Making chemicals kosher

Discuss

67 Responses to “Making chemicals kosher”

  1. OoerictoO says:

    note also that this article states, in plain english that regular coke IS NOT VEGETARIAN.

    perhaps we should all be thinking about this with regards to all of our “food”, in that, at times, we know not, what is in it.

    • Matt Deckard says:

      What article did you read? This article states clearly and in plain English that Coke has been vegetarian since the 1930′s.

  2. SB-129 says:

    It amazes me that in 2010 people still find themselves having to worry about 2000+ year old dietary rules and regulations and reduce them as to whether individual hydrocarbon molecules are kosher etc. not just getting at the jews here but i beleive most of the weird middle-eastern food cultures are based upon the total lack of food hygeine in the old days so indeed its a good idea not to eat pork 2000 years ago given the lack of refrigeration but seriously guys its OK to eat in 2010. god knows how we managed it despite centuries of religion, but we have the technology to make it safe!

    ditch your religions and LOSE YOUR CHAINS!

    • Snig says:

      Insects are commonly eaten in other cultures. They’re not commonly eaten in the US. Sure, it was once unsafe to eat them, but certainly you can do it safely now. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entomophagy
      You give up pork for the more environmentally correct white meat of grub, I’ll talk to an orthodox friend about having some ham.

    • technogeek says:

      I know, I shouldn’t respond to the troll, but I’m going to make one single comment for the sake of education:

      What you’re missing, I think, is that people aren’t “worrying” about the rules. They’ve adopted those rules voluntarily as a matter of culture — just as you’ve undoubtedly adopted many “just because” rules and practices voluntarily because they’re part of _your_ culture (*). For example, I observe some religious holidays and practices not because I consider them divinely mandated, but because I have the freedom to do so and like maintaining those traditions — they’re part of my heritage, and while I don’t use them every day I do like to dust them off and admire them once or twice a year.

      More generally: Please remember that most folks have heard all the arguments pro and con. They have already come to a _considered_ conclusion of how they want to approach religion or its absence. They’re as unlikely to be swayed by your arguments as you are by theirs. Grant them the same respect you would like from them, by not getting in their faces about it unless they actively want to discuss it with you. If it doesn’t appeal to you, that’s fine; do what does and let others follow their own paths.

      “Be kind to each other. The rest is commentary.”

      • RedShirt77 says:

        Good golly, I make a few jokes about the sillyness of their being supernatural importance to the minute chemicals in a coke and suddenly I am a troll.

        Just watch this

        http://boingboing.net/2009/06/06/evolution-religion-s.html

        Like notthemessiah says: There’s no god. Now stop worrying and enjoy your life.

      • benher says:

        It’s not a troll because he doesn’t agree with the practice.

        Sez he:
        “It amazes me that in 2010 people still find themselves having to worry about 2000+ year old dietary rules and regulations and reduce them as to whether individual hydrocarbon molecules are kosher etc.”

        Frankly, it amazes me too. Calling it “culture” instead of “antiquated religious practice” doesn’t somehow make it impervious to the intellectual scrutiny of others.

  3. ahankinson says:

    For such a self-proclaimed enlightened lot, there seems to be a lot of proselytizing in this thread to “free your bonds” of religious captivity. Atheism became a religion, not when it denounced the existence of God, but when it started actively recruiting others to join.

    You know what? Religious people are higher functioning, often extremely intelligent people. They have different reasons for believing what they believe. They may like the ceremony. They may like the institutionalized focus on “the other” instead of “the self.” They may believe that it’s all allegory, told to achieve an effect, or they may believe in the literal interpretation. But don’t for a minute think that there aren’t many, many of them that don’t think long, hard and critically about their beliefs. They just arrive at different conclusions than you do.

    In my mind, shouting “ditch your religion, LOSE YOUR CHAINS” or the equivalent is absolutely no different than shouting “Jesus is life, YOU NEED TO BE SAVED.” Different words, but both exhibit the same need for social justification that you’re right, and everyone else is wrong.

    • benher says:

      “Atheism became a religion, not when it denounced the existence of God, but when it started actively recruiting others to join.”

