Goat rentals for clearing brush

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56 Responses to “Goat rentals for clearing brush”

  1. Caroline says:

    You mean W. doesn’t need to personally clear all the brush in Texas?

  2. winkybb says:

    Now I think I’ll start a service offering to remove goat-shit from previously brush-infested sites.

  3. EFDisaster says:

    an old friend from high school moved back to his family’s “ancestral” land in Kentucky and is now raising goats… he told me that the state of Kentucky pays him if his goats eat the particularly nasty invasive plants in his area.

  4. bolamig says:

    Yep, we’ve had the goats clearing the wildfire buffer zone on our Bay Area property for decade or so now. The goatherder pulls his fifth wheel trailerhome on to the property and lives there for a week or so while the goats do their thing. The kids love it, and it brings a smile to everyone’s eyes.

  5. LogrusZed says:

    The Oregon Extension Service (a program based out of Oregon State University) offers goat “rentals” as well as gardening information, help with canning and preserving, and pretty much any other agriculture related help you can think of.

    • Anonymous says:

      Oregon State University Extension thanks you for the plug. We are pretty amazing, if I must say so, however, WE DO NOT RENT GOATS.
      The good news is we have the contact information for quite a few companies that offer 4 legged brush removal services. In Washington County call 503-821-1150 and one of our friendly Office Support Specialists will be happy to help you.
      LorifromOSU

  6. Anonymous says:

    Stoned goats clear Humoldt County farm….

  7. Sean Eric FAgan says:

    We saw the Goats R Us team once, I think, driving home from San Francisco: a person watching a few goats merrily chew up the brush alongside the highway. It was pretty neat to see. (And there was at least one fairly large goat with them, much taller than the small goats I’m used to from petting zoos.)

  8. MrsBug says:

    I love this. Our local waste water treatment plant has a fenced lagoon where they use a small herd of sheep (with a watch llama!) to ‘mow’ the lawn around the lagoon.

  9. Anonymous says:

    In the “after” picture, the brush does not appear to be cleared. Merely de-greened; it’s still impassibly tangled with scrub, although much less attractive to look at.

  10. ill lich says:

    Great, so instead of clearing brush I’m clearing piles of goat droppings.

  11. jyindc says:

    Are they really clearing all the brush, or are they just eating all the green leaves, leaving the rest of the bush for a person to remove?

    • Anonymous says:

      Man, they eat *everything.* My mom’s property was covered in blackberry bushes, and they ate the thorns, the stalks, all of it. Their tongues are like leather.

  12. anders411 says:

    Save gas by not using a lawnmower by renting goats that are hauled around in a 5th wheel.

    Uhm….

  13. Anonymous says:

    it happens in Los Angeles too.
    It is nothing weird.
    Goats been known for that.
    You City people!!!!
    I live in LA

  14. adamnvillani says:

    The City of L.A. has used goats at Angels Knolls Park a couple of times now:
    http://la.curbed.com/tags/goats

  15. V says:

    also the star of Pemco Insurance’s ‘We’re a Lot Like You” ad campaign.

    http://www.werealotlikeyou.com/ (Flash site – Profile #80)

  16. Roy Trumbull says:

    We’ve used an SF area company for 2 years on our temple property. The kids love to watch them. Only downside is that when they’re done you’ll find all the old tires, dead branches, and other refuse that had been covered up by the grass and weeds. There were more than two truckloads of that junk. There’s a trailer on site and the goats are kept behind temporary fencing.

  17. LogrusZed says:

    @#15: Why would you clear goat droppings? They don’t really smell and they fertilize, and they’re hard and dry. Goat poo isn’t really very messy.

  18. bcsizemo says:

    Won’t the brush just grow back?

    I mean I can brush cut English Ivy to the ground and it will re-sprout and continue to thrive. The same goes for most of the plants I need to get rid of. Of course manually ripping it all out seems to work pretty good. It’s just hard on the hands and back.

  19. Anonymous says:

    The amount of time and energy a goat operation uses compared to conventional mechanical methods is just as inefficient. You have a crew of men showing up to install the fence….multiple trips in their rigs…the energy to put up the fence..time and energy waste. then the goats really dont do that good of job…they do not eat hardwood,dead hardwood branches, and can not eat plants that are poisonous to them.For a 100×100 lot can be done in one or two days with one person working efficiently with a mower and weed whacker…and use about 2 gallons of gas. Instead of 10 trips out with the goat trailor unloading goats all day…just that alone uses more gas then me showing up alone to work. Mechanical methods far exceed any goat eating processes. Not only that…then its 10 more trips out to pick up the goats and all the cyclone fence surrounding the property. In the end the goats do not work efficiently. and goats being “green” is a joke. i can prove it any which way you need.

