Remix of scenes in Mad Men of people smoking cigarettes

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19 Responses to “Remix of scenes in Mad Men of people smoking cigarettes”

  1. MollyMaguire says:

    Cool suits or not, smoking just plain creeps me out. I would never have been able to edit that clip together.

  2. Anonymous says:

    For the record Peggy is smoking weed towards end, see guy behind her on couch who is wasted.

  3. Joe says:

    Or, the video will have no effect on whether the viewer feels like smoking, or does not. In that case, advertising doesn’t work.

  4. Nylund says:

    After a serious medical condition it became extremely necessary for me to quit smoking immediately. My girlfriend, in an act of solidarity, decided to quit as well.

    Mad Men made that VERY difficult. For those of us very tempted to light up, it makes the urge near unbearable.

  5. defunctdoormat says:

    Reminds me of my father who smoked WAY too much throughout my entire childhood. One of the effects I remember from the smoking is the yellow gunk that it left on the lights and ceiling in his bathroom. He used to start the day with a cig, and the entire thing was coated. It was pretty freaking disgusting.

    Oh, well. People do what they need to get through life. I won’t condemn anyone for doing it, but to this day, I can’t stand being around anyone who smokes.

  6. Donald Petersen says:

    Now that was a hoot.

  7. Anonymous says:

    “I just love the aesthetics of this show. ”

    Is that because the plot is just an amalgam of “General Hospital” episodes gilded with stereotypical 1960′s nostalgia?

    It’s architectural/costume porn.

  8. Anonymous says:

    Mad Men does a great job in creating an atmosphere.

    Problem is, the early 1960s was a period of horrendously bad aesthetics. Take a look at nearly any building from that period, the worst architecture ever.

    Take a look at the real fashions from early 1960s – they were pretty bad, except for the thin ties on men, which are back in.

    The early 1960s was truly a lame period – Rachael Carson wrote the most important work of that or possibly any other period – “Silent Spring” which awoke America to the environmental destruction that was taking place on a huge scale.

    Mediocrity is a term that was basically invented at that time and it describes it best.

    Mad Men doesn’t go into any of this, the show doesn’t go into the huge cultural effects – mostly negative – mass advertising created, or at least how mass advertising has changes the United States.

    Instead, Mad Men is basically a prime time soap opera that is beautifully produced.

    I think it is a grossly over over-hyped show that could have been great, but is as mediocre as the era it portrays.

  9. Anonymous says:

    My goodness, the Internet is in LOVE LOVE LOVE with this show. Suddenly it is popping up on all the Internet sites and blogs I frequent. And I only heard of it last week. I’ll have too look it up and see what channel it’s on.

  10. ill lich says:

    There are only two reasons to smoke:

    1. you are an insecure teen trying to look older/cooler, or

    2. you are an addict.

    Neither reason is particularly compelling, and the first often leads to the second. People who claim they smoke for “the flavor” are full of crap (if the flavor were so tasty they’d make tobacco flavored ice cream or soda or muffins.) I admit: if you are an addict, there is indeed a certain rush involved with satisfying that need, and the “flavor” associated with that rush would be wonderfully familiar, but is that really worth it?

    These rules apply to cigar smokers too. I’ve tried smoking, including cigars (even good Cuban cigars just stink), and there’s nothing there except a crutch for small egos.

    Addiction is an “acquired taste.”

    • nutbastard says:

      Insecure teen is redundant.

      “if you are an addict, there is indeed a certain rush involved with satisfying that need”

      No, you’re an addict when there is no rush anymore, only a deficit of well being in the absence of the substance. It’s an annoyance, a chore, an inconvenient pain in the ass.

      I’m in the middle of quitting, in fits and starts and stops. I’m doing a sort of self-study in my own addiction. It’s powerful, this. Made it 44 hours without any tobacco a week ago before I lost my resolve. But it’s ok, it’d been nigh on 10 years since i’d even gone 24 hours, so it’s still a victory, one that lets me know that i CAN do it. The real trick is not having the first one of the day, because it sets precedent and pace for the rest of the day.

      It also doesn’t help to drink, since that actually does making smoking more pleasurable while inhibiting ones sense of discipline.

      Nothing worth doing is ever easy, though.

    • GrvyRdRiTo says:

      The first led to the second for me… got me laid a couple times I should mention so it did its jon for the first. But now I’ve been smoke free for three months. Clean as a whistle. And yet,still can’t run a mile without stopping…

      Although,I did notice that conversations are different when tobacco smoke is involved. They last longer.
      Once I smoked two packs of Parliament Fulls with some bums in Santa Cruz while playing billiards. Interesting conversations. But I’m not sure yet if throat cancer is worth it.

      Last night watching Mad Men got me craiivving bad.

    • Anonymous says:

      3. You started out smoking joints and generated a tobacco habit.

  11. Anonymous says:

    I remember being four years old, in an elevator with my parents, when a man stepped in, smoking. I remember thinking “what a stupid idiot.” Zen mind, beginner’s mind.

  12. Anonymous says:

    That was a hoot and a half.

    I smoked for a few months in high school before I’d had enough and decided to quit. The process of quitting smoking took about 12 years. And it wasn’t until the indoor smoking bans took effect that I could really go the pub and enjoy a beer without having to white-knuckle my way through it. Now it’s been years since I’ve even thought about having a smoke.

  13. Shelby Davis says:

    I don’t watch the show, never smoked a single cigarette, and get all hacky just standing around people who are smoking, even outdoors–but now I want to smoke so bad.

    Darn you, advertising!

  14. orwellian says:

    I discovered the series this weekend and watched every damn episode. At first, the way they smoke on that show is amazing. The sound engineers are geniuses in how they capture every sound from the lighter (yes, I’ve been playing with my lighter all through the weekend, too) and they know how to shoot smoke well. A big part of the first season was working with Lucky Strike cigarettes to find a way to advertise past the whole ‘smoking kills you and we really proved it with science’ thing. watching a pregnant woman smoke, however, makes you hate cigarettes.

    While the architecture from that era is craptacular (my college library was built in that era and I always thought of the style as Early Concrete Bureaucratism), the clothes have style and flair to them that is appealing. The show is currently in 1964, I think, so the damn hippies will start taking over soon.

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