Colorado Springs school bans kid who takes THC lozenges for neuro condition from attending because of "internal possession"

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97 Responses to “Colorado Springs school bans kid who takes THC lozenges for neuro condition from attending because of "internal possession"”

  1. Anonymous says:

    Feed him beer.
    That’s legal.

    Joking aside this is BS.

  2. Anonymous says:

    When I attended Dartmouth (1994-1998) they tried that internal possession cowpoop theory with respect to students walking on the grounds while drunk. It was met with much skepticism, but AFAIK, it was still official policy when I graduated.

  3. VICTOR JIMENEZ says:

    They have my vote for the “Never Go Full Retard” Awards 2011!

  4. happytweak says:

    Laws are supposed to be “guidelines for better living”, not orders. I thought that tyranny was what led to the revolution? We’re meant to be helping each other live safer and better. Telling a kid he can’t take his medicine to prevent his seizures so he can attend school and actually graduate and have a proper life… sounds like the “American Dream” to me, but it’s probably just that blood I smoked earlier talking. omgimsohiguiz.

  5. Anonymous says:

    So, how about the endorphins which the body produces, which are functionally similar to opiates? Are they also “internal possesion”?

  6. Brainspore says:

    “Zero tolerance” policies have no place in any sane society. There is almost ALWAYS going to be some legitimate exception nobody thought of when they wrote the rules.

  7. adamrice says:

    This is Colorado Springs we’re talking about. This level of militant ignorance may be dismaying, but it’s hardly surprising.

  8. Benoisito says:

    Alright lets take the law to its proverbial letter and bar all children from receiving an education on the grounds of internal possession of dimethyltryptamine.

  9. mgfarrelly says:

    Geez Cory, haven’t you considered the possibility that this kid might start selling his blood as a cheap high for kids on graduation day? Vamp-dosing, the kids are calling it. It’s all over the twitter. Fox did a whole investigative report. It’s huge on the myspace. Oh you go and laugh, but when some kid ODs on his friend’s plasma you’ll be sorry!

    P.S.: Zero tolerance=intolerance

  10. Ito Kagehisa says:

    According to the teachers in my family, school principals have usually been people who were more interested in pay raises than teaching children; that’s generally why they stop teaching and become administrators.

    Sometimes this ended up as a good deal for everyone, since the best teachers would never consider stopping teaching, and there’s no reason an ambitious person can’t be a good administrator.

    Now, though, after a decade of Zero Tolerance, perhaps the job also selects for a certain callous brutality.

    • Antinous / Moderator says:

      According to the teachers in my family, school principals have usually been people who were more interested in pay raises than teaching children; that’s generally why they stop teaching and become administrators.

      The same thing happens in nursing. People who have absolutely no aptitude for administration go into it because it’s the only way to get a pay hike and stop having to give enemas. I imagine that most industries have lots of administrators who ended up in the job solely for the extra cash or because they were terrible at what they were doing. It’s a bit depressing, because they’re almost always terrible bosses.

  11. Anonymous says:

    It’s worth noting that _MEDICAL MARIJUANA IS STILL ILLEGAL_. Yes, the controlled substances act is unconstitutional, but since no court has upheld that and since no state government can overrule it, marijuana, in all forms, for all purposes, is illegal throughout the entire US.

    So yes, when the school says they have a zero tolerance policy for illegal drugs, that’s exactly what they have. And yes, when they say that the student consuming the drugs at home is still illegal, they are entirely correct.

    Yes, that law is absurd. But it’s still the law. You can’t get too upset about a school obeying the law…

  12. Anonymous says:

    Colorado Springs. Derp of the Rockies.

  13. chgoliz says:

    Interestingly, they make the distinction that it’s not just the illegal form of marijuana that is forbidden: “no student may possess or consume medical marijuana on school grounds.”

    Does the school disallow insulin, inhalers, and epi pens too?

  14. Anonymous says:

    “the letter of the law, which is that no student”

    The law only applies to students? Really?

    I guess that explains why I haven’t heard of any stories of teachers getting busted for taking prescription meds while on school grounds.

    (Or about the bomb squad blowing up someone’s nitroglycerin pills.)

  15. Pantograph says:

    Will the kids on speed be banned as well?

  16. AbleBakerCharlie says:

    Blarg. First and foremost, the school district is apparently inhabited by high-order dolts who have zero conception of personal assessment. I don’t know how it is that whole sectors of civic life seem to accumulate people who apparently stayed home when discretion was handed out- did a school official who knew this poor, seizing child really feel compelled to pass this infraction up the chain? Christ, what an asshole.

    That being said, medical marijuana laws, as much as I sing their praises as delivering relief from suffering and marking steps towards relaxing absurd punitive restrictions on a low-harm substance, have always struck me as the sort of 11th-hour kludge that would invite exactly this kind of trouble in a world of ass-covering law-and-order bureaucrats, by effectively vacuuming four or five distinct groups into a suddenly visible legal shadowland. I certainly understand the notion that lowest-enforcement-priority and decriminalization and other soft-peddled winks and nudges are functionally as useful as law, but establishing an entirely different medical evaluation system to serve a single substance (whose biggest proponents are, let’s face it, interested in recreational uses) and to have that system have only intermittent repute, across jurisdictions that overlap, seems to be an exercises in tiptoeing past the sleeping tiger. Either THC is legal on the street corner or legal in ordinary clinical practice or it’s illegal- and the last is not a choice.

