Colton Harris-Moore, "Barefoot Bandit," arrested in the Bahamas after 2 years on the lam

Discuss

86 Responses to “Colton Harris-Moore, "Barefoot Bandit," arrested in the Bahamas after 2 years on the lam”

  1. dw_funk says:

    Man, the law-and-order types are in full swing here, huh? We all, every single one of us commenting, participate in a culture that has long idealized romantic criminals, especially during times of financial strife. This doesn’t excuse his crimes by any means; even Dillinger got shot, and I imagine he had much more public support. But it’s hard to say he’s not a product of the world he lives in.

    Also, I’m much more doubtful this kid has a nice and easy DSM-IV classification. Sure, he might be a sociopath, but why then would he have a facebook or playfully draw chalk footprints? Narcissist might be closer, but then why would he put his precious self in so much danger? If anything, he’ll have one of those nebulous personality disorders, which aren’t as sexy, and far more complicated.

  2. John Greg says:

    Antinous / Moderator said:

    “… charming rogue overlords.”

    Since when are predators, preying on the innocent and defenceless, charming?

    dw_funk said:

    “We all, every single one of us commenting, participate in a culture that has long idealized romantic criminals, especially during times of financial strife.”

    That may be true, but you are nonetheless widley missing the point. The types of criminals that are historically romanticized are always the steal from the rich (and sometimes give to the poor) types. Not self-centered pricks like this guy who prey on relatively powerless individuals.

    dw_funk said also:

    “… the law-and-order types are in full swing here.”

    I don’t think it is so much law and order types as it is people who do not condone predatory behaviour, selfish greed, asnd wanton destruction of private property in the name of fun, ego, and self-aggrandizment. A very different kettle of fish.

    • teapot says:

      Antinous / Moderator said:
      “… charming rogue overlords.”
      Since when are predators, preying on the innocent and defenceless, charming?

      I love the furious and empassioned comment bro, but read a few more BB comments sections and you will soon realise that Anti chimes in whenever someone’s big head needs deflating, or when it’s an ideal time for some misleadingly dry sarcasm. This is a case of the latter.

  3. osmo says:

    I have to agree with the first poster. Its easy getting away with shit like this if your upper class.

  4. bardfinn says:

    I would have idolised him when I was /six/, and doing everything possible to stay on the playground when recess was over, including dodging — for almost an hour — the three (seven-year-old) girls that were sent out to collect me.

    But I hit puberty, and learned that it’s not necessary for others to suffer for me to live and enjoy.

  5. maturin says:

    A sociopath is not free.

  6. jphilby says:

    Rock ‘n’ roll will never die.

  7. ackpht says:

    No normal human is a mere “product” of the world- we all have brains, we can all choose.

    Either this person chooses badly or he is incapable of choosing. Either way it gets him time in a small room.

  8. kingfelix says:

    “That may be true, but you are nonetheless widley missing the point. The types of criminals that are historically romanticized are always the steal from the rich (and sometimes give to the poor) types. Not self-centered pricks like this guy who prey on relatively powerless individuals.”

    Isn’t that exactly that which is the romanticizing part, turning someone into an idolized image who only stole from the rich for purely altruistic motives. So I do think it is you that miss an important point in how myths and legends works.

    • John Greg says:

      “Isn’t that exactly that which is the romanticizing part, turning someone into an idolized image who only stole from the rich for purely altruistic motives.”

      Yes, quite. And no, I am not missing the point. That more or less is my point, by which I mean that I do not think this asshat warrants the romanticizing he’s been receiving. Do you see what I mean?

      He is in no way a hero. And the folks who feel he is are deluded and clearly fail to comprehend with any kind of meaningful intelligence what a hero is — at least in theory anyway.

      Romanticizing this goof, and calling him a “people’s hero” as some folks do, is rather like calling a rap/pimp bling-bling bedecked multimillionaire who makes money off seducing the poor to part with their life savings by indulging in a life of Big Macs, cheap wine, and crack, a hero of the common man. It’s nonsense.