  20. bobbiej says:

    goats eat the leaves which is the best way to kill the brush. If they were to eat the whole plant, then as it is when you cut back any other plant, they would send four times as much growth. When only the leaves are eaten the bush thinks it is still alive and doesn’t send new growth.

    the goat pellets are good for the land.

    if you think 1,000 is a lot of money to clear a 1/4 acre of blackberries, you have never cleared blackberries.

  21. alowishus says:

    I used to ride my bike up into the hills behind Berkeley. They use goats to clear brush up there. One day I stopped to talk to the herder, who was living in a little camper with a dog. He said he was from South America, traveled the US managing goat herds for brush clearing. Said he’d worked in Texas, Oklahoma, a few other places. I wanted to ask him more, but there was a language barrier that I couldn’t cross (my Spanish is lame). Anyway, he was an extremely interesting guy and I wish I could’ve spoken with him more.

  22. asplund says:

    When I was a kid, I used to see goats around military installations – my understanding was that they were used around munitions storage (no sparks from lawnmowers).

  23. fivedog says:

    The amount of time and energy a goat operation uses compared to conventional mechanical methods is just as inefficient. You have a crew of men showing up to install the fence….multiple trips in their rigs…the energy to put up the fence..time and energy waste. then the goats really dont do that good of job…they do not eat hardwood,dead hardwood branches, and can not eat plants that are poisonous to them.For a 100×100 lot can be done in one or two days with one person working efficiently with a mower and weed whacker…and use about 2 gallons of gas. Instead of 10 trips out with the goat trailor unloading goats all day…just that alone uses more gas then me showing up alone to work. Mechanical methods far exceed any goat eating processes. Not only that…then its 10 more trips out to pick up the goats and all the cyclone fence surrounding the property. In the end the goats do not work efficiently. and goats being “green” is a joke. i can prove it any which way you need.

  24. nutbastard says:

    @#7

    “Read through the web site. You need to understand that the service *starts* at $1025 per day…”

    that’s only $10.25 per goat. Also, it might be prudent to see what conventional methods cost to get a sense of perspective. a quarter acre is 10,890 square feet – or a square ~100 feet on a side. that’s a not insignificant amount of brush. plus, with conventional means, you have to have all the material hauled off, which can be expensive.

  25. hawkins says:

    Depending on the vegetation, and the amount of time you leave them there, and how bored they get, goats will often destroy the vegetation right down to the dirt-line.

    Goats are an extremely destructive natural force, to be used with care. They will nibble on absolutely anything they can get into their mouths: from the leather upholstery on your vintage MG Midget convertible to the (lit) cigarette in your hand.

    The REALLY cool thing about goats is that their eyes have rectangularly-dilating pupils, which just looks amazingly satanic.

    Here in Charlottesville, the service is called Goat Busters. Har, har.

  26. fivedog says:

    Also…the goats dont actually eat the stem off at the ground. They eat the fresh green leaves…which mean it will grow back much faster ensuring they get paid to come back again. Wasting more gas and money and time and energy.
    …also..they do not eat brush thats more then 4 ft off the ground,leaving stuff dangling on the fence line and trees.
    …so to bring out 100-200 goat to your property requires many multiple trips in a truck hauling a trailor. This process is called “gas consumption”….contrary to your belief that goats are green. And remember to multiply this process by not just 2..remember they be coming back…so multiple it by multiples of 4.
    ………conventional methods of mechanically clearing the brush with a blade that turns at 8-10,000 rpm does not consume this much gas. I can clear an acre of brush better and fast and more efficiently then any goat…with less time and energy then any goat hauling crew. AND……FOR THE SAME PRICE OR LESS!!!
    ….brush clearing with brush goats is a sham from start to finish.

  27. Tensegrity says:

    @asplund

    The spark issue is quite important. Major fires have been started by sparks from landscaping equipment.

  28. nutbastard says:

    @#3

    “Not sure why this is being treated as new”

    I’M not sure where you got the impression that this WAS being treated as new…

    @#5 agies

    regular knotweed is on their list:

    Blackberries
    Ivy
    Scotch Broom
    Knot Weed
    Morning Glory
    Holly
    nuisance trees and saplings
    Nettle, Thistle, grasses, and Horsetail

    • lovemyfaintinggoats says:

      I love your name, and although I am just reading this today and you may not be hear anymore, you clearly “get this” when a lot of posters don’t.

      And whats all the harping about the goat poop. Get a grip. You’d rather smell the gas fumes, listen to the noise, and use toxic herbicides on he land?

  29. fishbear says:

    There is also Eco-Goats — recently hired to clear some brush in Baltimore’s Druid Hill Park.

  30. Anonymous says:

    I’m always happy to see the hordes of rented goats here in the Oakland hills at the start of fire season. I once referred to them as “fire control goats” to my wife, and she promptly re-dubbed them “pyrokinetic goats,” which sounds rather less helpful.

