What will the net do to institutions in the next 10 years?

The latest Pew Research Center Internet & American Life Project report is out: "The Impact of the Internet on Institutions in the Future" surveys 895 tech experts on the way that technology will change institutions (government, business, nonprofits, schools) in the next ten years. The responses -- presented as a series of free-form survey answers -- range from the incandescent to the outraged, but every one is thought-provoking. Unsurprising, given that respondents included Clay Shirky, Esther Dyson, Doc Searls, Nicholas Carr, Susan Crawford, David Clark, Jamais Cascio, Peter Norvig, Craig Newmark, Hal Varian, Howard Rheingold, Andreas Kluth, Jeff Jarvis, Andy Oram, Kevin Werbach, David Sifry, Dan Gillmor, Marc Rotenberg, Stowe Boyd, John Pike, Andrew Nachison, Anthony Townsend, Ethan Zuckerman, Tom Wolzien, Stephen Downes, Rebecca MacKinnon, Jim Warren, Sandra Brahman, Barry Wellman, Seth Finkelstein, Jerry Berman, Tiffany Shlain, and Stewart Baker.
"Having been a senior executive at some of America's largest corporations I am convinced that model is ultimately doomed. An entity that lasts forever and grows forever is just not possible and is silly anyway. It is a waste of resources. Society deserves a better model for the organization and deployment of resources to provide products and services. Scale is still important. Companies like Cisco have shown how to continue to innovate by acquisition, but the big question is how do corporations gracefully end? How can we break the cycle of Wall Street, a strong financial services industry is simply not good for society. Wall Street does not improve productivity, the model is parasitic, transferring huge resources out of the system. I am looking forward to the next phase of the industrial revolution." - Glen Edens, former senior vice president and director at Sun Microsystems Laboratories, chief scientist Hewlett Packard
The Impact of the Internet on Institutions in the Future | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project
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