      Says who, you? I don’t go door to door recruiting ‘unbelievers.’ Nobody does. What, you think just because someone proclaims their non-belief in a couple sentences on the net that they’ve somehow penned a dogmatic doctrine akin to say, that of the catholic church? You’re equivocation is absolutely baseless.

    • Anonymous says:

      Atheism became a religion, not when it denounced the existence of God, but when it started actively recruiting others to join.

      Atheism became a religion when it developed a coherent doctrine, reconciling previously disparate versions like Secular Humanism, Objectivism, and Marxism. I think it happened right after the second coming.

      • RedShirt77 says:

        >Atheism became a religion when it developed a coherent doctrine, reconciling previously disparate versions like Secular Humanism, Objectivism, and Marxism. I think it happened right after the second coming.

        Yeah, I think you get it. A lack of belief can’t be a religion. Seclar humanism is a philosophy and could become a religion if it started requiring belief through faith. But it won’t be until the second comming before anything like that is needed.

    • JoshuaZ says:

      For such a self-proclaimed enlightened lot, there seems to be a lot of proselytizing in this thread to “free your bonds” of religious captivity.

      So? I fail how to see how that inherently makes one less enlightened. Whatever enlightened means it almost certainly shouldn’t mean “leave everyone alone to do their own thing even when it is self-destructive and rests on factually incorrect premises about how the universe functions.”

      Atheism became a religion, not when it denounced the existence of God, but when it started actively recruiting others to join.

      Huh? So now anything that actively recruits is a religion? Aside from the fact that there’s very little active recruitment of people towards atheism, this is a pretty silly definition. Mathematicians are always trying to get more undergraduates to become math majors. Is math a religion? This same argument holds for a lot of other academic fields. And sports fans do the same thing. And D&D players. If this is your working criterion than pretty close to everything is a religion.

      You know what? Religious people are higher functioning, often extremely intelligent people. They have different reasons for believing what they believe. They may like the ceremony. They may like the institutionalized focus on “the other” instead of “the self.” They may believe that it’s all allegory, told to achieve an effect, or they may believe in the literal interpretation. But don’t for a minute think that there aren’t many, many of them that don’t think long, hard and critically about their beliefs. They just arrive at different conclusions than you do.

      Ok, I’m going to respond to that in my capacity as an atheist who regularly goes to religious services and kosher for passover. In that capacity, regarding your above paragraph: screw that. Liking ceremony is not a reason by itself to believe something is true. Nor is liking a focus on “the other” whatever the heck that means. Nor does thinking something is an allegory explain anything in a useful fashion (an allegory for what? And if it is an allegory then why the ridiculous restrictions on food consumption and a lot of others that are simply inconvenient for both oneself and bystanders?).

      I’m not going to address the issue in detail of literal interpretation except to note that in Judaism that particular issue is much more complicated than it is in Christianity (roughly speaking “literal interpretation” isn’t even a theologically well-defined term in Judaism). However, you can’t just say “They just arrive at different conclusions than you do” as some sort of defense. It doesn’t work. The vast majority of people who are religious are the same religions as their parents. People aren’t getting their by conclusions (generally, there are some exceptions) but rather by simply following what everyone else does and producing rationalizations for it if they even bother to think about. And as someone who has spent a lot of time around Orthodox Jews, let be very clear: some of them have thought about their beliefs quite a bit. But a lot haven’t. For example, lot of even nominally Orthodox Jews don’t know anything about the Document Hypothesis or if they’ve heard of it know it vaguely as that evil thing that those wretched atheist academics came up with to their destroy their faith in God. And similar remarks apply to other issues that have even a small chance of harming their confidence. See for example Alexander Nussbaum’s study http://alturl.com/9qka which showed that by one measure around a quarter of Orthodox undergraduates think that scientists know that evolution is false and that scientists are actively lying about it (see also Nussbaum’s article . Do you really think that people are reaching those conclusions by careful thinking? (Note that an almost equal fraction of Orthodox Jews actually accept evolution and don’t think it creates a problem with their religion. Orthodoxy is not a monolith even it does have large fractions of the population which has really conspiratorial views about science). Or consider the ultra-Orthodox Jews who believe in spontaneous generation of mice based on various Talmudic sources. Do I have to give some automatic credit that they’ve really thought about that belief and that that conclusion is somehow worthy of respect?

