Knife-brandishing yob in a hoodie openly menaces public just steps from Parliament

Discuss

33 Responses to “Knife-brandishing yob in a hoodie openly menaces public just steps from Parliament”

  1. Gutierrez says:

    Look more like a member of the Royal Chavalry to me.

  2. Robert says:

    Here’s what went through my mind, much to my later amusement:

    “Another post about violent youths in England. There’s no text. Just a picture of a guard on a horse. Where’s the yob? That’s a funny sign. What a dirty entrance way. I still don’t see the…. he-e-e-ey, wait a minute!”

  3. EricT says:

    Isn’t that actually Whitehall?

  4. cabalo'a says:

    This being a monarchy, he’s not a citizen, he’s a subject. Even if he were in a republic, he still wouldn’t be a citizen, because he’s a professional soldier.

    Either way, it’s a terrible gag. This isn’t going to be another of Cory’s banana-like detours is it?

    Just look at it…

    • Charlie Stross says:

      cabaloa: This being a monarchy, he’s not a citizen, he’s a subject. Even if he were in a republic, he still wouldn’t be a citizen, because he’s a professional soldier.

      Wrong on both counts. (a) British citizens are, indeed, citizens with rights — this isn’t a pure monarchy, it’s a constitutional monarchy — and (b) professional soldiers don’t renounce their citizenship when they sign up (although they take on additional duties and responsibilities).

      Cory’s point stands, though. If I happen to carry a Leatherman tool with a 3″ or longer locking blade in public without a bloody good excuse, I’m committing a serious criminal offense with a multi-year prison sentence attached; this guy, in contrast, get’s to menace the public with a three foot pig-sticker!

      Irony, irony, wherefore art thou, irony? (Not among the boinger commentariat …)

  5. Tagishsimon says:

    The first clue announcing the movement of Cory’s column from the Grauniad to the Daily Hate?

  6. Anonymous says:

    more importantly he’s pointing out that this man is carrying a very large blade. any other member of the general public carrying such a blade or even a blade a tenth of that ‘knife’ would find themselves in a tight spot with the law.

  7. Anonymous says:

    Sweet ride! What’s the bhp on that thing?

  8. Lester says:

    I love that sign. Simple and direct.

  9. Anonymous says:

    It *is* on Whitehall, but that is just along the road from Parliament.

    More specifically, it’s about halfway along Whitehall, at the entrance to the Horseguards building, which is… not so surprising, really.

  10. bellebouche says:

    ASBO for the horse, whilst we’re at it.

  11. OriGuy says:

    It could be worse. He could be carrying a camera.

  12. Anonymous says:

    Hahaha

  13. Joe Dunckley says:

    his horse has made a bit of a mess on the public highway, n all.

  14. star35 says:

    Yob was originally back slang (yob = boy). Ironically it is now part of the demonisation of boys.

    Recent research by Women in Journalism on regional and national newspaper reporting of “hoodies” shows that the word is most commonly interchanged with (in order of popularity) “yob”, “thug”, “lout” and “scum”.

  15. mycophage says:

    Meh. “Brandish” = “to shake or wave (as a weapon) menacingly”, which he’s clearly not doing. You can carry a weapon without brandishing it.

  16. mutikonka says:

    Didn’t you steal this idea from here?

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/10816453@N00/3728507013/

  17. mack says:

    “Last night, some hooligans tipped over a dustbin in Shaftesbury.”

  18. Camp Freddie says:

    Check out the bling on his baseball cap!

  19. MitchSchaft says:

    What’s a ruffian? :(

    • Beanolini says:

      What’s a ruffian?

      bully, gangster, goon;
      homeboy, hood, hoodlum;
      hooligan, mobster, mug;
      punk, roughneck, rowdy;
      thug, tough, toughie.

  20. Anonymous says:

    Read Robinson Crusoe for the first use of the word “yob”.

  21. Gilgongo says:

    Growing up in London, I recall the first time I saw a guardsman in front of Buckingham Palace, and it as a somewhat painful memory. We were visiting “the Queen’s house” – and of course I believed everyone loved the Queen. Nobody told me there were going to be scary, angry-looking men outside protecting her from people. I didn’t know anyone who would want to harm the Queen, but I concluded that perhaps the Queen wasn’t all that nice after all if she needed people to protect her. And come to think of it, why weren’t we allowed to even say hello to her?

    At the age of six or seven, the relationship between the rulers and the ruled suddenly hit me square between the eyes.

    • Antinous / Moderator says:

      Nobody told me there were going to be scary, angry-looking men outside protecting her from people.

      You find bright red tunics with gold braid and gigantic fur headdresses scary? It’s as if they dressed them up as extras from The Wizard of Oz to disempower them. Of course, the honor guard at Syntagma in Athens wears skirts, tasseled caps and shoes with giant pompoms.

  22. dculberson says:

    “Does this robe make me look fat?”

    Be careful giving an honest answer to a man carrying a sword.

  23. Anonymous says:

    could anyone explain to me what a yob and a hoodie are? i’m wearing a hoodie right now, so does that make me a “yob”? m’thinks its a British colloquialism

  24. Machineintheghost says:

    James Blunt was a captain in the Life Guards before he became a guitar-wielding T-shirt wearing singer.

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