Google announces Chrome Operating System, open-source Windows competitor

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77 Responses to “Google announces Chrome Operating System, open-source Windows competitor”

  1. Hexatron says:

    wow. i’d love to see it give OS X a good shove, but what would run on it? it would be a whole new platform, wouldn’t it?

  2. Anonymous says:

    That is actually a great news!
    1) Web Apps are getting really powerful these days, not to mention lightweight and fast. Creating web apps is relatively easy and they are compatible with all platforms and browsers (if you know how to code properly). This means that Web Apps will be next big thing

    2) I know that years ago Google invested money into WINE development, to ensure that people can run Photoshop with not problems on Linux. This means that now, in order to take as much market place as possible, Google will probably invest even more money into WINE (or other engine which will be in Chrome OS) to support Windows apps. Which means that I can switch to Linux with all my dev. needs. Finally!

    3) Free? Open Source? That is great. There are hundreds of Linux distros out there, but I can bet that distro, which is financially backed up by Google will be the most stable, powerful and easy to use (without need to run like a 100 SSH commands to install a damn application).

  3. cory says:

    #19: We have faster computers because applications pushed the envelope of what was possible in the local CPU domain, driving demand for faster CPUs. Google is now trying to drive demand for faster networks, and do to broadband what Microsoft did to Intel. And this is a good thing.

    I’m a little annoyed that Google isn’t going to dedicate more resources to Android, though. What the heck was wrong with that.. it *already* runs a browser based on the same rendering engine as Chrome.

  4. ice911 says:

    The OS will be lightweight which will be perfect for netbooks. Google is on the top for searching on the internet, but they understand the effort it takes to get to the internet.
    Turn computer on, wait for OS to load, username and password, wait for startup apps, start browser, and finally (hopefully) internet! They are simply going down the line to make sure that the user will have the best interaction as they search on Google. Google search engine to chrome browser to Google apps to Google desktop to the future chrome OS.

    All of these items complements the Google search engine, which is most likely the intent.

  5. Anonymous says:

    First criticism on Google’s claim that end-users of their OS won’t be bothered by viruses and malware: http://www.googleblogos.com/

  6. Anonymous says:

    “redesigning…..so that users don’t have to deal with viruses, malware and security updates”

    How about dodgyware like google analytics?

  7. ToddBradley says:

    To me, Google has to do a bit of catching up with its own hype machine before I’ll start believing their hypothetical release dates for a new operating system. For example, I’m still waiting for the Chrome browser they promised for my Mac.

    But instead, all I’ve heard for several months now (has it been a year?) is this:

    Google Chrome for Mac is in development and a team of engineers is working hard to bring it to you as soon as possible.

    Please enter your email address below and we’ll let you know when it’s released.

  8. mdh says:

    Your data doesn’t need to be stored in Google’s cloud, you can make your own.

    And to do that today, or in 1999, you’d buy a mac, because as the article says, that was the point of macs. The point of this OS appears to be the cloud beyond your intranet.

  9. Anonymous says:

    What will run on it?

    Nothing, according to what I see. Web-apps only. Anything that runs in a browser, basically.

    This is essentially a stand-alone browser, one that can run without an OS. Not an OS as we know it.

  10. mypalmike says:

    This (and the Chrome browser) all about getting Google Gears widely distributed as an application platform. Locally-running “web apps” are the major hurdle Google needs to get over in order to compete with MS in desktop applications.

  11. sketerpot says:

    This isn’t a standalone browser. It’s Chrome running on a stripped-down Linux distribution that’s customized for instant-boot on ARM netbook hardware.

  12. RevEng says:

    I don’t know what to think about this idea. For specific purposes (like my netbook), an OS/browser that loads in seconds and has nothing else in the way seems like a great idea. We could do with a lot less powerful (and expensive) computers if the crap we don’t want/need was removed from the OS.

    On the other hand, this seems like Google is trying to lead an ideological shift. “Don’t bother with expensive apps,” says Google, “Do everything online. We have email, an office suite, and everything else you’ll ever need all on our website. Let us be the next Microsoft — through your browser.”

    Besides, web browsers are notoriously slow. Even Chrome can’t make AJAX or Flash fast. And from what I’ve seen on my own netbook, the OS isn’t the limiting factor anyway — Flash, MPEG-4, and JavaScript are all heavily CPU-bound.

