Revolution in Tunisia: photo gallery

tun002.jpg (REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra)

Rioters burn a policeman's hat during clashes with the police in downtown of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. Tunisian President Zine al-Abedine Ben Ali declared a state of emergency on Friday and warned that protesters would be shot in an increasingly frantic effort to quell the worst unrest in his two decades in power. Then, he fled the country.

More on the fast-moving changes in Tunisia today, and protests in which tens of thousands called for change, at this Boing Boing post. More photos follow, below. But this one, taken after Ben Ali flew out of the country, may really sum it up best.

tun003.jpg Rioters throw stones during clashes with riot police in Tunis January 14, 2011. (REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra)

tun004.jpg Rioters carry a woman crying during clashes with the police in downtown of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. (REUTERS/Zohra Bensemr)

tun005.jpg A Tunisian soldier and rioters look at a rioter who lost consciousness after tear gas was released during clashes with the police in downtown of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. (REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra)

tun001.jpg An unidentified fan in the audience holds a placard saying "Long live Tunisia, Long live Kasserine and Long live liberty" during the handball World Championship Group A match between France and Tunisia in Kristianstad January 14, 2011. Tunisian President Zine al-Abedine Ben Ali stepped aside on Friday after failing to quell the worst anti-government unrest in his two decades in power. (Reuters)

tun006.jpg A rioter throws a tear gas canister, from the riot police, towards the riot police during clashes in downtown of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. (REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra)

tun007.jpg Rioters carry rocks during clashes with riot police in downtown of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. (REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra)

tun008.jpg Rioters clash with riot police in downtown of the capital Tunis January 14, 2011. (REUTERS/Zohra Bensemra)