UK newspaper headlines of Sept 12, 2001

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47 Responses to “UK newspaper headlines of Sept 12, 2001”

  1. WarEagle says:

    “It shouldn’t have changed anything much. It was best ignored, as much as possible.”

    so it could happen again? invading Iraq wasn’t the answer of course, but ignore it?

    impossible.

  2. BritSwedeGuy says:

    The USA and the UK definitely changed for the worse, this gave the control-freaks just the excuse that they needed.
    I was in a bar in Stockholm (Sweden) at the time, the general reaction was ‘They (the US) had it coming’.
    The US may have elected Obama but their continued support for Israel looks increasingly bad to most of the rest of the world, so don’t pat yourselves on the back just yet.

  3. samu says:

    All the headlines just seem pathetically inadequate; it’s a shame none of them had the bollocks to go without one.

  4. raettig says:

    I thought that the most beautiful headline came from The Onion: “Holy Fucking Shit”. The article accompanying it was funny, nuanced, full of pathos, and bang on the nose. Sadly I can’t seem to find that article online any more.

  5. arkizzle says:

    WarEagle,

    Not ignore, as in: “let’s pretend it didn’t happen”, but ignore as in: “lets not change the entire security apparatus of the US and make normal citizens criminals in going about their everyday lives”.

    Seems fair.

  6. arkizzle says:

    Raettig, here’s a Wayback Machine version, sans headline: http://web.archive.org/web/20010927221145/www.theonion.com/onion3734/index.html

    It was Volume 37, Issue 34 / 26 September 2001

  7. Ugly Canuck says:

    Cui bono?
    Res ipsa loquitor.

  8. Jeremy Hill says:

    @#25

    On behalf of the 3000+ innocent people that died, I would like to say “Screw you.”

    No one “deserved” that. No one.

  9. Antinous / Moderator says:

    Jeremy,

    You’ve put quotation marks around ‘deserved’. But the comment to which you’re referring doesn’t use that word.

  10. celia says:

    I was in London on vacation, at the British Museum. I remember half-hearing a news broadcast while in a souvenir shop as we wandered up the street and thinking it was a joke between DJs. We came out of the store, and the newspaper sandwich boards had black and white covers with horrifying pictures on them, and I realized it wasn’t a joke.

    The strangest thing was that 5 or so years later, the next time I was by myself in a museum, looking at Greek and Roman stuff, same as I had been on 9/11, I nearly had a panic attack that when I came out the world would have changed itself again.

  11. gnosis says:

    @ #11 Zuzu – Wow! I thought I had scraped every corner of 9/11 conspiracy stuff and had never heard of this. That is insane – thanks!

  12. minTphresh says:

    all i could think, as i watched the second plane smak into the tower was: cia. whether or not that was accurate will be for another generation to judge. the media has had a hard time convincing me otherwise, especially when many of the supposed “hijackers” turn up alive in other countries.

  13. zuzu says:

    “It shouldn’t have changed anything much. It was best ignored, as much as possible.” so it could happen again? invading Iraq wasn’t the answer of course, but ignore it? impossible.

    Everything that’s been done only makes it worse. Stoicism is the best response.

    There will always be a few crazy* determined people in the world, and there’s no way to stop them without creating a prison planet.

    So get over it. Shit happens.

    *They’re actually crazy pissed at having a US Military occupational presence at all in the Middle East. I wouldn’t be happy if China kept permanent military bases and standing armies in the USA either.

  14. janai says:

    Still my favorite headline: the San Francisco Chronicle declaring, “BASTARDS!”

    At least it was succinct.

  15. janai says:

    (Oh, sorry — looks like it was the Examiner. Just found a copy in the links above. Nothing to see here, move along… ;)

  16. zuzu says:

    Wow! I thought I had scraped every corner of 9/11 conspiracy stuff and had never heard of this.

    It’s certainly convenient for the military-banking complex to have a new faceless enemy to shepherd the population against. I forget, are we at war with Eurasia or Eastasia?

    But at the same time, detonating a backpack nuke in NYC is also certainly plausible, and if it happened now you could go back and point to the pilot episode of Chris Carter’s Harsh Realm too. Hindsight is 20/20.

    The only realistic way out to preserve the safety of our freedoms is to stop pissing people off in the world by stopping acting like a goddamn empire, er, “superpower”.

    “An armed society is a polite society,” and fission bombs are a half-century old technology. Assume that anyone could build and detonate an atomic weapon, and govern accordingly (i.e. very lightly).