      • dw_funk says:

        I apologize for so clearly missing the point. I was not trying to imply that I “condone predatory behaviour, selfish greed, asnd wanton destruction of private property in the name of fun, ego, and self-aggrandizment.” My “law-and-order” comments were about the nasty vibe in this thread. Mr. Harris-Moore didn’t kill anyone, or rape anyone. I was just surprised and a little dismayed that this thread had turned into a two-minute hate. He wasn’t a good guy, but he just got caught, and now he’ll be paying for his actions; let’s hope that when he comes out of prison, he’ll have directed his obvious talents in another direction. I think all the bile directed his way in this thread is more than a little over-the-top.

        I think you missed my point about romanticizing. He is obviously not a hero, and I would disagree with anyone who said as much. A hero needs to be someone who uses his or her powers for good, not mischief. His romanticized status comes from the sheer improbability of his escape and flight from justice. He got from one end of the country to another on his wits alone, and I think that it’s totally appropriate to admire his derring-do while disagreeing with his methods.

        He’s not a hero, but he is a romantic and romanticized criminal; he had that certain style and verve that makes for a good story. He’s a lot like Frank Abagnale, who was also a Very Bad Thief who stole a lot of money from a lot of people; while his actions were morally wrong, the way he carried them out was exciting, and everybody loves a good story, especially if it’s Based on a True Story.

        • gwailo_joe says:

          This misguided kid lived ‘outside the law’ for Two Years!!!

          That is not easy to do!

          And many peoples love an “Outlaw”: non-murderous pirates, Jesse James (the real one), Robin Hood, Lupin III, Dillinger etc etc

          And back to the first comment: Geronimo? Spartacus? Shaka Zulu?

          Are not those ‘ethnic’ outlaws known and respected (in some form) to this very day?

          (Granted, this thief-child should not be spoken of in the same breath as such warriors and brave men)

          Yet, The People love anyone who can successfully thumb their nose at authority.

        • John Greg says:

          “My ‘law-and-order’ comments were about the nasty vibe in this thread. Mr. Harris-Moore didn’t kill anyone, or rape anyone. I was just surprised and a little dismayed that this thread had turned into a two-minute hate.”

          Well, I must say that’s a good point. Thanks for expanding on that. I agree with you actually, especially now I understand what your point was/is.

          “I think all the bile directed his way in this thread is more than a little over-the-top.”

          You know, you’re quite right. And I must admit to some hindsight surprise at my own reaction to him. I am not as a rule a vindictive law and order kind of guy. Heck, I even indulge in certain forms of civil disobediance myself, from time to time. You know what I think it might in part be? It’s the smugness of his facial appearance combined with the almost hero-worship he has received from some quarters. That combinations make me froth for some mysterious reason. I should get over it, I think.

          “He got from one end of the country to another on his wits alone, and I think that it’s totally appropriate to admire his derring-do while disagreeing with his methods.”

          Yet again, point taken. And again, thanks for expanding on your points and giving me food for thought.

          I always appreciates me a little food for thought … nom, nom, nom.

          • querent says:

            Wow. That kind of reasoned consideration is a precious rarity. Totally outside of the content of the discussion, that type of comment doesn’t come up much.

            Power to the limber!

          • dw_funk says:

            Thanks for being so polite. I can see why a person would find him detestable, I guess; I would probably be wearing an equally smug look on my face if I had been avoiding the FBI for two years.

            That Outside article is really interesting, if a little hagiographic.

  9. Anonymous says:

    That was a fun thread to read. I like the kid just because I’ve felt that way before — when you’re only 21 and working a full time job, you start to wonder if your intelligence could really let you live outside of society. I’d never have the balls to steal (much less fly and crash) a plane, but I get where this kid is coming from.

    That doesn’t rectify his crimes, though, and he will be punished for it in America’s “Justice System.” But I still think a little appreciation for the little klepto is in order.

    And if you’re really outraged that this kid has Facebook fans, you need to start spending more time on the internet. I found a facebook group called “I’m Hitler…nom nom nom the Jews!”. It had a bunch of fans, too. What’s that tell you, internet?

  10. naughtypundit says:

    I wonder if he has Aspergers. He comes across as highly intelligent but slightly unbalanced.