  17. redsquares says:

    Good thing they’re not looking for ‘internal possession’ of psychoactive tryptamines otherwise they’d have a major problem on their hands.

  18. kjulig says:

    When visiting a 4th grade German school I found that out of 24 students, 2 spoke 5 languages, 4 spoke 4, 16 spoke 3, and 2 were bilingual. They were learning calculus at the time. the level of their curriculum was about that of college courses here.

    That’s a really unusual school if that really was 4th grade (age 10?). I’m guessing most of the kids came from immigrant families?

    The standard would be very basic English at that age, somewhat fluent but not very good English and a not-quite-fluent second foreign language when graduating from high school. Maybe basic literacy in Latin but that’s becoming less and less common.

    That being said, that’s probably still much better then the situation in the US.

  19. futnuh says:

    In 1986 my friends and I went to see the Grateful Dead play in Massachusetts. We left Montreal in the middle of the night, smoking dope all the way to the US border. First question out of the border guard’s mouth, “Okay, where’s the pot?” We honestly replied, “We smoked it all on the way here.” To their credit, they let us continue – metabolites notwithstanding.

  20. Anonymous says:

    Time for Americans to learn what the citizens of Soviet Russia and Communist China have known for a long time – how to lie to the authorities. Americans are too naive, and expect the system to be fair and reasonable. It isn’t. If this were my kid, I would be telling him to keep quiet about his medication, especially to any school officials or administrators, and to lie about it if necessary. If the alternative is to deny the kid relief from his muscle spasms (and have any of you HAD chronic hiccups 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, for years on end? It’s no joke), I would not hesitate to do whatever is necessary to protect both his health and his education.

  21. ramon_omar says:

    Hey, convenient, the superintendent has a Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/SuperintendentMikeMiles

  22. Blue says:

    Fundementalism at its finest.

  23. IronEdithKidd says:

    This is beyond maddening. The kid is prescribed a medicine to control an otherwise uncontrolable condition, and the school believes they have the right to override the boy’s pysician? Really? If ever there was a time to get litigious, this is it.

  24. Anonymous says:

    It’s interesting that this is specific to THC lozenges which are not strictly speaking marijuana. THC preparations are (Marinol) are schedule III in the US which makes them less restricted than Marijuana (Schedule I) and the Adderall and methylphenidate (Schedule II) many of this students peers are likely taking.

  25. andreinla says:

    Blindly follow the rules or use reasoning? Wait, we are a school! WE HAVE NO CHOICE!

    • AirPillo says:

      Blindly follow the rules or use reasoning? Wait, we are a school! WE HAVE NO CHOICE!

      Well, yes, actually. That’s the point of zero tolerance policies. They do not allow individual administrators to actually make a choice. Nothing is at their discretion, it’s a simple IF->THEN conditional argument. This protects them from having any responsibility for making good decisions.

      The entire point of the policy was and always will be to give people carte blanche to make terrible decisions with no accountability, by simply forbidding them from making decisions at all.

  26. zyodei says:

    Let’s be honest about the stated original intent of public schools: they are to mold the minds of people to be subservient, and to stamp out differences in the population.

    That’s the stated purpose of the first public schools 100+ years ago, and not a lot has changed.

    “Public Schools” and “education” don’t have much in common.

  27. Blackbird says:

    So let me see if I get this right. Kid misses a lot of school due to an illness. Gets better with a PRESCRIPTION medication. School says you cannot take this medication AT school, or before GOING to school.
    In my view, the school has therefore DENIED access to a needed LEGAL medication.

    He is therefore left with two choices, MISS school due to either TAKING the medication…or NOT TAKING the medication and being ill.
    Either way they are denying him either an education AND a more healthy state of being.

  28. Anonymous says:

    “diaphragmatic myoclonus”???

    Ummm… I believe that’s hiccups. Not that I’m calling bullsh*t exactly but well…

  29. dudemanguy says:

    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again… how the fuck do I get off this planet?

  30. Anonymous says:

    Here’s what I never understand about these stories – why tell the motherfuckers at the school in the first place? Your medical history belongs to you, not to them. If he has to leave to take medicine, I don’t believe he has to tell them what medicine he is taking, especially if he doesn’t have it in his possession.

    • Cassandra says:

      Generally because if there’s an accident which the school nurse needs to help with, it’s good to have a medical file on hand in case giving a kid aspirin or penicillin is going to give them a severe allergic reaction and make them go into shock, or interact badly enough with the medication they’re on to give them a heart attack.

  31. Ceronomus says:

    While there were only a handful of comments to the Facebook page, and all of them were polite, Mr. Miles has deleted all comments having to do with this matter, booted the commentors, and has locked the page from outside comments.

