How ACTA will change the world's internet laws

Discuss

12 Responses to “How ACTA will change the world's internet laws”

  1. Anonymous says:

    Oh well I guess I’m going to jail…

  2. Anonymous says:

    I thought it’d be neat to ask the U.S. Trade Representative what the benefits and costs of this agreement might be. You can ask him too!

    http://www.ustr.gov/about-us/press-office/ask-ambassador

    Please be civil. Mr. Kirk only likes nice questions…

  3. snsr says:

    The most frightening aspect of the ACTA, aside from the corrupt nature in which USTR Ron Kirk is handling the “negotiation”, is an increase in secondary liability.

    Making ISPs, web sites, blogs, etc legally culpable for content and comments generated by their users is fucking ridiculous. This, combined with *preemptive injunctions against possible future infringers* amounts to wholesale censorship of protected speech by private parties.

  4. Anonymous says:

    The last gasps of the old dying elite. Ahhk how will we protect glove manefacktur without the strong oaken walls of the guild hall………………………

  5. lizuka says:

    One can never have enough information about ACTA, here’s a bit more just in case:
    http://www.laquadrature.net/en/ACTA
    Good job you guys often talk about this dark subject here on BB!

  6. Kerov says:

    Crickets.

    And on a board where “information wants to be free” activists are over-represented, no less.

    We’re screwed. Absent a major PR faux pas — unlikely, given that the media mega-corps can afford the best PR talent in the world — ACTA will pass without much fuss or notice.

    Because although everybody always says “read the fine print”, nobody ever does. We can’t be bothered. It’s boring.

    We’re screwed.

  7. Kerov says:

    Oh. I stand corrected. There may be hope :)

  8. jo3lr0ck5 says:

    Why is none of this on the news, how are the peole supposed to know what is going on if they have to go reading from blog to blog?? This needs to come out in the papers or TV; if the people don’t know what is going on then how can they show that this is not something they want to support?

    We need to find a way to inform the masses!!

    • hijukal says:

      It’s not on the news because it is in the media conglomerates’ best interests not to broadcast it to a wider audience who will justifiably be outraged.

      But what can we do about it, other than bitching about it? Vote out the leaders who bring it in? It’ll be too late then and parliamentary members don’t have a choice in the matter anyway.

      The only thing we can do is to stop consuming the very media they’re trying to protect. Which is much easier said than done.

    • kaleesh says:

      “”Why is none of this on the news, how are the peole supposed to know what is going on if they have to go reading from blog to blog?? This needs to come out in the papers or TV; if the people don’t know what is going on then how can they show that this is not something they want to support?

      We need to find a way to inform the masses!!””

      hehe… the secret nature of the treaty – it will get media into trouble – fines, legal action, shutdowns – if they talk about this. go to any major english newspaper of the many acta countries – either it’s not reported or it is spun in a way to say “under this law, content creators will enjoy a golden age of renaissance where they will be paid for their work and there will be zero piracy” – with no mention of the loss of personal privacy, deep packet sniffing, the 3 strikes.

      I understand they need to be paid – blood sweat and tears to create content. And I don’t completely disagree with this agreement. Heck, if i did some work i need to paid for and someone stole it, i’d be fuming as well. However, consider these issues:

      - DRM

      - Cannot play in our preferred devices and if we change formats to do so, we are also in the red – i buy CDs and i rip it to put in my mp3 player – i’m screwed right?

      - cross-border restrictions on media – content not available out of US is not available in USA (like iTunes – different countries have different rules)

      - no easy way to purchase stuff (no credit cards for under 18s)

      - no improvements in id theft and credit card frauds protection

      - the exorbitant prices of media – not accessible but who doesn’t want to be entertained?

      - if they don’t make it easy to consume legally and they eliminate illegal ways to obtain content, where exactly do they make money? what if people boycott? what if they avoid going to movies and buy secondhand or rent a dvd for $2 a day when it comes out in the format of their choice?

  9. Anonymous says:

    Hi Corey
    Interesting post. Kim Weatherall has also given her incisive comments on the upcoming negotiations at http://fortnightlyreview.info/2010/04/09/anti-counterfeiting-trade-agreement-negotiations-enter-the-next-round-but-will-this-acta-have-a-finale/

  10. Anonymous says:

    I see a grimm future ahead of us all…

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