Real calculators modeled after desktop calculators

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31 Responses to “Real calculators modeled after desktop calculators”

  1. dculberson says:

    Side note:

    I think it’s funny that the actual physical calculators would reflect the design philosophies of the operating systems they’re based upon. I.e. the Mac calculator looks really slick and high end but has very limited functionality. (no square root, no back space, no radian…) The Windows calculator looks really cheap and plasticky but just does more.

    Neither one would make a very good calculator, except for a really basic kicking around on the desktop type calculator.

  2. tilthouse says:

    I, for one, just want a real, physical version of the I Ching calculator from Dirk Gently

  3. darren says:

    If they made a version of the Mac Calculator in Scientific RPN mode I would pay all kinds of money to get one.

  4. stratosfyr says:

    @Gloria

    You clearly haven’t sat an exam since the invention of SMS. Just having a cell phone on your person is practically grounds for expulsion these days.

    Anyway, my phone doesn’t do fractions or stats like my Casio. Not that I’m not sure there’s an app for that. But, y’know, J2ME. Meh.

  5. Cowicide says:

    I think it’s funny that the actual physical calculators would reflect the design philosophies of the operating systems they’re based upon. I.e. the Mac calculator looks really slick and high end but has very limited functionality. (no square root, no back space, no radian…) The Windows calculator looks really cheap and plasticky but just does more..

    I think it’s funny that your post is ironically a great representation the general misrepresentation of Macs.

    Not only is the Mac calculator “really slick and high end” (a.k.a., a better interface) it has way MORE functionality. It opens as a basic calculator without a bunch of clutter for most usage. But, If you want a scientific calendar just click “command-2″ or select it from the standard Apple menu in the Apple menu bar.

    Here it is, check it out:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Calculator_Screenshot_MacOSX.png

    It also has:

    - A Programmer calculator (command-3 or Apple menu option)

    - Conversions of Area, Currency, Energy or Work, Length, Power, Pressure, Speed, Temperature, Time, Volume, and Weights and Masses

    - An RPN mode

    - An optional ‘Paper Tape’ window

    - You can save and print the ‘Paper Tape’ results or copy and paste them from it, whichever you prefer..

    - It can speak results to you and speak the numbers you type as you press them. Huge time savings when you are looking at the content of what you are typing in and confirming you are hitting in the correct numbers without having to look at your calculator.

    - And more…

    I hate to break it to you, but Macs are good looking AND smart. Ouch…

  6. Cowicide says:

    I said above, ” .. But, If you want a scientific calendar … ”

    correction: I meant to say, “scientific calculator”.

  7. brianary says:

    This is obviously some strange new usage of the word “real” that I was not previously aware of.

    Also, similar to emacs comment: I’d like a physical perl -lne ‘print eval’ .

    Best of all would be a physical calculator that did date math (addition and subtraction of dates/times and durations) easily, until we finally give up on the stupid Julian calendar in favor of the French Revolutionary calendar or some other such metric time.

  8. Anonymous says:

    I wonder if they work incorrctly, like the software versions (at least the Windows version). 2 + 3 x 4 does not equal 20, despite what the simple windows calculator says. Like Myatu, I keep mine in scientific mode all the time, which does calculate the answer correctly as 14.

    The simple version does order of operations like an old adding machine. That is how they are supposed to work.

    • brianary says:

      What you may really want is a stack-based postfix hp calculator, so there is no ambiguity or operator precedence: 2 3 4 × +

  9. Cowicide says:

    I forgot to mention that you can also simply click the round green button towards the top-left of the Mac calculator to switch between Basic, Scientific, and Programmer modes. And, yes, it does it in slick manner where the shape of the calculator seamlessly morphs into the new size which is not only good for aesthetics but also assists the user in knowing she is using the same calculator transformed instead of a new calculator and/or calculator window opening. It’s a Mac thing.

    I should also mention that the Mac calculator has been much like this for many years before Vista and Windows 7 came out. /smug

  10. Gloria says:

    People still own/buy calculators? All the times I’ve needed a physical calculator, I just used my cellphone. Serves in a pinch.

    @Cowicide: You awe but also scare me a little. I salute you.

  11. han says:

    I wonder what would happen if I pressed that bright, shiny red button…

    At least with sufficient effort you could implement the maximize and minimize buttons.

  12. tmccartney says:

    Holy crap. I want the Windows one. Looks like a concept only at this point. Too bad.

  13. Myatu says:

    I like these! Except I have mine in “Scientific” mode at all times. Plus they need double-sided tape on the backs, so you can stick it onto the screen (and hey, if they do this and they put the solar stip on the back as well, it’d even be powered by the actual PC… Well, monitor / LCD screen actually).

    • Brainspore says:

      I like the way you think. Grabbing one of these off the screen while someone is watching you work would blow their freakin’ mind.

      Now I wonder if I could find a trash can that gets overstuffed and bloated as soon as you put a single document in it.

      • Piers W says:

        Or slide the calculator you have cunningly hidden behind the screen into view as you drag the calculator window off the desktop…

        Re above:

        Devon Tech also do the interesting DevonThink software:

        http://boingboing.net/2009/01/27/diy-how-to-write-a-b.html

        and another free OS X service module thingy that adds the time and date in various ways and does a ton of complex formatting commands called WordService, but only to cocoa apps like mail and textedit. (It’s on the same page)

        From the beginning I’ve never quite got why you can’t cut and paste the date and time via the OS anyway. (By which I don’t mean open a terminal window and cut and paste it from that)

  14. dbgboy says:

    I’d be very disappointed if the windows version didn’t morph to the wider format when scientific mode is selected.

  15. inkadinka12 says:

    I wonder if they work incorrctly, like the software versions (at least the Windows version). 2 + 3 x 4 does not equal 20, despite what the simple windows calculator says. Like Myatu, I keep mine in scientific mode all the time, which does calculate the answer correctly as 14.

    • Anonymous says:

      2 + 3 * 4 does equal 20. If you mean, 2 + (3 * 4) then sure, 14 is where it’s at.

      • Anonymous says:

        Multiplication is completed previous to addition unless the numbers to be added are enclosed by parentheses. Examples: 2 + 3 * 4 = 14 (2+3)*4 = 20.

    • vytautasmalesh says:

      Please Excuse Sally Aunt Dear My?

    • dculberson says:

      I also use my calc in scientific mode.. but I think the calculator actually handles order of operations perfectly. In “standard” view, it performs the operations as they’re entered, just like a standard desktop calculator. In “scientific” view, it performs them according to PEMDAS. That seems really logical to me.

      Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem to be in the help file! They certainly should have covered that…

  16. hisdevineshadow says:

    Well at least one person remembers how to use Reverse Polish Notion which was going to be my question.

  17. hisdevineshadow says:

    I meant “Notation”. Noticed my mistake after I clicked submit.

  18. Zan says:

    I want to see a physical version of the Windows 7 calculator. Seriously, that thing rocks!

  19. peterbruells says:

    Cute.

    But I use “emacs -f calc” – model *that* :-)

  20. Bucket says:

    If only there was a real world version of my favorite software calculator, emu48.

    Oh, wait.

  21. word_virus says:

    Yeah, no scientific mode = Fail. I’d love to see a real-life SpeedCrunch calc, too…

  22. Mark Crummett says:

    What’s that sound? The buzz of MR and Apple lawyers sharpening their pencils?

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