      In my mind, shouting “ditch your religion, LOSE YOUR CHAINS” or the equivalent is absolutely no different than shouting “Jesus is life, YOU NEED TO BE SAVED.” Different words, but both exhibit the same need for social justification that you’re right, and everyone else is wrong.

      First of all, these religious chains can actively harm bystanders. Take example ultra-Orthodox attitudes towards science have actively harmed people. The recent mumps outbreak in New York which effected primarily Orthodox Jews may have had a successful purchase due to lower vaccination rates in the ultra-Orthodox population. This infected people who were not even part of the Orthodox community but had contact with them. There have been other examples of disease outbreaks that have been traced to other religious groups (such as some New Agers) who refuse to vaccinate. So when religious beliefs are actively harming bystanders, you’ll forgive me if I understand why people care.

      Moreover, here you are doing a disservice to both the preaching atheist and the evangelical. If you think that people are actively harming themselves with their beliefs, you should convince them otherwise. Indeed, the evangelicals who preach that only accepting Jesus will save us from hellfire are trying to save us. They are given the information they have doing the most moral thing they can. (There’s a strange detail here that they are being more moral than their deity. The deity they believe in is willing to send people to hell. They are not). Of course they should be warning us and preaching to us. They’d be horrible people not to. So yes, let the atheist argue for people to give up religion and let the preacher preach to people. And let a thousand voices bloom. But don’t condemn either simply because you don’t like the message.

  4. Stefan Jones says:

    @SkullHyphy: Because without subsidies the struggling yeoman family farmers who are the only Real Americans would die off.

    But mostly because Monsanto, ConAgra, and other agricultural giants bribe congresspeople to keep the subsidies in place.

  5. OoerictoO says:

    okay, so i just went and found the CURRENT ingredients. no glycerin listed. although they do list “natural flavors”, so my previous statement stands.

    ingredient list from: http://productnutrition.thecoca-colacompany.com/products/coca-cola#ingredients

    * CARBONATED WATER,
    * HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP,
    * CARAMEL COLOR,
    * PHOSPHORIC ACID,
    * NATURAL FLAVORS,
    * CAFFEINE

  6. Euryale says:

    The people in this thread who are trotting out the “religious dietary laws are stupid” argument are missing one thing:

    Without stupid religious dietary laws, a lot of people wouldn’t have access to the deliciousness that is Passover Coke even once a year. And that would be sad.

  7. Alan says:

    If you are lucky enough and live near enough to Waco (okay, it’s hard to be lucky and live near Waco, I know), you can get Dr. Pepper made with pure cane sugar.

  8. Alex_M says:

    Well, why stop at molecules? Why not ATOMS?

    Of course, statistically every bite you eat of every food, should have at LEAST one atom that was once part of a pig. (and quite possibly a complete molecule or two)

    Which doesn’t say much other than how very many atoms there are in any macroscopic amount of stuff.

    • Anonymous says:

      Please be aware that using the simplified formulae E=MC^2, and overwhelming evidence from LHC’s we can see that Mass and energy are interchangeable, as such many fundemental particles can be represented as forms of both energy and mass (e.g. electron).

      Also we know using Heizenburgs uncertanty principle that you cannot know where an electron is at any given point, this along with a relatively basic understanding of chemistry and ecology, and the knowledge of the age of this world.

      The odds are overwhelming that at some point some part of whatever you intend to eat (for consistency I am sticking with electron) is non-kosher.

      My advice: Just eat the food you need, I tend to enjoy a good curry once in a while, and a roast every sunday when possible, game pies when its shooting season, you get my drift, a nice turkey to celibrate the beginning of a pagan festival (as expected by society), turkey sandwiches/soup/curry/risoto/etc for the rest of the festival.

      And if your beliefs require it, be sorry afterwards. The alternative is not to eat, which I’ve never really tried. I’ve been doing the eating thing for well over 20 years, could someone who’s got a similar experience with not eating get back to me on how it works.