    • WizarDru says:

      No,he doesn’t have Aspergers. He doesn’t display, that I’ve heard of, any of the signs of even a light case. My son has Asperger’s Syndrome and it’s pretty noticeable to even casual viewers after a short time. I’m not seeing an intense dedication to something nor difficulty with social cues…quite the opposite, in fact. The Barefoot Bandit is just a mal-adjusted kid.

      I’m not really sure why so many BB-ers suggest I’m supposed to sympathize with him, though. He’s done hundreds of thousands of dollars in property damage, undermined the security and safety of multiple communities and only through sheer luck has he not managed to kill anyone with his various thefts and subsequent crashes.

      His victims have not been exclusively the rich, nor have they been even privileged individuals. Stealing the boat of a fisherman is hardly ‘sticking it to the man’, though it’s hardly an excuse if someone steals your expensive hobby, either. I’m certainly not seeing any indication that the bandit actually took his victim’s circumstances into consideration when robbing them. He was just acting in his own selfish interests. He’s just a common grifter who managed to not do enough damage to anger people. If he had accidentally hit someone in a stolen car or crashed his plane onto someone (or had damaged a structure, etc.), I think we’d be having a different conversation.

  11. Anonymous says:

    Yah, we should ignore his crime because there are bigger ones out there. Tell that to the people who were victims.

    If I busted my ass to earn and maintain something like a boat and worked hard to take care of it I wouldn’t call it a trivial offense.

  12. mzed says:

    There are other famous, teenage criminals who are more upper class and less white than this guy. David Hampton, for example: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Hampton

    And Will Smith played him in the movie version.

  13. querent says:

    For the difference between an “outlaw” act and a “political” act, I refer you to “Still Life with Woodpecker” by Tom Robbins.

    And for those who think this story is only taken as cool cause it’s a white male…what the ever living fuck? I personally give a rats ass about the kid’s demographics. Such things do not touch the free.

    I dig it. Not calling it right or wrong and not arguing with those obsessed with the sanctity of property. I just think it’s a cool tale, and likely fun as fuck. Good luck, kid.

  14. Enormo says:

    So many interesting narritives being spun in these comments. Like…

    I have to agree with the first poster. Its easy getting away with shit like this if your upper class.

    How is this kid upper class? How is this kid getting away with anything? Seems to me he had a fucked up childhood and will spend the next 20 years behind bars.

    Oh… who cares. KILL THE RICH! You’re right! That feels great!!!

  15. mdh says:

    Why does our culture celebrate sociopaths?

    What do we know about him? 19, white, educated.

    How would this be treated if he weren’t white? If he were a woman? or a middle-aged man? or a Jewish homosexual? a Cypriot amputee? etc..

    One of the most privileged people on the planet goes on a crime spree and we all cheer? Any one else did that and we’d reach for our revolvers. Why?

    • Anonymous says:

      From the wiki article linked in the original post: Neighbors said they made several calls to Child Protective Services, believing Colton was neglected or abused. Colton’s abusive father walked out when he was about two years old, after attempting to choke him during an argument at a family barbecue. According to his mother, Pam Kohler, his stepfather died when he was about seven years old, and from the time Colton was in the first grade, she knew there was “something off about him” – “sort of a disconnection”.

      This is your idea of “one of the most privileged people on the planet”? Being white certainly can have it’s advantages, but it’s naive to assume that every caucasian you see has led a charmed life.

      The reason people have turned this kid into a folk hero is because he has managed, for quite some time, to use little more than his wits to take the things he wants (or feels he deserves) from people who tend to have amenities in surplus. Sure, nobody wants to be robbed; but it’s tough to get too angry at a kid who steals from people with vacation homes and their own airplanes.

      • TimDrew says:

        “Sure, nobody wants to be robbed; but it’s tough to get too angry at a kid who steals from people with vacation homes and their own airplanes.”

        Wow.

        I’m a (not rich) pilot, and I know quite a few folks who are not exactly independantly wealthy who do indeed own planes (often several decades old, saved and scrimped for, and bought to build time on. Aspiring commercial pilots often do this, or get into time share). Aviation is expensive and very difficult to get into if you’re not rich or going the military route.