  31. fatcat1111 says:

    My daughter’s school has a steep, rock-strewn slope on one side that was completely overgrown with blackberries and English ivy. Parents tried on several occasions to clear it out, to no avail. So they brought in the goats, and they were stunningly effective. They took about four days, just leaving them penned in with some water. Oh and the kids loved them, and weren’t exposed to toxins.

    There are some photos here: http://westseattleblog.com/blog/?p=3767.

  32. cstatman says:

    cattle will eat the grass down to ~ 1/4″ high. and it grows back.

    Goats will eat everything, as high as they can climb, as low as they can dig.

    they are EXTREMELY effective for clearing land. But you will need to re-seed, or plant if yuo want anything to grow.

    I’ve watched goats eat grass, weeds, poison ivy, sticks, tin cans, electrified fencing, fiberglass off an old boat

    They are VERY effective eating and cleaning machines. When they eat your land bare, they will jump/climb/eat the fence to get to your neighbor.

    On a slightly weird note, has anyone noticed the rotating herd of sheep at Zanker and Hwy 237 in Silicon Valley? they seem to be moved to different parts of the intersection, dissapear for a while, then come back. I do not know why?

  33. Duffong says:

    who then clears the goat poo?

  34. Nylund says:

    I grew up in Silicon Valley and they used to bring in the goats to clear the brush on the hill by our high school. We often ate our lunches on that hill and at a certain point in the year, we’d go up and find it fenced off and covered with goats. It always amused us, despite the fact that it meant having to find a new spot to eat our sandwiches.

  35. DWittSF says:

    Plus, you can’t eat a lawnmower!

  36. JIMWICh says:

    My grandpa bought goats to clear a big farm of small brush after purchasing the land in the 1940s.

    It’s a long-known brush-clearing solution.

  37. trr says:

    Are you suggesting eating a goat? No thanks!
    I was amazed to see them clear out Himalayan blackberries, the noxious invasive plant here in the Northwest.

  38. Aloisius says:

    There is a similar company in California that has been renting out goats to places like the Berkeley hills for the last 12 years or so called Goats R Us. They clear poison oak as well as brush which is pretty awesome.

  39. Anonymous says:

    Not sure why this is being treated as new…. I have lived in 6 different states and 3 countries, and everywhere I have lived I have seen rent-a-goats. It is a GREAT way to take care of brush, but its old hat by now.

    I do like that news about this is being propagated.. now if we could just gengineer got lawnmowers haha.

    What I would love to see is an article about hunters pushing invasive species into new areas so they can hunt them, such as birds and especially boar.

  40. Connie H. says:

    Goat droppings are small and don’t smell (at least not as much as the goats do) and they biodegrade into fertilizer with the first hard rain.

    Also, they actually love to eat poison ivy, so what’s not to like?

  41. Damon_TFB says:

    “Nothing makes a desert like a goat.”
    — Terry Pratchett, Small Gods

  42. ConnieKimchi says:

    Brilliant! While you’re at it you can hire a falconer to do rodent control. Now if only someone would offer anteater rentals…

  43. Agies says:

    Wonder if they could clear out Japanese Knotweed.

  44. Ian70 says:

    Goats for the brush, and sheep for the lawn. Small-scale ruminants work great even in a suburban setting.

    • EMJ says:

      Any experience with this or are you just suggesting it from your suburban horizon?

      I have sheep and would not suggest them to any suburbanite. They need fences and daily care. Protection from dogs and other predators. Water, feed, shearing and hoof trimming. It takes commitment and work.

  45. Gilmoid1 says:

    My landlord once brought in 3 goats to clear the back yard of grass. The goats preferred the 3 orange trees and the 2 lemon trees. And don’t get me started on the cannister-shot goat pellets!!

  46. jimh says:

    We have had the goats in the Bay Area out on Yerba Buena Island clearing the extremely steep slopes, which were covered by chest high or higher blackberry brambles and poison oak. They did a great job and it was amazing to watch them work. The goats cleared it much faster than a five man crew ever could have, and with less safety risk. They love the steeps. First they trample, then they eat! Also, border collies are involved, so yeah, awesome.

  47. Anonymous says:

    FYI
    My prices at Rent-a-Ruminant LLC start at $725/24 hour day Who came up with the $1200 and $1025 per day?? I also bid for larger jobs and that drops the price..

  48. Anonymous says:

    Read through the web site. You need to understand that the service *starts* at $1025 per day…

    • rahlquist says:

      Wow, they want you to pay them $1250 a day to feed their goats? WTH for that price I buy up to 25 of them and resell them after the complete the job?!?!

      • Anonymous says:

        You don’t kow much about goats. They are a little bit more pricey than that. Also they require some care, hoof trimming and vaccines.

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