Nick Reynolds, RIP


Nick Reynolds of the Kingston Trio died yesterday at age 75. Kingston Trio's Nick Reynolds, 75, dies in San Diego

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  1. Scotch and soda, mud in your eye
    Baby do I feel high
    Oh me oh my do I feel high

    Dry martini, jigger of gin
    Oh what a spell you’ve got me in
    Oh my, do I feel high

    People won’t believe me, they’ll think that I’m just braggin’
    But I could feel the way I do
    And still be on the wagon.

    All I need is one of your smiles, sunshine of your eye
    Oh me oh my do I feel higher than a kite can fly
    Give me lovin’, baby, I feel high.

    Oh, people won’t believe me, they’ll think that I’m just braggin’
    But I could feel the way I do
    And still be on the wagon.

    All I need is one of your smiles, sunshine of your eyes
    Oh me oh my do I feel higher than a kite can fly
    Give me lovin’, baby I feel high.

  2. The Kingston Trio was one of the first music groups I discovered as a kid in the ’60’s great music….

    The video posted above is a bit strange as an example…

    Here’s a link to Scotch and Soda from last year….

    I’m going to miss Nick….

  3. In the words of Martin Mull:

    “remember the folk music scare of the ’60s?”–“that shit almost caught on!”

  4. I know the concept of “selling out” was a bit different back then, but geez – couldn’t we find a better example?

    Loved the Kingston Trio – my dad played them all growing up!

  5. Having never really heard them before seeing the vids posted here. I gotta say I’m baffled. It’s like A Mighty Wind come to life. Beyond awful.

  6. It’s hard to imagine today that these guys were so
    popular on college campus in person as performers
    and on vinyl.Really safe and tepid music.
    As a teenager in the 1950’s this sort of folk music ala the Newport Folk Music events was sort of rebellious and subversive. Anyway we listened to Jazz,it was our poetry and primal scream.

  7. Many of the comments here are incredibly misinformed. The Kingston Trio were a seminal force in popular music and a bridge which allowed much of the great music that followed them to exist. I suppose it’s easy to dismiss them now, after 50 years of pop music evolution. But make no mistake, they were great, they were fun and they were intelligent-as good as it got between Elvis in the army and the Beatle’s arrival. And at the risk of sounding misinformed myself, they were infinitely preferrable to the pretentious, insufferable, BEYOND AWFUL “jazz” of the period.

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