrotronica says:

    Yes, that’s it! Thank you, scientiaobscura.

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