U.S. household debt down for first time since feds started tracking it in 1952

The Wall Street Journal reports that U.S. citizens have suddenly become quite thrifty.
200901061042 Usually, frugality is good for individuals and for the economy. Savings serve as a reservoir of capital that can be used to finance investment, which helps raise a nation's standard of living. But in a recession, increased saving -- or its flip side, decreased spending -- can exacerbate the economy's woes. It's what economists call the "paradox of thrift."

U.S. household debt, which has been growing steadily since the Federal Reserve began tracking it in 1952, declined for the first time in the third quarter of 2008. In the same quarter, U.S. consumer spending growth declined for the first time in 17 years.

Hard-Hit Families Finally Start Saving, Aggravating Nation's Economic Woes