Veterans, some with brain injuries, curate neglected Army archaeological collection

Discuss

12 Responses to “Veterans, some with brain injuries, curate neglected Army archaeological collection”

  1. nathan says:

    “Of the 50,508 non-mortally wounded soldiers in OIF/OEF there are at least 10,000 serious injuries such as brain injuries, spinal and amputations, according to DOD sources…September 2005, estimate of 20% serious brain injuries, 6% amputees and 24% other serious injuries.”

    (The Long-term Costs of Providing Veterans Medical Care and Disability Benefits, 2007)

    To find out more facts about the effects of war check out http://www.thefrontlines.com

  2. zyodei says:

    For the first time ever, we see a useful product of the Iraq war.

    Hail the triumph! Huzzahs all around! We have produced a cadre of curators for our army corps of engineers museum! A smashing success!

  3. rAMPANTiDIOCY says:

    funny. i thought everyone with brain injuries just worked for the army corps of engineers.

  4. JoshP says:

    Archaeology is really money intensive and this is really cool. I was amazed when I worked in a lab how much really neat stuff is warehoused, it just sits. And as far as money. Think how much you get payed at a desk job, then take some of that training and put a shovel in your hand and go stand out in a corn field for ten hours in august. Then imagine how much you have to pay one field technician.
    As an aside, during the heyday of moneyed government programs, TVA and etc, they flooded huge tracts of land. These lands were usually the fertile littoral areas where settlement was most popular. Thus, thousands of possible sites are right under skiers feet. But, water is a far better preservative than natural soil erosion, air and oxidation. So it’s kinda a tradeoff. In a hundred years or so our grand-archaeologists are gonna be diving these sites with modern equipment and doing really neat things.
    Given of course no Zombie Apocalypse.

  5. michaelpmason says:

    If you read between the lines, this article is also about the military trying to find vocational options for the more than 360,000 servicemembers who have returned from OIF/OEF with a brain injury.

  6. Anonymous says:

    I think archeologists should always be required to put everything back when they are done copying it.

    But then, I get pissed off when my wife leaves the cap off the toothpaste.

    Kudos to the Armed Forces for giving servicemen something better to do than killing people, and for finding work for people they’ve put in harm’s way in the past.

  7. Jardine says:

    Oh, so these are the people who take care of the stargate.

  8. Marja says:

    #3,

    Back in front of the bulldozers? 99% or so of archaeology is salvage work.

  9. Bellanatrix says:

    I’m amazed that anyone would make any jokes about traumatic brain injury. It is one of the most misunderstood injuries and is known as the silent disease.
    You cannot fathom how frustrating and difficult it can be to live with a TBI. I am one of those people.
    Do any of you also make jokes about amputees as well?

    • Cowicide says:

      Do any of you also make jokes about amputees as well?

      A man with no arms walked up to a bar and asked for a beer.

      The bartender shoved the foaming glass in front of him.

      “Look,” said the customer, “I have no arms – would you please hold the glass up to my mouth?”

      “Sure,” said the bartender, and he did.

      “Now,” said the customer, “I wonder if you’d be so kind as to get my handkerchief out of my pocket and wipe the foam off my mouth.”

      “Certainly.” And it was done.

      “If,” said the armless man, “you’d reach in my right hand pants pocket, you’ll find the money for the beer.”

      The bartender got it.

      “You’ve been very kind,” said the customer. “Just one thing more. Where is the men’s room?”

      “Out the door,” said the bartender, “turn left, walk two blocks, and there’s one in a filling station on the corner.”

    • Cowicide says:

      I’m amazed that anyone would make any jokes about traumatic brain injury. It is one of the most misunderstood injuries and is known as the silent disease.
      You cannot fathom how frustrating and difficult it can be to live with a TBI. I am one of those people.

      I’m sorry you’ve gone through a difficult experience and I do hope you are on a path to recovery for your TBI. I also think the joke from rAMPANTiDIOCY was unfunny and that’s why I gave my sarcastic reply to it (with drums). That said, this is the internet and filled with tons of people you cannot see or hear, for all we know rAMPANTiDIOCY is in a wheelchair or is someone who has had a TBI themselves and can fathom it quite well. In other words, try to lighten up a little.

Leave a Reply