  9. PaulR says:

    So let me get this straight: since molecules can be non-kosher or combinations thereof might be non-kosher, then you can’t eat or any mammal. Since milk molecules (y’know, the amino acids?) are present in the meat…

    Ham’n’cheese sandwich, anyone?

  10. sirkowski says:

    Someone produced kosher porn in Israel once. I wonder how that worked.

  11. A Nonny Moose says:

    So am I to believe that any soda I see on the shelf is kosher for passover and contains no high fructose corn syrup?

    If this is accurate, it’s a good thing to know, even though I’m not Jewish.

    • Maggie Koerth-Baker says:

      That is correct, A Nonny Moose.

      • technogeek says:

        This used to be a standard trick for getting something much closer to _real_ Original Coke, which used cane sugar (glucose) rather than corn syrup (glucose/fructose mix) — wait until passover, then stock up.

        The other approach was to import from Canada. Canada doesn’t have corn subsidies, so cane sugar is cheaper there.

        Recently, a number of companies have been moving back to sucrose, though they haven’t always updated their labels (with the exception of a few who are advertising this as the improvement it is). But if you want to be sure, go for the passover batch or the imports.

        (I’m mostly drinking diet sodas these days, or you can bet your bippy I’d buy a case or two this week. Might do so anyway so I have it in stock for guests.)

      • Matt Deckard says:

        >> So am I to believe that any soda (ed: with a yellow cap) I see on the shelf is kosher for passover and contains no high fructose corn syrup?

        >That is correct, A Nonny Moose.

        No, that is not correct! Only Coke bottles with a yellow cap are Kosher for Passover. Other brands like Pepsi use yellow caps for their regular soda so, as JamesPadraicR noted, their Kosher for Passover bottles use white caps. The easiest way to be totally sure is to either look at the ingredient list or look for the K(P) marking on the cap.

        Now can someone explain to me the Kosher for Passover Diet Coke they’re peddling this year? Diet Coke doesn’t normally contain HFCS so how is it different?

        • LILemming says:

          > Diet Coke doesn’t normally contain HFCS so how is it different?

          At a guess they’re promising that it wasn’t bottled on a machine that has had HFCS ran through it since it was last cleaned.

  12. A Nonny Moose says:

    @me^: That should have said “soda with a yellow cap”.

    Proofreading FAIL.

  13. TJ S says:

    If only we could get sucrose-sweetened soda all year round. Or even better, untreated cane sugar. Mmm…real sugar.

    I’m trying to ween myself off of HFCS as much as possible. Since I live in America, and I don’t have the money to do all my shopping at Whole Foods (or similar), I know this is an impossible task, but I’m working on it.

    (In my first three months of quitting HFCS soda, I lost 5 lbs, without any other lifestyle changes. I know it’s anecdotal, but that says something to me. (I replaced soda with water, unsweetened tea, and Pepsi/Mtn Dew “Throwback”. I also recently discovered the CostCo near me has sugar-sweetened Coke in glass bottles. Wonderful!)

    • jackie31337 says:

      It’s very likely your weight loss was due to replacing caloric drinks with non-caloric ones. It can be surprising how many extra calories drinks can add up to.

    • Steaming Pile says:

      Well, in order to use sugar in making soda, you first have to make a simple syrup from it. That makes it basically sucrose and water.

      And you know what’s the deal-breaker for me on HFCS? Those insulting commercials from the corn industry. You know, the one where the dirty hippie goes ‘durrrr’ when asked by the undercover industry hack what the big deal is. Yeah, the corn industry knows what’s best for us, and anyone who says otherwise is a stupid farking idiot. Unconvincing FAIL that could easily have come from one of those Fox News bimbos with the bleach blonde hair and fake boobs.

  14. Anonymous says:

    Good now Jews that drink this urological poison
    might be candidates for Bladder cancer due to the
    Phosphoric acid, just ask any Urologist about this.

    How does this crap stay around all over the world
    for these many years.

  15. Reed Savory says:

    Just a recommendation: whether or not you are Jewish if you like Coca-Cola you’ve got to try “Passover Coke”.

    The use of sucrose instead of corn syrup gives the soda this great caramel flavor that I remember Coke having back when I was a young kid in the late 70s, but which has been long gone from the taste of the product since they switched-over to corn syrup in the mid 80s.