    Other than using less memory and (potentially) being more secure, is there really a need for this OS, especially when it’s just another Linux-derivative? There are already plenty of good Linux-based OSes out there.

  13. Itsumishi says:

    So would I be able to open up a local version of say Google Docs and run it off the hard drive where I don’t have an internet connection or will this OS pretty much only work if I’m online?

  14. friendpuppy says:

    #5

    At least nobody is trying to sell their own stuff on here…

  15. Anonymous says:

    Release in 2010? By then most netbooks will be running Nvidia Ion (low power higher performance graphics chipsets) or something equivalent. Meaning Windows 7 and games like TF2 and anything else will run fine on netbooks.

    Like Apple, the question becomes, ‘but can it play games?’ Or anything else for that matter.

    Netbooks started out with just linux, and when Windows came along, people were willing to pay a premium to get XP. Chrome OS will end up like Chrome the browser, a lot of hype with little sticking power.

  16. Zandr says:

    Pretending that the browser is an operating system is a bad idea. It didn’t even work on the iPhone for long, so I don’t think it will work any better on netbooks.

    Seriously, an entire operating system where you cannot indent text with the tab key?

    And yeah, “stripped-down Linux” is what passes for “bare metal” these days. So it likely is a standalone browser.

  17. RevEng says:

    #21: Is driving demand for faster networks a good thing?

    Look at what it did to personal computers. Even now, with CPU resources being more than enough for most common uses, people are having to buy new, expensive computers every 3-4 years. Yes, it has forced companies to develop new CPUs, but those CPUs cost a lot more because of the furious research and development that went into them. Imagine how much cheaper computers would be if we were still using P3s.

    The rush for CPU power also left customers constantly unsatisfied. They bought a top of the line computer, but their favorite game (e.g. Crysis) was still dog slow. How does the customer win when the apps they want to use can’t be met by current technology? It puts pressure on manufacturers to develop better technology, but only because there is a significant population whose desires are unmet.

    If Google really does plan to put pressure on ISPs to improve the infrastructure, they better be willing to subsidize it. More bandwidth-hungry applications and more loads on networks will make the ISPs upgrade, but the costs will be passed on to their customers. Not to mention politicians complaining about “the tubes clogging” and trying to legislate limits on everything.

    The markets and technology are complex systems just like the ecosystem. Flood networks with traffic, and you will drive a need for better networks, but you’ll also have several other negative effects.

    If this is Google’s plan, let’s hope they tread lightly.

  18. jphilby says:

    #45: “I think that only gamers feel the need for more processing power in their computers.”

    Except for graphix artists, musicians and other professionals whose vision exceeds the capacity of *any* computer that’ll ever be built.

  19. hopesay says:

    A Linux-based OS with the power of Google behind it is surely going to be great for developers of both web and dedicated applications? Especially if Google were to follow an iPhone Apps model.

  20. Dungeonbrownies says:

    whether or not this’ll work is debatable, but i think that its a good pusch for cloud computing (yes, like ww2 beer hall pusch) and whether or not it can actually be used widely (i doubt it due to lack of global coverage) i think theyve got it in their minds to run it on netbooks. Also its a plus if we’re planning to make everything into a pc =3

  21. Anonymous says:

    As long as they eventually allow me to have my google toolbar in chrome, I might actually use it… Chrome is too stripped down for a browser nevermind a whole operating system!

  22. Anonymous says:

    Even Chrome can’t make AJAX or Flash fast.

    Flash no, but AJAX oh yes, Chrome can make it fast.

  23. Anonymous says:

    Strange that they’re going to base this product on Chrome over Linux, when the Linux release of Chrome still lags so far behind the Win and Mac versions. You’d think, if they had this in the pipe, that the Linux version of Chrome would be ahead of the others, but it’s not even out of alpha.

  24. LX says:

    So the security of your PC is up to Google then? Thank you, I’ll pass this one and stay with a Linux that I have control over.

    Greetings, LX

  25. JC_Nelson says:

    This is like seeing a present as a kid under the tree at Christmas and having to wait to open it and wondering if it is exactly what you wanted or something similar that you like but will go back to playing with your old toys after a week.

  26. Anonymous says:

    I Too did like Google’s Idea of developing the Operating System. Great work Guys..
    But what would it do…..
    will it work with only the web Aps
    will it replace Microsoft’s O/S
    I think , Microsoft O/S has become part of the Blood composition of every software professional…
    Good Luck Google…
    Sheikh Pervez

  27. Anonymous says:

    #6 posted by Itsumishi, July 7, 2009 11:30 PM

    So would I be able to open up a local version of say Google Docs and run it off the hard drive where I don’t have an internet connection or will this OS pretty much only work if I’m online?