        I’m with mdh on this one.

    • teapot says:

      Apart from the revolver part, +1

      I’m always amazed at what amuses small minds.

    • theawesomerobot says:

      I think it’s because many people want to be him in one way or another. Doing what he wants, when he wants without regard to the law and all – it’s the same reason people find pirates appealing.

      • peterbruells says:

        I honestly can’t remember any pirate movie were the protagonist acted against harmless civilian – it’s usually against against foreign enemies (rightful war) or bad local government (rightful rebellion) or evil pirates.

    • xander says:

      If he had been anything other than a tall, photogenic Caucasian male… He would be branded a ‘criminal’ and not have these people supporting him as if he were some victim.

      You had your fun kid, now it’s time to deal with the consequences.

      The entertainment/media aspects of this story (in addition to the small-minded Facebook comments) really makes me lose faith in our society.

    • sgnp says:

      I know I may not speak for everyone here, but I’d be very interested in a story about a Cypriot amputee who steals airplanes.

    • adam hellbound says:

      C’mon. Stow your pseudo-outrage, please. It would be pretty cool in my book if ANYONE did it, and asking why “society” is or is not or does or does not “x” is a pretty simplistic, wrongheaded and nonsensical question.

      • teapot says:

        asking why “society” is or is not or does or does not “x” is a pretty simplistic, wrongheaded and nonsensical question.

        Um, Why? Just because a question is complex does not mean it’s unworthy of consideration.

        Simplistic? Maybe, but things sometimes need to be simplified to be analysed.

        Wrongheaded?… Are you on thesaurus.com?? If anything is wrongheaded it’s your suggestion that we should just appreciate this fool’s shenanigans.

        Nonsensical? Made sense to me… Dickwad gets busted for his dickwad actions… net-scum come out to defend him… mdh laments humanity’s seeming celebration of idiocy. Where, exactly, do you stop following the plot?

        • adam hellbound says:

          1) so it’s both complex and simplistic?

          2) societies don’t behave.

          • teapot says:

            I’ve never been so confused, as how best to respond, than right now.

            1) so it’s both complex and simplistic?
            1) Yes… I hate to make your lil brain work so hard, but things can share opposing characteristics.

            I was saying the issue of society’s general behaviour is a complex one, and that to process complex questions you sometimes need to simplify things. If you can’t follow this, I think you’re reading the wrong site. There are blogs out there for kids, you know?

            2) societies don’t behave.
            2) While, in some ways, I agree – I dont see how this relates to anything I or anyone else in this comments sections raised.

            *Yawn*

        • John Greg says:

          “Dickwad gets busted for his dickwad actions… net-scum come out to defend him… mdh laments humanity’s seeming celebration of idiocy. Where, exactly, do you stop following the plot?”

          LOL. Succinctly put.

          I suspect it’s a sad truth that everybody is somebody’s net-scum.

  16. igzabier says:

    no more can we enjoy the illusion of freedom which we vicariously participated in with Colton’s adventures, ‘just-us’ shall prevail. imagine if we all behaved ethically but against the state status quo-gasp. “Follow your inner moonlight; don’t hide the madness.” -Ginsberg

    • k0an says:

      How is it ethical to damage and steal other people’s property? Do you seriously wish this is how everyone in the world behaved? The reductio ad absurdum counter argument to your argument is a pretty trivial task.

      The reason people are drawn to this story is because it’s fun to briefly imagine being in the adventure that he’s in and solving all the challenges that he is faced with. I say “briefly” because in reality constantly trying to find food and shelter while running away from the law would be a miserable existence.

      However, if you still think this should be the standard behavior in society then please post your home address so that everyone has a chance to steal the computer you wrote your comment with.

      • defunctdoormat says:

        “However, if you still think this should be the standard behavior in society then please post your home address so that everyone has a chance to steal the computer you wrote your comment with.”

        You don’t see the serious flaw with this idea? That the computer being written on is ALREADY stolen, and that the place the letter being typed is ‘borrowed’? Sure, that would be quite funny, then!