  17. zuzu says:

    all i could think, as i watched the second plane smak into the tower was: cia. whether or not that was accurate will be for another generation to judge.

    blowback

    c.f. Why We Fight by Eugene Jarecki

    A vital element in keeping the peace is our military establishment. Our arms must be mighty, ready for instant action, so that no potential aggressor may be tempted to risk his own destruction… This conjunction of an immense military establishment and a large arms industry is new in the American experience. The total influence — economic, political, even spiritual — is felt in every city, every statehouse, every office of the federal government. We recognize the imperative need for this development. Yet we must not fail to comprehend its grave implications. Our toil, resources and livelihood are all involved; so is the very structure of our society. In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist. We must never let the weight of this combination endanger our liberties or democratic processes. We should take nothing for granted. Only an alert and knowledgeable citizenry can compel the proper meshing of the huge industrial and military machinery of defense with our peaceful methods and goals so that security and liberty may prosper together.

    – Dwight D. Eisenhower, Farewell Address to the Nation on January 17, 1961.

  18. arkizzle says:

    Jeremy, also, besides never saying ‘deserved’, s/he never said it was his/her opinion.

    Frankly, in the heat of the moment, before the human side of the tragedy set in, a lot of the world thought “they had it coming”. Or “wow, someone hit back”.

    America’s foreign policy actions (in many different places) have invited retaliation for decades. Then it happened.

    Regardless of the motivations behind 9/11, there was that underlying thought in many places.

  19. Xopher says:

    I was busy trying to figure out which of my friends and coworkers were still alive, and trying to find a way to tell them I was. Also retrieving my friends’ daughter from school, when neither of her parents could get to Hoboken. Trying to breathe. Ultimately watching SciFi Channel, the only one I could find without a crawl about the attack.

    Worst birthday I ever had, and I hope that will remain so throughout my life.

  20. Eutychus says:

    It’s interesting to see the tabloid reaction compared to the broadsheets

    I think the most intelligent and perceptive headline of the bunch is that of the Sun: “day that changed the world”. If memory serves, that or something very like it was the headline on the next issue of the Economist’s front page, too.

  21. chezzo says:

    Just for the Americans:

    Tabloids = Mirror, Star, Mail, Sun, Express

    Broadsheets = FT, Independent, Guardian, Telegraph, Times (although that’s pushing it a bit nowadays…)

  22. joncro says:

    Does anyone still think that it did change the world?

    America changed a little, started realising they do have a place in a wider world; but really looking back it seems that it’s been business as usual since then.

  23. george57l says:

    Yes it did change the world on an everyday basis for many people. Three little letters: T S A.

    And photographers in public places, and anyone with an aversion to a “papers please” society…

  24. lumpi says:

    I find it interesting that nearly all of them have the word “WAR” in the title.

    My first thoughts when I saw the pictures, back in 2001, were: “Don’t allow those lunatics to turn this into a political message. Do not turn this in a ‘war’.”

    Essentially, a bunch of lunatics, a religious sect, stole a bunch of airplanes and killed many people. That’s not a war. There is no country behind this.

    It took American politics 8 years to realize it. They were fighting a war against insanity. It’s the worst abuse of a word I can think of.

  25. acx99 says:

    The day that broke the world

  26. urshrew says:

    I kept two covers. One was the actual regional newspaper for that day, which of course came out before anyone knew what was going on and the other was the newspaper the day after which had similar headlines to the one above. It works as a powerful contrast.

  27. zuzu says:

    America changed a little, started realising they do have a place in a wider world; but really looking back it seems that it’s been business as usual since then.

    The USA became approximately twice as fascist as a result.

    But the criminal acts were nothing new in the global sense. However, the belief by Americans that it was a “game changer” or “9/11 changed everything” or “in a post-9/11 world” is what allowed the actual changes creeping towards a police state to occur.

    Yes it did change the world on an everyday basis for many people. Three little letters: T S A.

    Homeland Security and the USAPATRIOT Act are far more terrifying.

  28. zuzu says:

    My first thoughts when I saw the pictures, back in 2001, were: “Don’t allow those lunatics to turn this into a political message. Do not turn this in a ‘war’.”

    My first thought was, “this is just like the pilot episode of The Lone Gunmen” that aired several months earlier.

  29. karengeier says:

    the mail seems quite tame. after all they did once famously endorse hitler.

  30. MrWeeble says:

    I half expected to see the Daily Express having Diana on the cover as per bloody usual

  31. Xopher says:

    I meant on 9/11 itself. The next day headlines…I didn’t really look.

  32. Craigger1 says:

    Great post!

    It’s always interesting to see how other countries “tell the story”.
    I did something similar when Obama won the election.
    I created a slide show of the world’s headlines.
    It can be viewed here:

    http://activerain.com/blogsview/775104/History-Was-Made-Last-NightWhat-Does-the-Rest-of-the-World-Think-A-Pictorial-View-of-the-Worlds-Headlines

  33. arkizzle says:

    ..I hope that will remain so throughout my life.

    Amen to that.

  34. BubblesUp says:

    Seven years later, this still brings tears to my eyes. For several years, I passed through the World Trade every workday.