    ___________________________________________

    This already exists. It is called Google Gears and it has been out for a while.

  28. Anonymous says:

    somewhere out there Microsoft is shitting bricks…
    letsv just hope this is the beginning of the end for micro$hit…

  29. Anonymous says:

    Yay! this means Google will finally get Chrome working on Linux!

    Hey Google, can you make Sketchup into an OS?
    Or how about a Picasa OS that doesn’t need WINE?

  30. mdh says:

    I want an OS I can run (without a command line interface) on any old PC, to perform minimal tasks, and not have it be slovenly or disease prone.

    Will this be that?

  31. Anonymous says:

    I remember reading somewhere that Android was a full fledged operating system that had been pared down to be a mobile OS. I wonder if this new Chrome OS is actually the full monty version of Android?

  32. Hawley says:

    its about damn time someone started an open source project to create an operating system, the world has been flooded with open source IM clients and browsers for years!

  33. Anonymous says:

    Maybe Google bots have taken over the company, and releasing shiny-chromy product after product is only their long-term strategy to ensnare the gullible in pursuit of their ultimate goal : enslaving mankind.

  34. Anonymous says:

    Thnx for the Browser..IE and Firefox have both failed. They got taken over by nasty root kits.

    So will the new OS have its own Word processor comparable to MS word?

  35. airshowfan says:

    @REVENG#23,

    I think that only gamers feel the need for more processing power in their computers. Everyone else can do just fine on a 5-year-old computer.

    I edit video and high-resolution photographs (often dozens of photographs at a time, straight out of my SLR). I used to have a fairly high-end Vaio several years ago, but a couple years ago I passed it on to a relative and bought what at the time was the cheapest Dell laptop available. It was about as powerful as the Vaio and had MUCH better battery life – and remember, it was the cheapest laptop that Dell sold (and the last one running XP… this was before Dell made netbooks).

    And for most users, YouTube videos (or just running Vista) are the most taxing things their computer will ever do. Relatively few people need more processing power than a netbook (although a bigger screen and keyboard are nice). The market isn’t just “the fastest computers currently possible to build” anymore, it’s now also “computers that are no more powerful than 5-year-old computers but are very cheap and hopefully durable”. Web apps and this Google OS are well suited to those.

  36. imcampos says:

    This so-called operating system will only succeed to the extent that cloud computing eventually prevails. Games, content creation and number crunching will require software installed locally on the PC.

    Furthermore, I dare say that Google made this extemporaneous announcement NOW because some netbook vendors started shipping these machines with the Android operating system, and Google does NOT want that to happen. Android was designed for PDAs (cell phones, if you use them for talking), and it would make a poor OS indeed for netbook PCs. In other words, Google is signaling “wait, the OS is coming, don’t mess things up by using Android on PCs”.

  37. Anonymous says:

    #9 by Dungeonbrownies
    Perhaps you mean ‘pre-WWII beer hall’? Unless this be some non-German thing I am yet to learned be on.

    ps: I didn’t even mention the t I mean war.

  38. Anonymous says:

    Wow, we’re now removing everything from an already rather lightweight OS (Linux), and cripple it to be only used as a glorified browser, then we call it an operating system (which hardly fits that definition if it really is only a browser running on top of a linux kernel).

    Instant innovation!

  39. Anonymous says:

    Basically it’s just another Linux (ultra customised) Distribution. Nobody saw it and ezverybody claim it’s a new OS. OMFG.
    Anyway, i think it will be a f****g good distro.

  40. Anonymous says:

    For Google it is important to offer a product to offer users a faster and convenient with web application. Google has provided good data security Moreover, storing data in cloud implies a authentication process to access also use cryptographic algorithms.The business model is based on Google’s online advertising and it is unthinkable that this orientation is changed and Google Chrome OS is therefore understood as an additional tool used by Google to convey to the greatest number of users as possible for their advertisements, increasingly filtered and contextualized. well what ever but i am looking positively towards Google. Where there is some incompatibility exist on some computer due drivers for more see http://www.techarena.in/review/18377-google-chrome-os-chromium-os.htm

  41. failix says:

    I hate cloud computing… and christmas…

  42. RevEng says:

    #26 posted by Hawley, July 8, 2009 9:28 AM

    its about damn time someone started an open source project to create an operating system, the world has been flooded with open source IM clients and browsers for years!