        “I honestly can’t remember any pirate movie were the protagonist acted against harmless civilian”

        Um, that’s cuz they’re hollywood movies? You really think Hollywood has ever shown pirates as they really are?

        This is actually why people like this guy! Because Hollywood has set up this type of person to be an anti-hero, one to be followed and praised!

        Should everyone act like this? If everyone did, no one would care! Of course, it’s impossible for everyone to act like this. There have to be producers and earners to steal from!

        • peterbruells says:

          Of course I’m referring to Hollywood movies. That’s what people pay money to see, that’s what children emulate in their games.

          I’d even go so far as to claim that the “historical pirate” and “entertainment pirate” and “current pirate” are three distinct concepts for most people, nearly unrelated.

  17. Anonymous says:

    The Bahamas are, technically, not in the Caribbean Sea. But I digress.

  18. gwailo_joe says:

    Well, no doubt it’s easier for a white guy to get away with such malfeasance: generally the clean cut white kid is off the radar.

    And yes, what he did was wrong. . . unacceptable behavior in any society. And he should pay for the damages he caused (especially from his book deal, movie rights etc)

    But the reason why people will buy the book and/or see the movie is because he managed to elude authorities for so long: Fight the Power! Stick it to The Man! These are common themes that many people can relate to.

    Who has not thought, even for a second, what it would feel like to run away, live in the forest, fly a plane, escape from. . .everything.

    • John Greg says:

      Well, okay. “Fight the Power! Stick it to The Man!” are fine and laudable acts of anti-capitalistic misbehaviour, but the problem with this asshat is that his targets were not “the power” nor “the man”. His targets were you and me.

      So, fuck him. String him up. He’s a predator, a sociopath, and a self-centered moronic leach. The morons who praise him should be the recipients of his anti-social behaviour so that they get a sense of what it really is that they’re praising, because it is most certainly not what they think they’re praising.

      Stick it to the power, not the people.

      • Anonymous says:

        Speak for yourself. I don’t own a plane or a boat. He’s a modern day Robin Hood. “You and me” just have too many expensive toys. Besides isn’t that what insurance is for?

  19. Anonymous says:

    YEEEHAW – I live on Orcas Island, the island he spent most of his time. He broke into dozens of homes and businesses, stole millions (including the airplanes), and really threw off our community. We are a tight community. People here are kind and trustworthy, the kind that leave their keys in the ignition. I know that sounds stupid to some, but when you live without fear, life is just amazing.

    Since his spree, people started locking their cars, using security lights, buying security systems. Worst of all is the fear or uneasiness that came with it.

    No sane or rational human should support him, except his mother since mothers always should give unconditional love and support.

    It would be nice if his restitution was paid for by the book and movie deals.

    • Anonymous says:

      HAHAHA! That’s so funny! You guys let one teenage ruin your lives & be afraid? What weenies! I’d hate to see how you guys handle real crime!

    • Pipenta says:

      Anon,

      You paint a picture of a tight-knit society, something wonderful that was ruined by this guy.

      Only, tight knit and trusting as it was, there really wasn’t anything in place to help this guy when he was a child and being abused. I daresay, even now, there are children experiencing terror and pain, as there are everywhere. Nobody steps in to help. Nothing special to your island.

      So the kid is gone, but people are still locking their doors. Clearly, he is no longer a threat, but the island is no longer the Eden you remember. But, really, it never was one. Two-year old children were getting strangled and going hungry. So if I weigh the relative injustices, a child being abused versus having to lock your doors, it is easy to see the worse injustice. And even if I throw the thefts onto the scale, the balance doesn’t tip the other way.

      Please don’t think I’m singling out your island. This is the way of the world. We fail at this, collectively. If a guy steals stereos or sports cars, crowds flock to brand him a sociopath. “String him up” is the sentiment. How dare he take our STUFF? But when no one helps a child who is abused, you basically take their life. You give them a burden of pain and insist that they must carry it. We just aren’t in any kind of rush to label parents as sociopaths. Steal an expensive item and we will rage at you. Terrorize a third grader? Shame a ten year old? Well, we can’t really DO anything about it. We can’t really step in. There are parental rights to be considered, right? And kids are property, like airplanes and electronics, aren’t they? I mean, that is our culture’s primary priority, our stuff.

