Japanese wives wanting a divorce hire professional seducers

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32 Responses to “Japanese wives wanting a divorce hire professional seducers”

  1. Sean Grimm says:

    I find it pretty horrible that the one sex worker, that’s what they are even if they pretend to have more of a relationship, tells her boyfriend she’s a secretary. No one in a relationship wants to just ‘find out’ that their partner has been having sexual intercourse with other people and in these cases actual relationships too, even if they are faked on her part. There is a kind of moral ambiguity and naiveté involved since her opinion of the wife-beating husband was, “He’s not so bad.”

    I have no sympathy for the abusive husband but the other instances of hiring people to manipulate someone back into a relationship or break them up seems horrible. That kind of desperation is straight out of a bad romantic comedy film. Is this really a service people need to have?

  2. Jarvik7 says:

    Why do people in comments keep thinking this is a service to test their partner’s fidelity? They WANT the partner to cheat, get evidence, and use it in divorce court.

  3. spazzm says:

    This is another reason why one should, if at all possible, avoid getting married.

  4. minamisan says:

    I’m there all the time. It is about the least seedy place in Tokyo (okay, save Ginza) that I can think of. It’s upper-middle-class and middle-aged.

    you don’t get out enough. let me take you through Kabukicho sometime.

  5. 7eagle14 says:

    I remember seeing this same thing on Fox a number of years ago. Of course the TV show was sponsoring it but they claimed that there was a specific type of agency for wives to hire a pretty young thing to “test” their husbands fidelity. That the idea has reached/developed in Japan too should be no real surprise.

  6. Daemon says:

    Not really news. I’m positive I’ve heard about the exact same sort of company operating in the US or Canada years ago.

  7. w000t says:

    This really puts the provocateur back in agents provocateurs.

  8. Takuan says:

    provocateuse

  9. airshowfan says:

    Wow. This is romantic comedy GOLD.

    – Seductress falls in love with man she is hired to seduce…

    No, too obvious.

    – Woman suspects the husband of cheating and hires a seductress, but it turns out the seductress is already the mistress, and the seductress/mistress and the husband then conspire to hide the husband’s cheating from the wife…

    No, too complicated.

    – Boyfriend finds out that his girlfriend is a seductress when she is hired to seduce his best friend, and the best friend starts telling the boyfriend about his new mistress…

    No, too dramatic.

    – In a future of humaniform robots…

    Nah, getting off-track.

    – One girl works as a seductress, and has a twin sister who is nice and sweet and lovable and who is dating a nice guy, but then one day the nice guy sees the twin doing her thing… you get the idea.

  10. Anonymous says:

    I too would like to refute the notion that Ikebukero is seedy. Not only is it not seedy, never have I ever even remotely heard it being referred to as thus by anyone. Where did the author of the otherwise good article get this idea from?

    Itabashi resident (neighbouring Ikebukero)

  11. bshock says:

    This story is sad in so many ways.

    It’s sad that two people allow an unpleasant marriage to go on too long.

    It’s sad that a woman has to go to such lengths to separate herself from a husband she despises.

    And it’s sad that a 40-year-old man can be so desperate and delusional that he would accept the unsolicited attention of a young woman. Look in the mirror, guy — you’re ugly. Listen to what you say when you talk — you’re obnoxious. Look at what you do from day to day — you’re boring.

    As an ugly, obnoxious, boring 40-something male, I know from whence I speak.

    Your life may be pointless, but don’t make it a parody by failing to know yourself a little better.

  12. Opspin says:

    So let me get this straight, husband beats wife, wife spends life savings to hire 20y/o insanely hot seductress to fuck husbands brains out for three or four months?

    Wasn’t this a Futurama Episode? Bendless Love

  13. aimless says:

    @#8

    Here’s another article where people are secretly in the sex trade: http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1815509,00.html

    I don’t know if it’s common in Japan, but it doesn’t look uncommon.

  14. Takuan says:

    not many salarimen left, but the Japanese economy still runs on male sacrifice.

  15. asuffield says:

    What’s so wrong with the Japanese legal system that a beaten woman thinks she needs to incite her husband to infidelity in order to secure a divorce?

    A no-fault Japanese divorce requires the division of property between the people to be settled before the divorce can be completed. There are three ways this can work out:

    (a) Both of you agree on what to do. Sign the papers and it’s over in an afternoon.

    (b) You disagree but don’t care enough to argue. The other person gets everything and you walk away. Over in a week.

    (c) You want your half of the stuff and you don’t agree on exactly what that is. The court has to decide what is an equitable division of property. You will spend the next 20 years in court debating the monetary value of every single pencil in your possession, while your lawyers produce hour-long presentations on the current state of the pencil industry. They are nothing if not meticulous, and if the lawyers are particularly good then it will drag on long enough for one of the participants to die, so they can start all over again with the inheritance dispute. Nobody but the lawyers really likes this option.

    It’s just so much easier to do a divorce for cause. Prove he’s cheating and you walk away with everything. As usual, the problem is that people get greedy when their sense of entitlement gets riled up.