    You’re kidding, right? There are dozens if not hundreds of GNU/Linux variants, all open-source operating systems. They’ve been developing them since the early 90s. There are also the various BSD variants (FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD) that are open source (not GPL, but similar). Hell, these projects are what started the open source movement!

    Don’t give Google too much credit — this certainly won’t be the first open source operating system.

  43. ice911 says:

    #34 posted by RevEng, July 8, 2009 9:46 AM

    #26 posted by Hawley, July 8, 2009 9:28 AM

    its about damn time someone started an open source project to create an operating system, the world has been flooded with open source IM clients and browsers for years!

    You’re kidding, right? There are dozens if not hundreds of GNU/Linux variants, all open-source operating systems. They’ve been developing them since the early 90s. There are also the various BSD variants (FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD) that are open source (not GPL, but similar). Hell, these projects are what started the open source movement!

    Don’t give Google too much credit — this certainly won’t be the first open source operating system.

    ———

    agreed.

  44. Anonymous says:

    In the linked article, there’s the following statement:

    “We hear a lot from our users… They want their data to be accessible to them wherever they are and not have to worry about losing their computer or forgetting to back up files.”

    Does that mean Google is going to store all users’ data and files?

  45. TakeyMcTaker says:

    I think everyone, especially Google, is burying the lead here. The big news in the Google Blog post isn’t the OS. Everyone has a Linux derivative these days, and Android is already being ported to larger formats. It’s not the browser/cloud-centric view of the OS either — that’s to be expected from Google, and isn’t a big leap from Chrome, Gears, Android, or Palm’s WebOS.

    “Google Chrome running within a new windowing system on top of a Linux kernel.”

    Google is developing a completely new desktop windowing system for Linux! I’m guessing they’re not using ol’ X-Windows, as all the other major desktop GUI APIs do. I wonder if they’ll have any OpenGL support…

  46. thequickbrownfox says:

    Good scoop Xeni (first I heard about it, anyway).

    I’m wondering about things like Flash, Java and various multimedia codecs. How are they going to negotiate these licensing hurdles?

  47. TulsaTV says:

    Coincidentally, I used Knoppix for the first time today. It’s a free and open source version of Linux that boots and runs completely from CD or DVD or USB flash drive.

    It can help you recover files if you have Windows problems, or just be a complete and secure operating system you can carry in your pocket that will work on any computer. It uses a RAMdisk and needs no hard drive at all.

    The hard drive on my laptop suddenly went south yesterday, yet I was able to come up on Knoppix and get my wi-fi connection back. I have it on a cheap 2 gig USB drive with 1.2 gig left over.

    Once you copy the OS over to flash, personal settings are retained and survive a reboot.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knoppix

    http://www.knoppix.net

  48. myosound says:

    I would really be hesitant to call this an “..open-source Windows competitor”; Ubuntu competitor, maybe.

    If this is going to be the new OS that we all are using, then tell me when we’re going to see a port of Adobe CS and Eclipse and Final Cut Pro and Ableton Live and Max/MSP and Half Life 2 etc etc… when will we see all these apps run in the web browser?

    No, I have to agree with some other comments here, this is just another striped down Linux distro for netbooks. Big news for netbooks, not much for the rest of us.

  49. Anonymous says:

    As Google “rethinks the windowing system” they should ask themselves whether they need one at all. If web technology is indeed as mature as they seem to think, then one can just make the whole screen one big web page and leave all the UI stuff to that page (for an example of how a windowing system can be implemented in a web page, see Wiki-OS).

  50. Anonymous says:

    Does this mean Chrome will actually run in linux sometime? AFAIK it still hasn’t been released for linux…

  51. Anonymous says:

    I think I will underestimate what Google is capable of doing. Yeah, that sounds like a great idea!

  52. hohum says:

    @59, You know there are publicly available builds of Chromium for Mac now, right? Just choose the biggest number on the list…

  53. Stephen says:

    Like a lot of the mainstream press, Boing Boing is running with the story that this is a new Chrome based operating system, rather than a Chrome interface on Linux. Why is that? It’s clearly not the case that Google is building an operating system. Why does no one in the press report the more accurate story that Google is releasing it’s own brand of Linux?

