Make video about visible sound and vibration

Discuss

19 Responses to “Make video about visible sound and vibration”

  1. Anonymous says:

    Ghost Busters Two?

  2. farmfoodie says:

    The coolest trip of my life was just like that, except in technicolor, slow motion, and accompanied by an original symphonic composition my brain wrote just for that occasion. (I can’t play any instrument and have no musical talent that I know of.) The only time I’ve ever had synaesthesia. Unforgettable.

  3. Jerril says:

    You can have a lot of fun with cornstarch and water. Period. Everything else is just props and accessories for having fun with oobleck :D

    Shear thickening liquids for the win!

  4. keighvin says:

    This was used to carve cymatic glyphs into the Rosslyn chapel 500 years ago:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cy2Dg-ncWoY

  5. fantasymarks says:

    Must do this ourselves soon. So should Arc Attack…

  6. dwdyer says:

    Words to impress people when talking about the cornstarch/water mixture:

    rheopecty/rheopectic

    And the opposite — for things that get less thick when stirred/agitated:

    thixotropy/thixotropic

    Use these words with caution.

  7. dwdyer says:

    Addendum to #13 — because some geek is going correct your use of rheopectic when referring to cornstarch/water — look it up. ;-)

  8. harpdevil says:

    This looks very interesting and the video was fun, but what is cymetics used for? I assume it’s more looking at sound waves on the computer rather than corn-starch monsters, but I would be curious as to what we use cymetics for.

  9. Phikus says:

    I’m sure if you played some heavy metal it would turn into a the face of a screaming demon!

  10. Anonymous says:

    Artist / painter named Perry Hall has been creating much more beautiful and artistic work using sound waves and paint, for quite some time– called sound drawings. Made his first experiments like thse when working with John Gaeta for tests on a film over 10 years ago. His work has been in the Smithsonian, shown all over the globe:

    http://www.lovebrain.net/paintings

    he also has a lot of work where he makes oil paint move, acrylics behave in different ways. A lot of images on the website

  11. txdesign says:

    Was this inspired by “The Big Bang Theory” episode where they had cornstarch/water mix on a woofer?
    Its great either way!

  12. mdh says:

    Beware, Cthulu slumbers.

  13. Anonymous says:

    a more vivid example of cymatics:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GtiSCBXbHAg

  14. Trent Hawkins says:

    I wonder if this would work with plaster of paris…

  15. skeletoncityrepeater says:

    Have people run out of things to post about? A simple search on the ‘google custom search’ using the search term ‘corn starch’ reveals 2 posts about speakers and corn starch, and ‘non Newtonian’ behavior. Honestly I’ve been shy about trying to post things out of fear of rejection, but if just reposting the same subject or bringing to attention the latest Worth 1000 contest is worth a post on my favorite blog, I guess I could try sumbitting something more novel.

    That said, it’s always cool to see weird blobs move around.

    • Antinous / Moderator says:

      skeletoncityrepeater,

      You probably should avoid Icanhascheezburger. It’s fifty of the same joke every day for years. And it never gets old.

  16. Wirelizard says:

    That’s not Cthulhu, it’s a dwarf shoggoth!

    Very cool.

    #15, stop complaining about the flavour of the free ice cream…

  17. eustace says:

    Shuggoth indeed! He was obviously summoning the Flying Spaghetti Monster. With some success.

  18. a random John says:

    Very cool. I wonder if you could get any results at all with actual music being played through it rather than just tones.

    I’ve made an experimental iTunes visualizer that pushes and pulls 3d shapes (google for Manifesto visualizer) but it is operating on a collection of twisted tubes rather than a lumpy mass. Perhaps some lumpy mass visualizations would be a fun avenue for future research.

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