      And even if you can ID an abuse situation, even if the teachers or neighbors had cared enough to do something, there really isn’t much in place to help these kids. And yep, some of them will turn out to be personality disordered. And some of them will grow up to commit crimes, like stealing Cessna airplanes, while some, the ones who perhaps you prefer because they don’t interfere with your life to the extent that you have to lock your door, quietly incest their daughters or beat their wives or bully their employees.

      There are different thoughts about the roots of personality disorders: nature or nurture or a combination of the two. But not much is done about them. Research gets a pittance. There is no public education about the issue, which is odd, because the presence of disordered people is expensive indeed. We, as a society, leave these matters to religion. Religions couch the matter in terms of good and evil and really, given thousands of years, haven’t done shit to improve matters. This good and evil riff is their bread and butter. Besides, there are too many sociopaths running religions. The hell they want to be studied, identified and have their activities curtailed. And that leaves us all with pain and anger.

      If it had been my pretty little airplane that had gotten jacked, I’d be pissed too. But it isn’t, so I can step back. From a distance, I too feel anger and pain and frustration, like many posters here. But I identify more with the kid than the property owners. And that is probably where a lot of his fb fans are coming from, that empathy.

      We want a happy ending, please. And to us, it’s not about stringing this guy up and seeing him to time in the slam. Likely he’ll be jailed. He’s smart, he’s creative and, I can assure you, he is in pain. Not saying it justified the thefts. But he sure was coping as best he could. I’m not sure that all the enraged posters here would have been better under the circumstances. Not killing or raping anyone is hardly reason enough to praise someone. Stealing stuff is NOT good. He did go outside of society’s expectation. He violated the social contract. But the society he grew up in was not so good for him. A small, friendly, tight-knit community and nobody helped him? Yep, probably pissed as hell. And he found rather a creative way to deal with it. Can you imagine what he would have been if he hadn’t been raised by such horrible people? Do you even have the vaguest idea of what an asset he’d have been to your island had he been allowed to grow into his real potential instead of being beaten and starved, marginalized and neglected? Aren’t you pissed about that? Isn’t that a greater loss than a laptop or a volkswagon?

      It would be nice if he could get some support and help during that time. But that, for the most part, is not what prison does.

      It would be nice if any funds from books or movies funded things like the salaries of therapists for prisoners and support systems for abused children.

      I don’t really care that you can’t leave your door unlocked anymore. Most of us live in places where we have to lock our doors. It’s really not a big deal. It doesn’t make me rage or weep. Child abuse does. Child abuse makes me rail and fret and knots my stomach.

      String ‘em up? Such rage. Why isn’t it directed at the abusers and, perhaps, all the very many people who look the other way when abuse is happening. But then, there are so, so many who do just that and they are just on your little island paradise. They are everywhere and they get a total pass.

  20. Jeffrey Meyer says:

    http://outside.away.com/outside/culture/201001/colton-harris-moore-plane-steal-1.html

    And the next fool who says being white equals a free pass in life gets the “privelege” of my foot up their ass.

  21. HOTDAMN says:

    Our culture celebrates sociopaths because we are envious of their freedom.

  22. Anonymous says:

    …and his mother (probably communicating with him throughout his crime spree) has been writing a book about him with expectations to sell it for beau-coup bucks. (probably also has a movie script going too)

    make no mistake, we who live on the San-Juans, know that this kid and his family are a real bunch of “charmers”

  23. David Carroll says:

    I hear that Hanks and Spielberg are already attached to Catch Me If You Can 2. Justin Bieber will star as the sociopathic little snot.

  24. Anonymous says:

    fight the power? stick it to the man?

    he IS the power. he IS the man.

    aside from his age, he sits neatly on top of every kyriarchical power scheme i can think of.

    send him to jail, don’t watch his movie, and don’t read his book. he’s got nothing to say that’s worth hearing.

