Furniture from factory waste

Discuss

22 Responses to “Furniture from factory waste”

  1. clueless in brooklyn says:

    Good chair for a dainty Dane, but I’d be afraid to sit on it myself.

    - – -

    Wikipedia calls them both matryoshka doll or Babooshka doll.

  2. kaffee says:

    RE #1, would be curious to see the real differences between the two, as what I often see referred to is often stated as “a.k.a” ( babooshka, also known as matryoshka dools…”, e.g.). Thanks for the comment.

    As for the pieces in the picture above: interesting patterns from the different types of wood; interesting concept.

  3. OM says:

    “Wikipedia calls them both matryoshka doll or Babooshka doll.”

    …Most Russians born after the end of the Cold War refer to them exclusively these days as “Babooshkas” simply because that’s how they’ve been referred to in all areas outside of the Iron Curtain.

    …Referring to the lamp depicted in the photo, tho, usually when you see scrap wood products cobbled together into objects, it’s *very* rare to see them result in anything that has curvature to it. They’re usually angular simply out of convenience. About the only exception I can name off the top of my head was an art exhibit I’d seen about 30-35 years ago, where this local hippie’s specialty was going to home construction sites – especially the really top-dollar “planned communities” out on the outskirts of town – and scavenging up as many different forms of wood, paneling, plastics, tiling (floor and bathroom), countertop formicals, and even bathroom glass, epoxying them together into bricks, and then carving and sanding them into sculptures. The effect was something akin to what you see in the lamp above, with a rather interesting stratification to the finished product.

  4. celse7en says:

    I don’t know how much of a dork I am, but all I am seeing is the furniture from MySims on the Wii (particularly since later in the game, you have to build simple things out of dozens and dozens of parts).

    Dork dork dork.

  5. anthony says:

    ба́бушка
    babushka
    “babooshka” is a Kate Bush thing.
    But of course I am just bored, and in no way an expert.
    Na zdrowie!

  6. anthony says:

    The stuff is pretty inspiring. It looks like she laminated the bits and pieces and then coaxed them into shape?

  7. Takuan says:

    unless these were cured under microwaves and extreme pressure, I wouldn’t expect them to last long.

  8. AirPillo says:

    #6:
    “The stuff is pretty inspiring. It looks like she laminated the bits and pieces and then coaxed them into shape? ”

    Looks like it, which means it is by no means a new concept per se, though a cool one nonetheless. It’s pretty common for students in a high school wood shop class to do the same thing in order to make, for example, a checkerboard or a cutting board. One laminates many blocks of what can either be useful stock or discarded scraps, then machine it into a finished, useful surface.

    It’s also a technique I’ve seen used to build unique looking kitchen countertops, where a business will take lumber that’s either scrap or ill-suited to construction or traditional woodworking, dice it up, make a laminate mass, and machine it into very nice, smooth, intricately patterned countertops which, sadly, can be very expensive despite their inexpensive materials because they’re very labor-intensive to manufacture.

  9. anthony says:

    What’s long nowadays? Ikea furniture is made from sawdust and gram cracker as far as I can tell.
    I admit I don’t know enough about joining unlike species of wood together, but when you glue properly the bond can be stronger than the original solid piece.

  10. anthony says:

    “It’s also a technique I’ve seen used to build unique looking kitchen countertops, where a business will take lumber that’s either scrap or ill-suited to construction or traditional woodworking, dice it up, make a laminate mass, and machine it into very nice, smooth, intricately patterned countertops”

    Now you talkin’! I would love to do that. But how does one clamp a mass of wood blocks together? Pressure has to be applied in two directions or you get a permanent hump in the thing.

  11. Mim says:

    @#10 – You can clamp a mass of wood blocks together by framing them with larger pieces of wood that are clamped together. (Did it in grade 8 wood shop.)

  12. anthony says:

    Thanks Mim!
    I was thinking this would be hard to do with a countertop shape, but also I should have googled for an answer…
    I feel like a 7th grader.

  13. eti says:

    “…which fit inside each other like babooshka dolls.”

    Except the dolls are all the same design, just different sizes.

  14. AmyHunting says:

    Hello everyone,

    the wood is all untreated, no laminates involved. The small off-cuts were glued and joined with wood dowels and they are surprisingly strong. As far as the pattern on the lamps: they came from sawing a 40 cm x 40 cm x 40 cm of massive block of wood (made of tiny pieces of wood and plywood) on a band saw at a 80 degree angle. If you scroll down here you can see the pattern from the wood closer:

    http://www.amyhunting.com/Amy%20Hunting/Babooshka.html

    Amy

  15. Takuan says:

    dowelled??? Amy: you are a complete loon: I salute you! (that’s what I call dedication!)

  16. Takuan says:

    100 wonderful points by the way

  17. AmyHunting says:

    My fingers still hurt!

  18. bcsizemo says:

    Personally it that chair doesn’t look strong. There are no stringers or cross braces on the legs. My 200+ lb butt, over my life time, would surely crack those legs.

    A cheaper economical greener way to make furniture sure, I’ll give it that. But, less wasteful, I would doubt that. The solid wood mission style chairs in my living room are going to out live me. Sure they were expensive, but that’s also a one time investment. Not popping down to Rooms to Go every 5 years or so to pickup a new chair because this one is falling apart.

    I guess it’s just how you look at things.

    Like my friend said, we need some of that nanite technology in a glue like fashion. Squeeze a little on some scrap wood, and the nanites (sp?) would bond the wood fiber back together. Of course by that time in history we will have self healing houses and cured cancer.

  19. Marcus Hyatt says:

    The idea of randomness is in itself portentous in good hands.
    re-imagining waste has it’s own glory for a variety of reasons.

    I applaud how the pastiche of materials enlivens the form of these objects. The evolution of ideas still enthralls. Keep on.

    These pieces parallel the work of Piet Hein Eek, to me, in that spirit.

    Our era, our design DNA matrix refined; a pleasure to watch unfold.

  20. DeuceMojo says:

    My 1-year-old son eats White Castle and why not, I say, the stuff is absolutely delicious.

  21. wil9000 says:

    I assume you mean matryoshka dolls. Easy mistake to make.
    xxoo,
    Wil

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