Bletchley Park codebreakers recognized by British government

Discuss

20 Responses to “Bletchley Park codebreakers recognized by British government”

  1. Anonymous says:

    About time! this place is fascinating.

    Derek Jacobi plays Alan Turing in ‘Breaking the Code’ – an excellent film about his life.

    P.S. MI5 had Guy Burgess and Anthony Blunt, who were both homosexual – but public school so part of the old boy network..It didn’t seem to affect their security levels..

    P.P.S. Then there is the famous apple..

  2. TheCrawNotTheCraw says:

    @4

    What’s your point? That old technology seems quaint, and is much slower than today’s technology? Yawn.

    The supercomputer I worked with at Goddard Space Flight Center in the 1980s is an antique today; it’s probably sitting in a dump somewhere. That doesn’t mean that it wasn’t significant in its day.

  3. Anonymous says:

    my goodness people these men, women & machines where truly groundbreaking.
    for those who want a wonderful, if not truly factual account of these achievements read
    Cryptonomicon by the one and only Mr Neal Stephenson.

  4. Lauren O says:

    Turing received no official recognition for his work in his lifetime, true, but everyone remotely associated with computer science knows him and reveres him.

    Fat lot of good that does him.

  5. abfo says:

    Should note that the bombe was based on earlier work by the Polish. Also that after the war Churchill ordered Colossus and the bombes to be destroyed because he thought they were too dangerous to fall into enemy hands. One wonders how different the world would be if he went the other way…

  6. Takuan says:

    I still feel there is strong possibility the government murdered him.

  7. Anonymous says:

    Tommy Flowers was a GPO engineer and thus knew hardware. Alan Turing was a clever man, clever enough to use maths to outwit the nazi empire but not clever enough to effectively conceal his own behaviour . Maybe hardware is easier than people?

  8. mdh says:

    Alan Turing was a clever man, clever enough to use maths to outwit the nazi empire but not clever enough to effectively conceal his own behaviour.

    That particular form of brilliance often goes hand in hand with that particular inability.

    The shame was never his.

  9. Takuan says:

    ? perhaps he was clever enough to know that he should not have to conceal his “behaviour”. The British government at the time had many, many gay men throughout it. Were they clever in going along with the destruction and killing of identified gay people at the time?

    Turing, ahead of his time in more areas than one.

  10. skeletoncityrepeater says:

    I know this thread shouldn’t really be about Alan Turing, but I just wanted to mention that his biography, although rather ‘tedious’ is fascinating and really shows what an important and dedicated person this man was. It also illuminates the tragedy of barbarism and xenophobia practiced to this day by the cowards who run our civilized governments.

  11. sopekmir says:

    There is a good and unbiased account on Enigma and Bletchley Park: http://www.codesandciphers.org.uk/enigma/index.htm

    Good to see UK government to do justice to hidden heroes.

    The fate for many of them was tragic.
    Max Ciezki, the supervisor of Polish cracking of Enigma in 1932, first suffered in Nazi camp and later died in poverty and oblivion, as the result of communists going after him…

    He was finally brought to his native Szamotuly and got postmortem honour in … 2008.

  12. unclewilco says:

    The Hut where the coding took place was a finalist in this years Shed of the year competition.

    http://www.shedblog.co.uk/finalists

    In the end the Kite Cabin won

    http://www.shedblog.co.uk/kitecabin

    regards

    wilco

  13. Joe MommaSan says:

    Turing was arrested for homosexuality in 1952 and committed suicide shortly afterwards, having received no official recognition for his work in his lifetime.

    Typical of the sort of “reward” you get for serving a country or government.

  14. Phoobar says:

    Turing received no official recognition for his work in his lifetime, true, but everyone remotely associated with computer science knows him and reveres him.

    Who is Tommy Flowers?

  15. grikdog says:

    Perpetuating the myth of British invincibility when it comes to reading the world’s mail. ENIGMA, which appears to have been considerably more enigmatic than the propaganda would have us believe, will never be used again and, in any case, seems like a steampunk Secret Decoder Ring compared to Rijndael or Whirlpool based stream ciphers. Bletchley Park flower girls takin’ dictation from Perfesser ‘Iggins, what? Somebody make a movie.

  16. Anonymous says:

    They’ve been recognized! Quick, time for new identities.

  17. Zarniwoop says:

    @ #3

    Tommy Flowers was the inventor of the programmable computer. The Colossus was actually the first programmable computer.

  18. vortex says:

    hey again corey,

    i think the context of alan turing’s death should be qualified.

    alan turing was judged for his crime of homosexuality. strong hormonal therapy was the sentence prescribed to cure him.

    i don’t think it should be forgotten that he committed suicide under these circumstances.

    the state that militarily benefits from his genius actively participates in assisting the death of a dedicated and talented mathematician and code breaker.

    and the official recognition? he has a roundabout named after him just outside of milton keynes.

Leave a Reply