  54. Anonymous says:

    #13 – That’s what I thought, too: “Whee, a Linux distro with a windowing system that doesn’t suck!” — purely aesthetic, you understand. ;)

    #14 – with fat pots of cash, one imagines.

  55. jennybean42 says:

    #2
    My thoughts exactly. Are they gonna be archiving me?

  56. Anonymous says:

    (for an example of how a windowing system can be implemented in a web page, see Wiki-OS).

    “Your operating system is not yet supported. To enter Wiki-OS, please navigate to this website using Windows XP, Windows Vista, or Windows 7.

    If you have Linux, please view this website from a Windows virtual machine.”

    It’s still using windows. I’d say Wiki-OS needs work :-P

    Anyway,what they are trying to do with Chrome OS is multifold:
    -simplify machines that access the internet to the level of appliance. The amount of functionality that is ignored by most users is staggering.
    -cause a paradigm shift like what they did with Chrome,esp. in windowing systems. This might be an opportunity – look how focused the Firefox community became.
    -push cloud computing,obviously.

  57. zikman says:

    well hopefully in a year people will get over this netbook fad and they won’t be around anymore.

  58. Anonymous says:

    Yes this does sound good, however, given the situation with government control of everything, and the way they do things, I see a red flag in charges to us and in censorship.

    A good thing would be to see who is behind it. Don’t jump before gauging the depth of the water first. You may break your legs.

  59. Anonymous says:

    Nearly 70 comments and only two people noticed that Google is claiming to have done the first total re-implementation of a networked windowing system since Keith Packard blew the doors off xfree86?

    We’ve learned a tremendous amount since all the existing windowing systems (especially the eneolithic ones used by *ixes) were designed. Packard’s work shows that the existing paradigms, while incredibly farsighted for 1970s programming, are not optimally engineered for modern uses. Highly evolved systems like OSX carve a lot of the fat out, but they aren’t total redesigns despite the frantic latherings of Jobs/Next fanboizen.

    I will remain skeptical until I see it, but Google is talking about reimplementing the windowing system. The existing ones are ludicrously fat dinosaurs with jet engines haphazardly bolted on.

  60. Anonymous says:

    Are they going to sell tablets too?

    If I were Apple or Microsoft, I would be shaking in my boots right now.

  61. Anonymous says:

    Incredible that even announcing the existence of an OS whose features we can only wonder about now starts an OS flamewar. Good show guys, seriously.

  62. Anonymous says:

    I found out something huge in the russian network – Chrome OS exclusive screenshots leaked by anonymous Google developer:
    http://chereshka.net/chrome-os-leaked-screenshots/

    It could be the real deal, who knows…

  63. Itsumishi says:

    This so-called operating system will only succeed to the extent that cloud computing eventually prevails. Games, content creation and number crunching will require software installed locally on the PC.

    I’d say that’s a very short term view.

    Did you read this article” just the other day?

    I’d say computers are definitely heading towards the cloud computing model. There is too many good reasons not to.

    Create a bunch of servers that are VERY powerful.
    Create a bunch of terminals that have just enough power to connect to the internet very quickly and a butt load of RAM.

    If I could licence a copy of the Adobe Design Suite that instead of having installed locally I could just sign in and use it on whatever computer I wanted whenever I would do it in a second (provided it wasn’t painfully slow and crappy, which of course currently it would be, in 5-10 years time I’d say it’ll be pretty easily achievable.)

  64. Anonymous says:

    I share the skepticism of pretty much everyone else here. It’s being advertised as mainly for netbooks but also available for laptops and even desktops, but I ask you, who’s going to use it?

    Not the casual PC user, who only knows Windows and would be confused by the lack of applications on the desktop.

    Not Linux users, who already know their favorite distro inside out and are tweaking it to perfection.

    And not OS X users, who enjoy the local widgets and user friendliness of Mac products.

    Granted, it may be the best thing for netbooks, but who really uses a netbook? Granted, there’s a market, but it’s nothing like the market for desktops, laptops, and phones that seem to become more like mini-computers every day.

    However, if you don’t believe me, maybe you’ll enjoy the video at http://www.newsy.com/videos/google_gears_up_for_os about the predicted victory of Google over Microsoft.

  65. jeffguevin says:

    @8: The tab thing is annoying, but already solved for sites that care to solve it. Google Documents allows “normal” tabbing, for instance.