  25. Rob Knop says:

    Ugh. The top Facebook comment is very sad. If you’re going to contribute to a defence fund, contribute to one of those being attacked by the RIAA machine rather than this guy. Or to somebody like Peter Watts (the guy who got roughed over by US border guards and then arrested for it). Or to innocent folks we’ve held at Guantanamo for a decade. (Except, wait, we’re not letting them have a defence. Never mind.)

    That the guy thinks there’s something ethically wrong with people trying to make a buck off of Colton’s popularity without *helping* Colton indicates a deep hypocrisy. Colton’s a bottom feeder. Those who make a buck off of his popularity may be bottom feeders, they may be creative, but in any event they’re not robbing and vandalizing people.

  26. jimbuck says:

    Christ, what an asshole.

  27. phisrow says:

    I would love to see a psych writeup on this kid. Narcissist? Sociopath? Destructive odd duck not otherwise classified?

  28. optuser says:

    Enjoy prison, “Sweetmouth Bieber.”

    His mother is reportedly happy her son taught himself to fly. I wonder if the mothers of the 9/11 hijackers feel the same way. I’m just glad nobody was injured by this moron.

    • James says:

      Jesus christ, what on earth has this got to do with 9/11? Why are people so incapable of making balanced statements.

    • querent says:

      “His mother is reportedly happy her son taught himself to fly. I wonder if the mothers of the 9/11 hijackers feel the same way.”

      A brand new analog of Godwin’s Law! Hereafter to be referred to as “Querent’s Law.” I decree it.

      • optuser says:

        I want 1/3 credit for the creation of this term. The other 1/3 goes to James #37 for calling me out for my unbalanced post. Please record this in the official log of the internets.

        And to affirm James’ statement, it has nothing to do with actions of 9/11 but the mindset of a parent who would rejoice in their child’s achievement through criminal acts. Granted, I’d rather have 10 Coltons out breaking stuff than one person getting knifed for their iPhone. It’s the part about people thinking this is cool that’s more worthy of scorn than the actual criminal acts.

        My main point is that I think Colton’s mom is a piece of “work” that needs a slap with a big fish. 15 pounds of northern pike would do the trick. It would need to be one of those magic fish that helps people see the error of their ways.

  29. Anonymous says:

    Trade him for MORE spies!

  30. bklynchris says:

    This kid is lucky to be talking at all if he went on a crime spree in the Bahamas. Eleuthera? A local’s bar? Man, they don’t call them the out islands for nothin’.

    Now if he was absconding with booty from some of the yachts I’ve seen down there…way freaking power to him, and he be postin’ to facebook from Monte Carlo. But a Bahamian’s business, not cool mon.

  31. GyroMagician says:

    Do people really say “burglarized”? Really?

  32. Anonymous says:

    Yeah, in a perfect world the bozos who think this guy is in anyway worthy of praise would have their houses broken into and their possessions stolen.

    • Anonymous says:

      Yeah except the people giving him praise probably realize there’s more to life them possessions. Also, I have home owners insurance so it would mean I get all new stuff!

  33. John Napsterista says:

    All these comments saying to string him up, and not a word of accolade or even detached astonishment that this H.S. dropout from near the bottom of the American social ladder learned to fly aeroplanes by playing video games, walked away from crash landing a few of them, and then hotwired a Cessna and flew from Indiana to the Bahamas before he was old enough to drink? You don’t have to be a Nazi to appreciate the craftsmanship in a Luger; similarly, you can recognize that stealing is bad and still acknowledge that this is straight up rock and roll.

  34. FreakCitySF says:

    That’s too bad :( I was hoping he’d never be found. It’s more legend material.

  35. Pipenta says:

    @ bklynchris, You are, perhaps, confusing Lutra with Jamaica? Eleuthera’s a very mellow place and the residents are not violent. By and large they are happy with their lives and they are proud to be Bahamians and, no, they really wouldn’t like to switch places with you at all, thank you very much. It’s a mellow scene. That could change if those frickin’ tarballs and oil slicks start washing up on their beaches. But they wouldn’t get all worked up about this kid. No way,

  36. Anonymous says:

    Colton Harris-Moore should be a star, not a criminal! He is almost a minor. Just give the kid another chance with community service and rehab for cleptomaniacs, etc.. See what he gets out of that.. Find out what is family background was? What causes it, and don’t think i am a liberal. I am a conservative. But get down to the real cause of his incredible crimes, then decide what is right for him…
    Dirk-David Todd

  37. ackpht says:

    I figure the Cessna this guy stole, flew to the Bahamas, and ditched in the ocean was worth in the vicinity of $450,000. There must be a long line of insurance companies waiting to sue him.