  16. Rich Keller says:

    I thought at first that the yellow cap on kosher Coke was a reference to the yellow hats that Jews wore during the middle ages when outside the ghetto.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_hat

  17. kobrakai says:

    If you think Kosher Coke is good, you need to have Mexican Coke. Only in glass bottles (which is a plus), expensive (usually over US$1.50 per bottle) but it is made with real sugar. Cool one over night in the back, bottom of your fridge and 10 minutes before you drink it, put it in the freezer. Absolute Coca Cola bliss!

    • GlenBlank says:

      On Mexican Coke: Make sure the ingredients list says “cane sugar” and not just “sugar.” Bottles that just say “sugar” may (or may not) contain HFCS, depending on what the bottler had on hand that day.

  18. AirPillo says:

    Thank you for posting this! It reminded me I need to go pick up some delicious kosher Coca-Cola before it’s all gone again (it just tastes better than the corn syrup stuff…)

  19. LILemming says:

    Actually it’s a bit more complicated than Passover=no corn syrup.

    1) The corn=bad for Passover is an Eastern European tradition. Spanish tradition is different. Most US Jews are from the Eastern Europe tradition whereas Israel is largely Spanish. So there are many Passover products that contain corn syrup.

    2) Corn syrup=corn is an issue of debate amongst scholars of the Eastern Europe tradition. So, for example, the back of a box of Joyva marshmallows has an essay on this subject in order to appeal to the Eastern European tradition.

    3) There’s also a debate (smaller than the one above) about how there really isn’t any basis in the Torah for corn=bad and maybe the Spanish guys have it right.

    So if one wishes to avoid HFCS it still pays to loose at the ingredients.

    That said, yellow cap coke is Sugar, passover Dr. Brown’s is sugar and I believe Passover Pepsi is also sugar. Pepsi and Coke only has passover beverages in 2 liter bottles whereas Dr. Brown’s also has it in cans.

    The personal irony is that for most of the year I rarely drink soda but during Passover tend to over-indulge in it.

    • coaxial says:

      So LILemming so bronze age rules are collapsing under the weight of the modern era because the rules literally have no concept of the things they’re trying to be applied to?

      Shocking. Shocking.

    • Shay Guy says:

      For anyone else who’s curious, the relevant term is “kitniyot.” You shouldn’t be surprised to find that this involves lots of arguments between rabbis.

  20. Euryale says:

    There was no Kosher Coke to be had anywhere in my area this year, much to my dismay. Last year was the first year they’d had any in any of the stores around, but I guess I was the only one who stocked up. And there is never any Mexican Coke. Next time I’m down in the City I’ll have to buy a ton of the latter. It is so delicious.

  21. RedShirt77 says:

    What a stupid and insane being God must be to care what is in soda when he has an entire universe to look after.

    Guess what, if god is this Anal about this level of detail, you are going to hell. Have a beer.

    • Rich Keller says:

      But, Benjamin Franklin said that beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy…

      And then the song says that in heaven there is no beer…

      Now I’m just beginning to get a hint of how scholars can make life-long careers out of finer points of distinction like this.

  22. JamesPadraicR says:

    The yellow cap must be regional, because the Passover Pepsi I have (the only Passover soda available in my bit of Colorado) has a white cap with KP on it, and it’s made with sugar.

    As for animal derived chemicals, there is some argument. Some Rabbis consider gelatin to be kosher even if it is made from pig bits -they say it’s so far removed from its origin that it’s no longer pork. However, most Kosher gelatin is made from beef or chicken (afaik), or seaweed derived agar is used.

    Also some consider corn syrup okay for Passover, I assume as long as it’s not corn flour it’s allowed.

    Then there’s the whole Ashkenaz-Sephardic argument -rice and beans allowed or not.

  23. ricksterhipster says:

    All that trouble for making chemical goo that kills your insides? How about plain ole’ water? I’m pretty sure that’s kosher.

  24. EvilSpirit says:

    @15: Remember that corn isn’t the only non-kosher ingredient at issue. Presumably the kosher Diet Coke uses cotton-seed oil glycerin instead of the animal product.