  66. hohum says:

    @48 Stephen, That’s completely true, but it seems to be a matter of semantics… Do you make the same argument about OS X? It’s just a pretty interface running on a fork of FreeBSD.

    To the majority of end-users, this is what makes an OS. Also, just as OS X has a lot more to it than FreeBSD with some eye-candy slapped on, it seems as if Google is really hacking away at the Linux underbelly. They say that they’re “completely redesigning the underlying security architecture,” as well as introducing a new window manager.

    If it was just Anynix with X11 and a shiny new desktop environment, well, it’d probably already be out by now.

    @Everyone, I don’t really think it’s intended to compete with Windows, at least not yet. It seems more to be a really solid instant-on OS for netbooks. Will this suffice for many users, ridding them of the need for Windows? I’d say so. I know that personally, this would be all I’d need for my go-to-the-park-and-write computer, with the final destination being my Mac Pro at home. Complementing, not replacing.

  67. Anonymous says:

    Wouldn’t everything you can run have to be free? You couldn’t really “buy” html apps, could you? And everyone but Google wants to make money off their products.

  68. Anonymous says:

    I Love google
    It has always been there for me.
    It has supported MS X and the big L

    Bring it on
    YOU GOOD THING

  69. Anonymous says:

    Hi,

    it is really good news about this

    as end user i m exacting low cost OS + it should work with all other windows base software on new OS example, corel draw, Autocad, Quickbook etc.. + need fast OS + need virus free OS

    reg
    amin

  70. peetee says:

    You want facts? “what if your browser was your operating system. new OS no kernel, no all…. BIOS was redesigned?”

    It’s like they made a mobile OS and applied in a computer

    See the Chrome’s detailed review: best or worst

    Sounds promising, but only for my netbook.. there’s no way in hell I will use this for my desktop (just in case BIG G decided to used this on PC in the future)

  71. Anonymous says:

    I have no opinion on Google’s OS. If someone makes
    a live cd of it I’ll give it a try.

    #7 made me laugh:
    “Release in 2010? By then most netbooks will be running Nvidia Ion (low power higher performance graphics chipsets) or something equivalent. Meaning Windows 7 and games like TF2 and anything else will run fine on netbooks.”

    Yeah, if I just wait, hardware that can run
    Windows is coming soon. It’s hilarious that each new Microsoft operating system is more resource hungry than the last.

  72. Anonymous says:

    what are the additional features of chrome os other than windows?

  73. imag says:

    Great. We have increasingly faster computers, but Google seems intent on hampering us to the speed of our internet connection.

    I don’t get it. These web apps are just useless in comparison to dedicated applications. A browser is not the best universal application platform, nor is HTML the most appropriate code.

    After having a personal gmail account for a few years, but after my work email switched to gmail, it has become obvious that it just is not robust enough to be an officing solution. You can’t scroll down through thousands of emails, the Conversations feature becomes a total nightmare when you are trying to find things later, copying from one email to another is a PITA, and the whole steaming pile is slower than a bad email client from 10 years ago. I’m running T-bird on IMAP now, which still isn’t nearly good as our crummy Exchange server was.

    Don’t get me wrong – I actively campaign against giving Microsoft money, and I would love for Google to put their intelligence to work on proper, streamlined applications. But going full-web, which they will undoubtedly do, is just a sad way to cripple a perfectly good computer, IMO.

  74. Anonymous says:

    Microsoft already left behind Google with their windows4all.com project.

  75. Anonymous says:

    I’ll keep my mac. I dont trust google that much. Thanks…

  76. NotACat says:

    It seems to me (and I can hear the knives sharpening as I type those words ;-) that people are neglecting one simple consideration.

    There is no intrinsic reason why the network to which you connect your netbook—running GoogleOS or whatever—should extend any further than your house, or correspondingly your office.

    Your data doesn’t need to be stored in Google’s cloud, you can make your own. I’m also thinking about Wave, which is open-source. I don’t know how big it is, but I would imagine that an office-sized server could run it, and maybe a home-sized server these days.

    My Apple-loving colleague is fond of telling me what he can do with his iPhone and his Mac over his home Internet connection. I would say things just got a little more interesting for Apple as well as for Microsoft.

  77. Notary Sojac says:

    Hmmm, doing all my routine computing tasks on line, just as my ISP is about to start capping my usage and charging me for increments of bandwidth.

    Sounds dandy, I can hardly wait.