Black and White and Read All Over

Discuss

10 Responses to “Black and White and Read All Over”

  1. bob d says:

    Well, if we’re going to change the definition of what “read” means to “designed something that’s part of your reading experience, I guess we could say that Tim Berners-Lee is the most read… or Gutenberg, for that matter.
    This does raise an interesting question of what the most-read font is, though. I suspect it isn’t for the Roman character set, however.

  2. Tim says:

    From the title I thought this meant that the guy had read more books than anyone else in the world.

    And now I want to know who holds that honor…

  3. Tdawwg says:

    If you’re taking “read” to mean that the “author” made a visual design that’s ubiquitous, then a logo designer like Saul Bass or Paul Rand would probably win out over a type designer. Or maybe a photographer or other visual artist? Can you be clearer on how you’re using “most-read”?

    • Glenn Fleishman says:

      Can you be clearer on how you’re using “most-read”?

      Not in the literal sense.

      (I studied with Paul Rand once. The man put ketchup on his spaghetti every night.)

  4. Susan Oliver says:

    Changing what your rhetorical question meant halfway through your answer to it is silly.
    and
    This is like the Trivial Pursuit question about who had played the most major league baseball games, the answer being some organist

    It’s a joke, people! Glenn gets to do that once in a while. Sheesh…

  5. Anonymous says:

    He once used the default Times New Roman… just to see what it was like.

    Publishers pay him enormous sums… for fonts he hasn’t invented yet.

    He is… the most-read man in the world.

  6. Tdawwg says:

    I trust that you weren’t studying the culinary arts!

    A fine article, BTW.

  7. jtegnell says:

    This is like the Trivial Pursuit question about who had played the most major league baseball games, the answer being some organist.

  8. Fang Xianfu says:

    What’s the most-read article in the world? No, it’s not Cablegate, and it’s not the obituary of Sleazy Christopherson: it’s restaurant menus!

    Changing what your rhetorical question meant halfway through your answer to it is silly. And also, “likely”? Isn’t that just journalese for “I don’t know if it’s a fact, but I want to write about it anyway”?

Leave a Reply