    And to see the children in my town whose parents were killed that day makes me so very frustrated (in more ways than one).

    At the time, what other parts of the world thought or said didn’t occur to me. We were all wrapped up in the families and the children (affected and not).

    Thank you for posting this. It’s a great reminder of many, many things.

  35. padster123 says:

    @ #7 posted by lumpi

    You’re exactly right.

    It shouldn’t have changed anything much. It was best ignored, as much as possible. As out-of-the-blue terrorist attacks have to be ignored in other places in the world. It could have been of little more global significance than outrages perpetrated by nutjobs from the Unabomber to McVeigh, the IRA, the Soho nailbomber, Chechen separatists, the latest idiot to get guns and go into a school.

    But – thanks to the cynicism of the neo-cons, it was turned into an international outrage industry, and a cash machine for the military-industrial complex. And we all had a load of our time and money wasted.

    And a lot of people in Iraq died for no reason.

  36. Ernunnos says:

    “Suppose they gave a war and nobody came? Why then, the war would come to you!” – Brecht.

    Lot of people in denial, all through the ’90s. And a lot of people in denial still. But just because it doesn’t meet your definition or standards for what constitutes a war doesn’t mean the other side is so limited. It meets their definition, and that’s what matters.

  37. Anonymous says:

    I think the SF Examiner said it best…

    BASTARDS!

    [url]http://www.newseum.org/todaysfrontpages/hr_archive.asp?fpVname=CA_SFE&ref_pge=gal&b_pge=1[/url]

  38. werdnagreb says:

    I don’t find it pleasant to look at these pictures. After being in NY during whole thing, losing some co-workers and friends in the towers. I used to work on the 60th floor of WTC2. But, that morning I had a dentist appointment and never made it to work.

    On the 12, I was hoping that such a horrible moment would change the US (and the rest of the world for the better). And for the next few months (in NY at least), it felt like it had. For a little while, you could smile at strangers on the street and they’d smile back. We were all going through really hard times together. And everyone was pulling together to help everyone else.

    But, unfortunately, these good feelings didn’t last and the US (and the world) changed for the worse.

  39. zuzu says:

    @17 Ernunnos

    The lethal delusion is your culture of fear and phantom menace.
    (We’re ending up like Terry Gilliam’s Brazil.)

    If only we could return to the relatively sane culture of the 1990s — after the fear-mongering of “Communism” but before the fear-mongering of “Terrorism”, when for one brief decade the “superpower” didn’t have “The Enemy” to distract its population with, and people started focusing on practical issues such as budget deficits and cutting back on military spending.

  40. BingoTheChimp says:

    @#1

    Interesting to see the Arizona Republic was on top of the story!

    http://www.newseum.org/todaysfrontpages/hr_archive.asp?fpVname=AZ_AR&ref_pge=gal&b_pge=1

  41. padster123 says:

    Personally, I found the Beslan school massacre much more horrifying. I can hardly bear to think of that. In comparison, 9/11 was warm and fluffy.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beslan_school_hostage_crisis

    How long did the front pages obsess over that? Not long.

    Terrorists: best ignored, *as much as possible*.

    Thatcher (!) said it very well:

    “Democratic nations must try to find ways to starve the terrorist and the hijacker of the oxygen of publicity on which they depend.”

  42. Tom Hale says:

    When I was able to get over my horror enough to think, revenge was the first thing I thought about on 09/11/2001.

    I know getting revenge is wrong and as in most wrong endeavors, we’ll be paying those consequences for a long time. Now the videos of 09/11/2001 just make me sad.

  43. kiltreiser says:

    “I half expected to see the Daily Express having Diana on the cover as per bloody usual”

    That gave me a good giggle, very close to the truth.

    Still, the headlines should have just read “Uh-oh…”, I think that was the prevailing mood in my flat that day and it proved to be right on the nose…

  44. dhalgren says:

    As an American it is still shocking to see the actual videos or pictures from that day. Now though all these years later it’s a melancholy laced with anger. President Bush had a singular opportunity to bring change to the world. Instead he tread down that old tired path. Pulled, lead, pushed, stumbled, true, but I think as the years go by it won’t be Iraq and Afghanistan that Bush will be remembered for as much as the opportunity he let slip through his hands, and let slip through our hands as Americans.

    As for my feelings that day. My best friend called me here in California that early morning to turn on the television, and I quote, “We’re at war!!”

    I didn’t sit and stare in horror, I paced back and forth, screaming, waving my arms around. I kept telling my parents whoever did that is about to get nuked to fucking hell!

    Watching those buildings crumble to the ground on live television, myself yelling, “OH MY GOD OH MY GOD OH MY GOD”, the one thing I remember most was turning to my parents, who were in their 20′s when Pearl Harbor happened, the complete lack of expression on their faces, my dad’s arm around my mom, neither of them saying a word.

    That is the picture I will remember from that day.

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