    • Matt Deckard says:

      No, if it was made with the non-kosher glycerin it then regular Diet Coke wouldn’t even be kosher period. But it is. So my question is what makes Kosher for Passover Diet Coke different from regular Diet Coke? Presumably there is some ingredient in Diet Coke that is kosher generally, but not for Passover. I’m wondering what that ingredient is.

  25. lewis stoole says:

    do they check to see if the sucrose is filtered through bone char?

  26. Anonymous says:

    One thing that a number of commenters (that presumably were raised in non-Jewish households) are missing is that one would be hard-pressed to find a Jew that believes the dietary and other laws come directly from G-d.

    Rather, the laws as enacted are generally interpretations and riffs by rabbis on the word of G-d as recorded in scripture. So, while, for example, “don’t eat pork, pigs are unclean” is straight out of Leviticus, the whole meat-milk two-sets-of-dishes thing is an interpretation of the commandment in the same place not to boil a kid in its own mother’s milk. (And why is chicken, a non-mammal, considered meat under the dietary laws? A rabbi around 1000 AD decided someone might see your chicken with cream sauce and think you were eating veal, thus bringing discredit to the Jews).

    The cool part is that the debates of the various rabbis who have hashed the rules out over the years are preserved in the text of the Talmud, which is formatted as several concentric rings of marginalia from famous rabbis around the original text written by other famous rabbis.

    I have found that non-Jews have a great deal of difficulty grasping quite how profoundly different this attitude of accepting religious ritual as something crafted mindfully by humans over millennia, which pervades to the core of religious observance, is from both Catholic and Protestant doctrine.

  27. LiudvikasT says:

    Religious stupidity has no bounds. If we go by this logic, then every single food is non-kosher. There are non-kosher atoms, and of course non-kosher electrons. Everything is non-kosher, please don’t eat people, if religious people die out, there will be better sane/insane people ratio.

    • JoshuaZ says:

      Religious stupidity has no bounds. If we go by this logic, then every single food is non-kosher. There are non-kosher atoms, and of course non-kosher electrons.

      This isn’t exactly the case. The rules of kashrut essentially depend on whether or not taste in any meaningful sense is preserved. There’s some argument over what exactly this means. But it is quite clear that an electron (and a single atom) cannot have any defined kashrut status.

      Everything is non-kosher, please don’t eat people,

      I’m not sure what you mean by this. But note that people actually be default were kosher. This is debated in the Talmud. The Rabbis responded by declaring humans to be non-Kosher at a Rabbinic level. Note that this has actual applications to kashrut observance since for some purposes substances which are only Rabbinicaly prohibited have weaker transmission rules than those which are considered to be derived from the direct Biblical law.


      if religious people die out, there will be better sane/insane people ratio.

      While we discussed a few Boinbboing threads ago the fact that atheists in general are smarter, in fact, the evidence doesn’t support any strong connection between religiosity and mental illness in this way. See for example Religiosity and emotional disturbance: A test of Ellis’s thesis in his own counseling center.
      Sharkey, Paul W.; Malony, H. Newton
      Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training. Vol 23(4), Win 1986, 640-641 which showed that no correlation between religiosity and mental illness. If anything, more studies suggest that mental illness is more common among the less religious. Example studies include Crawford, M. E., Handal, P. J., & Wiener, R. (1989). The relationship between religion and mental health/distress. Review of Religious Research, 31(1), 16–22. Since Crawford’s study there have been follow-up studies with larger samples. Depending on the metric used, they have either found no relationship at all between religosity levels and mental illness or found that less religious is associated with more mental illness.

      (Disclaimer: While I’ve read both these studies before, I didn’t remember the exact citations and so had to Google to find them.)

      • LiudvikasT says:

        It’s some time after your reply, but I only now noticed it. So I don’t know if you’ll find this.

        I’m not saying that atheists are smarter, I’m saying that practically everybody is smarter than religious fundamentalists.
        While that might not be a recognizable mental condition, I’m still of an opinion that some religious practices are not a sign of mental health. Those religious people who are reasonable enough dismiss those practices, but there always those who want to follow the old ways. Kosher is a great example, even if I believed in god, I would not believe that he had any interest in what we eat.