  38. Anonymous says:

    Something I’d love to know is how many of the FB fans actually um… own stuff?

    I wonder if the fact that this is going on in the Bahamas makes it easier… I have a feeling they wouldn’t be so enthusiastic if it weren’t their neighborhoods.

    • igpajo says:

      Anon said “I wonder if the fact that this is going on in the Bahamas makes it easier… I have a feeling they wouldn’t be so enthusiastic if it weren’t their neighborhoods.”

      This wasn’t going on in just in the Bahamas. He’s only been down there for a week or two. It ended there. He’s been on the run in and around Camano Island, Washington for the past 2 years. So there were a lot of people in the rural Pacific NW who were wondering where this guy was and are pretty relieved he’s been caught. He stole at least 3 or 4 planes up here, several boats, and who knows how many cars, not to mention breaking into homes.

      What I find amazing that noone’s mentioned except one radio DJ here in Seattle, is how in the hell did this guy steal an airplane in Indiana and fly it unnoticed or unchallenged to the Bahamas! Can you fly a plane that far without refuelling? Where did he refuel? Why is noone asking that question?

      • bardfinn says:

        If you fly through uncontrolled airspace, have cash or a stolen credit card, and a map from the Internet showing non-tower strips with fueling facilities, then yes, it is entirely possible. The islands are what, 150 miles from Miami – ?

        • igpajo says:

          Interesting. I had no idea there were un-towered airstrips with un-manned fueling facilities out there. I can definitely see how it would be possible then. Thanks for clearing that up.

    • Anonymous says:

      At least a smartphone or a computer I’m guessing.

  39. Anonymous says:

    It would be swell if all the people who knowingly helped him – aided and abeted a felon – did some jail time. But then, his victims don’t much care, so why should we?

  40. Glenn Fleishman says:

    The Seattle Times ran a story on Saturday about his mother’s plan to cash in, and noted that she would seem to be able to do so and keep the money, regardless of whether judgments were ever entered against her son.

    The Times then ran a front-cover correction today: Washington State (along with several others plus a federal law that could be invoked in certain cases) has a Son of Sam law that prevents both participants and those associated (even if not charged or involved) with someone convicted of crimes.

    I don’t know if the mother will be charged with aiding and abetting. She claimed to never know where he was, although he was calling her all the time.

  41. friendpuppy says:

    My predictions: He’ll do about a year in prison. This depends upon whether he escapes his captors in the time between then and now. And let’s face it–he’s smarter than most of them and some of us.

    Also: if you think the guy is upper class, take a look at where his mom lives.

  42. Antinous / Moderator says:

    I, for one, welcome our new 6′-5″, handsome, one-third-my-age, charming rogue overlords. Maybe he could guest blog.

  43. Anonymous says:

    Sad to see we’ve been so trained to lose all sense of our imagination and to lead our lives the “acceptable” way that we can’t admit there is an intriguing story here.

    Aren’t we missing the point that as some posters have stated Colton has not physically harmed anyone….no violence here…we are talking about MATERIAL THINGS that most of you place so much importance on that you are talking like your lives would be over if it happened to you…

    Guess what…If it happened to me it would suck and be a nuisance…but my insurance would take care of it and life would go on….

  44. bklynchris says:

    @Pipenta-Oh I am sorry that you interpreted from my statement as suggesting that Eleutherans were violent. Not my intention. Peace OUT.

  45. Glindie says:

    It took them *2* years to catch the kid? 2 *years*?!?

    LOL.

    No wonder people idolize him. Either the “police” (and I put that in quotes to indicate the global police force) are idiots, or this kid is brilliant.

    Props, “Barefoot Bandit”–I couldn’t manage to keep my *** out of jail for 2 years…

Leave a Reply