Insectoid robot with router bit head carves a human face in high density foam

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22 Responses to “Insectoid robot with router bit head carves a human face in high density foam”

  1. urza9814 says:

    “As far as having it walk and then continue cutting… I think you’d need either optical or force feedback so it could orient itself from the edges of the first cut, and even then you’d have issues of designing a pattern which leaves it stable places to stand. But it’d be fun to attempt.”

    I think it could easily figure out where to stand while cutting the pattern – just stand behind where you’ve cut, just as if you’re mopping a floor, you stand behind where you’ve mopped.

    As for orienting itself…perhaps you could set up towers on each side of the material you’re cutting to act as a sort of miniature GPS system. Have the towers send out IR or radio or some form of beacon and it could determine it’s position based on timing or signal strength. Or even erect a wall around the area to be cut and simply put a couple IR range finders on the robot so it can detect it’s distance from the walls.

    Of course, any kind of system like that would be _extremely_ slow…but it’d be quite interesting, and if you have the time but not the money, it’d be a decent alternative to an expensive CNC machine for large projects. Heck, start it up before you go to work, maybe it’ll be done when you get home. Or by the weekend.

  2. adralien says:

    -very- cool… having recently gotten my first (used) CNC machine, I can dig this.

    If you could get good accelerometers or some other kind of positioning, the robot could walk over a 4×8 sheet of ply and CNC out holes all over. Tank treads might be a better style for moving while cutting though.

    Being able to scale to almost any size could make a commercial version of this less expensive than a massive CNC router table.

  3. fnc says:

    In the coming robocalypse they’ll probably just be carving human faces.

  4. Anonymous says:

    Looks like Brian Eno to me.

  5. Takuan says:

    sculpture? Pah! Imagine a motorized tongue. Mammalian priorities – so predictable.

  6. unklstuart says:

    Beware of the sound. This is like a spear through your head. But does remind me that I need to go to the dentist.

  7. Anonymous says:

    Think of the size of the bot that was used to do the one on mars! And NASA say Phoenix may be dead. I’m scared.

  8. zorlack says:

    Me and a friend recently shot some footage of our bot carving a monster out of high density foam. Its a lot of fun. http://www.flickr.com/photos/thereisanothermoei/2936668868/

    Bottom Line: Timelapse CNC = Awesome. Bonus points if it involves robot spiders.

  9. technogeek says:

    Flagged the spammer.

    I’m sorta impressed; I didn’t know the servos on the bug-bots were that precise. I presume the cutting pattern was designed to limit the hysteresis error from flexibility/slop in the system. (I did notice that they gave it notches to stand in so cutting force wouldn’t move the whole bot.)

    I’m curious about what material they were cutting in. It took details pretty well.

    As far as having it walk and then continue cutting… I think you’d need either optical or force feedback so it could orient itself from the edges of the first cut, and even then you’d have issues of designing a pattern which leaves it stable places to stand. But it’d be fun to attempt.

  10. arkizzle says:

    Very impressive! Really, really nice. Well done Matt!

  11. badger500 says:

    It jumps from 7 min to about 16 min and only then is when the actual face is carved. What is shown is the robot polishing the edges. The least interesting part, of course.

    Also, the right front foot slips around 2:19 into it, and I’m surprised that with the likelihood of slipping there wouldn’t be loss of registration of the robot’s position and so the face would not come out right every time–I’d need to know more about how it works.

  12. FrankenPengie says:

    You know those windshield-washers in New York? One day your gal is going to be chatting with a friend.

    “Yeah, I kinda wish my nose was a little thinner here and didn’t have this bump.”

    Then a big metal bug is going to run up and climb up to her face. Thirty eight minutes later some guy missing half his teeth is going to say, “That’ll be fifty bucks lady”.

  13. adralien says:

    URZA9814 and TECHNOGEEK

    I think using accelerometers you would have two, one at the front of the robot, and one at the rear… if the robot spins each accelerometer would register a different motion, giving you the direction of the bot. Since you know the direction and distance traveled you know the tool location. As math books always say “the solution is left to the reader”.

    I was thinking about it a bit more, and I think the “easiest” way to do a large bot that mimics a gantry/router CNC would be two tracked bots linked by a more conventional gantry… you have your rigidity and your Y axis easily, and the bots drive for the X.

    I would love to see a hexapod climbing over an emerging workpiece though.

  14. shmengie says:

    38 minutes? totally lame. i could knock that out in 37 minutes, easy.

  15. soupisgoodfood says:

    technogeek: I think they are digital servos, which are very powerful and precise compared to normal analogue servos. That would also explain all the high-pitch buzzing that isn’t the drill bit.

  16. Anonymous says:

    I foresee a robotic version of Sandkings in the near future.

  17. ilovefood says:

    reminds me of Han Solo in carbonite

  18. star35 says:

    I wish the camera had pulled back to reveal the face of Elvis emerging from the dust.

  19. Anonymous says:

    “Insectoid robot with router bit head carves a human face”

    That’s a short story right there.

  20. robulus says:

    Hmmmmm… a bit rough here… just let me clear away the dust and… OH GOD THE PAIN!!!! STOP PLEASE MAKE IT STOP!!! MY FINGERS MY FINGERS!!!!!

  21. IWood says:

    When the high density foam revolution comes, insectoid robots will be the first against the wall, man!

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