    • Antinous says:

      It gets more complicated. To be a Japanese citizen, you have to be in the Family Register, which isn’t much different from the feudal system. Women who get divorced while pregnant, then remarry, occasionally fall into a paperwork crack that leaves the baby as a non-person. They’re just getting it sorted out. In the meantime, a fair number of ethnic Japanese, Japan-born people have never been fully benefited members of society.

  16. Synerjizzm says:

    Ikebukero’s not that seedy…

  17. Anonymous says:

    #8 Sean you point out that the seductresses are sex workers. Could this be a bizarrely clever way to hire a prostitute ? Impersonating a concerned party, I hire someone to seduce.. me. Maybe I have not actually paid for the sex, but for the evidence that I am cheating on my significant other. The agent goes through the effort of striking up some sort of relationship with me.

  18. minamisan says:

    I too would like to refute the notion that Ikebukero is seedy. Not only is it not seedy, never have I ever even remotely heard it being referred to as thus by anyone. Where did the author of the otherwise good article get this idea from?

    Itabashi resident (neighbouring Ikebukero)

    hey, you spelled “Ikebukuro” wrong. c’mon, you’re only one stop past it :)

    the JT article writer did say it was “faintly seedy” and i’d have to agree. hardly seedy at all by non-Japan standards but definitely a tad grungey compared to the rest of Tokyo. it’s also one of the only places in the city i’ve been approached by street hookers during my 4AM staggers.

    OR maybe they weren’t really hookers? hmm… i wonder if my wife is reading this?

  19. OLAF9000 says:

    this is sooo wrong, its not even worth being entertained by it. anyone remember the infamous tv show cheaters? well at least they didnt resort to entrampment but still it could of easily headed in that direction.

  20. Gloria says:

    Hm. What’s so wrong with the Japanese legal system that a beaten woman thinks she needs to incite her husband to infidelity in order to secure a divorce?

    “[Kyoko] works on four or five [clients] at a time, which means she could be having sex with all of them.”

    If I were her boyfriend, I’d sure like to know that.

  21. dculberson says:

    And if the guy doesn’t fall for the seductress, how sad and broken will the woman feel since she knows she didn’t trust him as much as he deserved? Oh, fate, you are so cruel.

  22. Jarvik7 says:

    @1 It’s hard to get a divorce in Japan regardless of the circumstances if the partner (man OR woman) is not willing to sign the papers. Usually it takes years of mediation.

  23. Kyle Armbruster says:

    …Ikebukuro, the home of the main branches of both the fairly upscale Seibu and Tobu department stores… Is seedy?

    I’m there all the time. It is about the least seedy place in Tokyo (okay, save Ginza) that I can think of. It’s upper-middle-class and middle-aged.

    I think I’m actually offended by this. The writer seems to have just slapped on a label to enhance the setting for the readers who have no idea what area of town he’s talking about.

  24. Takuan says:

    in Japan,if you really,really hate someone, if you wish them more than slowly,painfully dead, if roasting their children before their eyes and making them eat the flesh is not enough, if you are really,really,really pissed: sue. There is nothing fouler than a Japanese lawsuit. Nothing longer,nothing more expensive, nothing more ultimately vile and empty. That is why the Yakuza exist and that is why they have 30,000 lawyers in all Japan (compared to 1,000,000 in America). People tend to be more responsible and work things out.

  25. Maddy says:

    my pal, Paul Cullum wrote about these American private eyes, who do the same thing — “Catch and Release” — as a preventative measure (I thought the japanese were more into preventative medicine!)

    “And then there are their CheckMate and CheckDate services, wherein a special women’s auxiliary of ex-Playmates called the Backstreet Babes will test-drive the fidelity of a client’s husband, boyfriend or potential date by showing up at the target’s favorite bar and making themselves available for proposition — a program they unofficially refer to as “Catch and Release.”

    part of a larger article on the dudes:

    http://www.laweekly.com/general/features/watching-the-detectives/3989/

  26. paulm says:

    Just one more disadvantage of a nation with tight handgun restrictions.

  27. minamisan says:

    it’s a great idea, but I have trouble believing it’s new or even japanese. didn’t this kind of thing go on for years in Western countries before no-fault divorce became the norm?

  28. awake7two says:

    Wonderful article. I wonder why so little comments tho…

    All the special agents are in relationships themselves:

    “Takashi has been doing this job for five years. His wife doesn’t like it, ‘but the salary is high, so she doesn’t complain”.”

    “She can earn up to £5,000 a month, has her own apartment and a boyfriend who thinks she’s a secretary.”

    It may turn out their significant other may call ACYours and GNC to break the relationship up.

    They also bring couples together. What happens they want to break up hire the company, suceeds, lose touch, and one of them hires the company back to get back together again…

    So complicated to force fate.

  29. deckard68 says:

    Don’t give the producers of Dateline: Predator more ideas.

  30. Takuan says:

    s’ok, you can always stab a lawyer to death

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