Carrot rainbow

Discuss

33 Responses to “Carrot rainbow”

  1. Anonymous says:

    Queen Anne’s Lace are wild carrots. And they (the roots) look more like skinny parsnips. But take care because the foliage of hemlock (killer plant) looks v. similar.

  2. benher says:

    It reminds me of how some Japanese southern sweet potatoes are like bright purple on the inside… even though the skin is identical to the potatoes with yellowish insides. Slice up both varieties into long thin strips and then fry together in fist sized bunches for a colorful tasty snack…

    I’m going to go eat before I get even further off topic…

  3. ryanrafferty says:

    One of those is hemlock… let’s play carrot roulette.

  4. Anonymous says:

    It wasn’t until I moved to Holland that I ever considered there to be more than two types of carrots (carrots and baby carrots). The Dutch have wortel, peen, winterpeen, bospeen… and a few more.

  5. loonquawl says:

    This image was selected as picture of the day on the English Wikipedia for June 17, 2006

  6. Inventorjack says:

    It was only about a year ago that I learned carrots came in colors other than orange. I want to get my hands on some of these other colors. Wish the grocery store carried them.

  7. JDMcDonnell says:

    Please let me be the first to say…
    Ehhh, What’s Up Doc?

  8. tamgoddess says:

    Sorry, I just have to say this. I know it’s annoying, but it’s like I have Grammar Tourette’s: “The reason is that,” not “the reason is because.”

    Again, sorry. Sorry. And sorry if my punctuation or spelling is wrong. I’m just sorry.

  9. Colored Carrot Chronicle says:

    It’s nice to see our friend, the colored carrot, getting some love in the mainstream — which is the goal of our blog. Though I see some 30 comments above mine, which is GREAT, it seems the bulk of the population is still largely unaware of the existence of these equally beautiful and tasty taproots.

    Thanks for broaching the subject, Cory and boingboing.

    http://www.coloredcarrots.com/

  10. Anonymous says:

    Orange carrots were around long before the 16th C

    Check out the history section in the World Carrot Museum and see an image from ad 512

    Also the baby carrot debaye is there – there are 2 kinds – “Baby Cut” carrots and true baby carrots.

    Wew!

  11. Anonymous says:

    Wild carrots are yellowy-orange, and while the change from purplish to bright orange did occur in the Netherlands in the 1600s, the “William of Orange” tale is a myth. From http://www.carrotmuseum.co.uk/history3.html

    “A tale, probably apocryphal, has it that the orange carrot was bred in the Netherlands in the seventeenth century to honour William of Orange. Though the stabilised orange carrot does date from around the seventeenth century Netherlands, it is unlikely that honouring William of Orange had anything to do with it! It is said, (without much historical reference) that the orange carrot was developed in Holland as a tribute to William I of Orange during the Dutch fight for independence from Spain in the 16th century. The orange carrot, not only had a better taste, did not leech its colour into cookware, but also had beta carotene making it healthier, and so all other carrots stopped being planted. Some astute historian managed to install the myth that the work an unexpected mutation was developed especially to thank William of Orange for achieving independence from Spain.”

  12. pidg says:

    I seem to recall reading that orange carrots became predominant because through selective “breeding”, because they’re easier to find when you’re digging them up.

  13. tabardite says:

    you can grow them yourself if you can’t find them in the store. it’s way cheaper. territorial seed company has a number of different colors for sale. it might be late to start carrots this season, though.

  14. starbreiz says:

    I love purple carrots, but I still find white carrots odd. (I have a container garden, but I’ve also gotten purple carrots in my CSA box). I like my salads of vivid color.

  15. apoxia says:

    I grew white and purple carrots as well as orange carrots this year. The purple ones were really fibrous and we couldn’t really eat them raw in salads.

    For Anon #3 who mentioned baby carrots – is this a popular American product? I’ve never seen them in New Zealand. I do know, however, that baby carrots sold in the US are just regular size carrots paired down to a small size (I read this in a Marion Nestle book). In New Zealand baby carrots come covered in dirt with long roots and green tops. Those are real baby carrots.

    • Antinous / Moderator says:

      I do know, however, that baby carrots sold in the US are just regular size carrots paired down to a small size

      Wrong. Baby carrots are about as big around as your finger. They’re much more flavorful and tender than big carrots. http://tinyfarmblog.com/baby-veggies-go-to-market/

      Those little, peeled things are to baby carrots as Peanut Butterâ„¢ is to peanut butter, an agribusiness euphemism.

      • apoxia says:

        Antinous those baby carrots you linked to are indeed baby carrots. The ones I was referring to are the ones that comes in plastic wrappers and don’t resemble an actual vegetable taken from the earth. Those are the pared down regular size carrots – processed vegetables if you will.

    • Jerril says:

      The purple ones were really fibrous and we couldn’t really eat them raw in salads.

      How do they compare to parsnips? Also not particularly popular raw, interesting texture, but I’ve loved them raw (or cooked) since being a little kid.

      I was a weird little kid, mind you, but still, sounds like I might be interested in purple carrots :D

  16. slachtafval says:

    Sounds like a myth indeed. Especially since the House of Orange did not become royal until the early 19th century…

    • Antinous / Moderator says:

      Especially since the House of Orange did not become royal until the early 19th century…

      O RLY?

      • slachtafval says:

        Ok, granted… they had to move abroad in order to be able to sit on a real throne though ;)

        • Antinous / Moderator says:

          they had to move abroad in order to be able to sit on a real throne though

          And two of them had to squeeze onto it at the same time.

  17. Geoff says:

    I love eating carrots. I’ve eaten a bag or two in one sitting which gives my skin a temporary, orange-ish tone. Just imagine the possibilities with all these colours!

  18. Anonymous says:

    while the change from purplish to bright orange did occur in the Netherlands in the 1600s, the “William of Orange” tale is a myth

    Lots of still-life paintings from around 1600 and before showing orange carrots.

  19. Stefan Jones says:

    Do the different colors have different flavors?

    After discovering the amazingness of weirdly colored, lumpy heirloom tomatoes, I’d like to give these variant carrots a try.

    • jere7my says:

      Stefan, Cook’s Illustrated had a comparison guide in the issue before the current one. Looks like it’s not online, but they did a good job explaining the different tastes, textures, and uses.

    • GlenBlank says:

      Not all other-than-orange carrots are “heirloom” varieties – many are recently-developed cultivars.

      And, yes, some of them taste somewhat different.

      Indeed, there are different cultivars of orange carrots that taste somewhat different as well – the “Nantes” type comes in some perfectly orange varieties that are more tender and sweet than the standard “Imperator”, for example.

      It’s impossible to generalize by color, since, just like the orange ones, some cultivars come in several colors, and any particular color may be one of several different cultivars.

      Seed catalogs can be the source of a wide variety if you want to grow your own (see this one, for example), and your local farmer’s market may have a number of varieties to sample and choose from.

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