        • Ugly Canuck says:

          But we are what we eat!

        • JoshuaZ says:

          Liud, you seem to be confusing how smart people are with their mental health state. Someone can be quite smart and still be batshit insane. Someone can also be a bit dumb and quite slow. In fact, atheists are more intelligent than the general population by a number of metrics and that the less religious people are the more intelligent they are likely to be(see for example http://alturl.com/6wry http://alturl.com/n8ob http://alturl.com/6wry/pw=Nequr and http://alturl.com/breq/). However, the evidence shows no similar result for mental health. Indeed, some studies actually suggest a slight correlation in the opposite direction especially in regards to rates of clinical depression.

          The notion that if there were a deity that deity would not care about what one ate is a conclusion. I don’t know how having one opinion or another says about levels of sanity rather than just statements about the nature of one’s worldview. Moreover, I suspect that there are systems of dietary restrictions that you wouldn’t find as implausible for a deity (say a deity that insisted on vegetarianism or had a rule against eating babies). In any case, believing in the plausibility of what would happen in the counterfactual case of such a deity’s existence doesn’t say much about either intelligence or mental health.

  28. IWood says:

    Bless the blade that kills the tree that gives us glycerol ester of wood rosin!!! OR have God hate us all. Your choice, really.

  29. libraryboi says:

    Wouldn’t it be easier just to change religions? The Flying Spaghetti Monster doesn’t require adherence to any archaic dietary rules.

    • Anonymous says:

      Not true! FSM requires the consumption of noodles. Delicious, delicious noodles!

      This is why we refer to Him as His Noodly Goodness, His Noodly Appendage, etc.

  30. SkullHyphy says:

    So why is corn subsidized?

  31. Micah says:

    There’s a lot of confusion in this thread (and the original article) over a couple of only tangentially related things.

    First there is the issue of certifying food ingredients (including chemicals) as kosher. Coke was an early pioneer in kosher certification of mass produced processed food, as illustrated by the animal vs. vegetable glycerin story. This has nothing to do with Passover, corn, sugar or HFCS, but is a year-round issue for Big Food companies. If you want a “hechsher” (a symbol indicating kosher certification) on your product’s packaging, you have to make sure that every ingredient you use is certified kosher and that a representative of the organizations that own the trademarks on the most popular hechshers–OU, OK, CRC, Star-K, etc.–has inspected your production facilities and signed off on everything.

    Pretty much all American-made Coke is kosher, whether or not it contains HFCS, so there is definitely not any mammal or bird derived glycerin included (because even if there was glycerin from a kosher slaughtered mammal or bird, it would make Coke a meat product and Coke does not have a meat hechsher). Note, however, that this doesn’t necessarily mean Coke or other non-meat kosher products are vegetarian, as kosher glycerin, gelatin and other food additives can come from kosher fish without making the product a meat product (fish are neither meat nor dairy for purposes of kosher rules surrounding mixing meat and dairy).

    Second there is the issue of kosher-for-Passover Coke, which is where corn, HFCS and sugar come into play. To get the Passover P added to your hechsher, you need to first have a kosher product, and then you have to completely scrub all your production equipment and eliminate any “chametz” (generally speaking, grain-based) ingredients. Yes, there is some debate about whether corn syrup is chametz, since today’s corn (aka maize) is a New World plant and was therefore unknown to the sages who codified the basic Passover dietary laws. But the generally-accepted Ashkenaz (Eastern European) view is that corn is a grain and as such is not allowed during Passover, so none of the big American kosher certification groups will give a K-for-P hechsher to products containing corn (including HFCS).

    • RedShirt77 says:

      “since today’s corn (aka maize) is a New World plant and was therefore unknown to the sages who codified the basic Passover dietary laws. ”

      Funny that god was completely ignorant of the new world foods. Kinda makes you wonder.

      • jacques45 says:

        At the risk of feeding the troll….

        You should read what you’re responding to. Let me bold the part of the quote you appeared to miss:

        “since today’s corn (aka maize) is a New World plant and was therefore unknown to the sages who codified the basic Passover dietary laws. “

  32. notthemessiah says:

    There’s no god. Now stop worrying and enjoy your life.

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