BB Video: ARPANET turns 40, and Vintage Computers in Slovenia


(Download this video in MP4.)

This year marks the 40th anniversary of an important milestone in internet history -- the development and successful link of the first host-to-host internet connection.

On April 7 1969, Steve Crocker of UCLA circulated around a memo entitled 'Request for Comments, the first of thousands of "RFCs" documenting the design of ARPANET and the Internet. A few months and many memos and experiments later, in October, 1969, Charley Kline at UCLA sent the first packets on ARPANET as he tried to connect to Stanford Research Institute. Below, a copy of the transmission log.


Boing Boing Video is celebrating internet history in the months to come with a look back at the people, devices, and places that are part of our shared internet history.

In today's episode of the show, we revisit an episode hosted by monochrom's Johannes Grenzfurthner, in which we explore the "Cyberpipe" museum of internet history in Slovenia, where computers and networking devices from those early years can be found. Cyberpipe is hosting related retro-tech exhibits throughout 2009.

Closer to home for our viewers in the US, the Museum of Computer History in the San Francisco Bay Area offers a world-class repository of exhibits, and their website includes a helpful timeline of key events that led to today's web.


RSS feed for new episodes here, YouTube channel here, subscribe on iTunes here. Get Twitter updates every time there's a new ep by following @boingboingvideo, and here are blog post archives for Boing Boing Video. (Special thanks to Boing Boing's video hosting partner Episodic).

Discuss

8 Responses to “BB Video: ARPANET turns 40, and Vintage Computers in Slovenia”

  1. codeman38 says:

    …But the Amiga 500 isn’t mouseless! :)

    And I remember those magazines full of BASIC source code. Fun times.

  2. Fred H says:

    Hells yeah, WIZARDS OF WAR!

  3. Anonymous says:

    OMG wizard of wor LOFL i totally forgot about that game!!

  4. Gronk says:

    “Wizard of Wor”, you mean. But, hell, yeah. It’s still a fun game; definitely worth starting up the c64 emulator when a buddy comes around.

  5. nanuq says:

    While I don’t think it’s all that likely that the Internet will wake up and take over the world, I’d better wish it a happy birthday just to be on the safe side.

  6. thequickbrownfox says:

    I can remember typing line after line after line of code just to get an extremely primitive horse-race game on the Commodore 64 in 1985 or thereabouts.

  7. medo says:

    There is quite interesting and comprehensive computer history museum in Rijeka, Croatia called Peek & Poke. check out their website at: http://www.peekpoke.hr/

  8. Ned613 says:

    Life begins at forty.

Leave a Reply