    Nice huh? Rather than discuss, defend, or renounce this horrible decision, better to sweep it under the rug and be sued.

  32. Flibbertigibbet says:

    Admittedly suffering from chronic hiccups isn’t as glamorous as the AIDS and cancer patients who also rely on THC for relief. However, the entire scenario is ludicrous.

    They should test the district superintendents to see if they are also guilty of “internally possessing” any banned substances. I’m willing to bet that at least trace amounts of opiates, amphetamines, and marijuana are commonly found in any group of Americans.

  33. Anonymous says:

    How stupid and small minded. I would fear to raise my children in an environment like that.

  34. Anonymous says:

    Umm… telling somebody what FDA-approved medication they can or can’t take… isn’t that practicing medicine? As in, requires a license? So… does the district officials who made the rules have a medical license? And are the rules up to the current standard-of-care? If not… then you are looking at malpractice, and possibly federal felonies…

  35. Anonymous says:

    wow. The Banjo Music level in the southwest lately has been a bit on the loud side, don’cha think?

  36. ryane says:

    mandatory drug tests for the schoolboard.

    “Senator Greg Brophy, R-Wray, reached by email, said this: “Tragic. Zero tolerance policies are for people with zero intelligence.””

    Nice zinger.

  37. Anonymous says:

    How stupid. He shouldnt even have to go home. Parents or doctor should give the prescription to the school nurse or a teacher and he takes it in front of the nurse/teacher and never handles the stuff hisself.

  38. Anonymous says:

    wait, this is a school doing this? what is this, soviet russia, where student must teach SCHOOL?

  39. chriskarate says:

    Well, that’s Talibano Springs for you. Place is scary.

    • Keith says:

      And dark. Friend of mine grew up there and on her most recent visit she was informed that all the street lights were off at night because the city can’t afford to turn them on (because they cut taxes). But, private citizens are encouraged to adopt a streetlight and pay to have it turned on.

  40. bobthecitizen says:

    It is so worth it to have your kid suffer through all this to get the wonderful 33rd in the world level of education US schools provide.

    I mean, if your kid works hard, does college, gets a PHD, they can be considered the equivalent of a high school student from 20 other countries!

    I have had several friends who attempted to work overseas and had they’re “advanced degree” literally laughed at.

    When visiting a 4th grade German school I found that out of 24 students, 2 spoke 5 languages, 4 spoke 4, 16 spoke 3, and 2 were bilingual. They were learning calculus at the time. the level of their curriculum was about that of college courses here.

    If our country spent time in actual education, vs indoctrination and subjugation and vicous punishment, maybe we wouldn’t be seen as the moronic bullies of the world that we are.

    • knappa says:

      They were learning calculus at the time. the level of their curriculum was about that of college courses here.

      My cousins lived in Germany for a while and I have friends in the faculty at the Max-Planck-Institut für Mathematik. You either found some spectacularly exceptional example or are just plain full of crap.

      • kjulig says:

        To be fair, German secondary education is far more selective than US high schools so students really do learn stuff that is generally only taught in college in the US. Not saying that’s good or bad, just different.

    • AnthonyC says:

      I think you’re full of crap about Germany teaching calculus to 4th graders, but this I can believe easily: “I have had several friends who attempted to work overseas and had they’re “advanced degree” literally laughed at.” I knew a college sophomore who transferred to Harvard from somewhere in Eastern Europe to study physics, and he was taking graduate level classes the next semester. That said, his previous school had forced him to study much more narrowly- there *are* advantages, economic as well as academic, to a broader liberal arts education.

      • Anonymous says:

        He probably means 10th grade (US equivalent).
        If it is anything like the Belgian system, they probably count primary school from grade 1-6, and at the secondary school level restart the count from 1. Hence the 4th grade of secondary school.
        It seems logical that students at that age would speak more than 1 language. In Belgium, at that age, we had learned 3 or 4 languages (Dutch, French, English, German for those who didn’t study Latin).

  41. tamgoddess says:

    I don’t understand how they can tell whether he’s taken it or not. Why don’t they just lie?

    I mean, I get the stupidity of this decision, but it seems like a fairly easy workaround.

    • Keith says:

      Sure and then when the Principal decides the kid is lying and forces him to take a piss test, which comes back positive for THC and he gets expelled.

    • Cassandra says:

      They can probably tell he’s been taking his medicine if he doesn’t have seizures that day…

  42. Anonymous says:

    I would imagine the school might be on the hook for personal at-home tutoring if this made it all the way trough the courts.

  43. Anonymous says:

    Why aren’t laws and policies simpler? If a licenced medical doctor prescribes it, it should be allowed, plain and simple.

    Seriously, as someone pointed out upthread, more risk to other kids from the Vicodin.

    Also, how’d they find out? Next they’ll be doing mandatory pisstests for every student.

  44. Phikus says:

    How many kids attend classes with codeine cough medicine in their systems?
    Double standard x 0 tolerance = somehow less than zero?

    Calling Mr. Oswald with the swastika tattoo
    There is a vacancy waiting in the English voodoo
    Carving “V” for “vandal” on the guilty boy’s head
    When he’s had enough of that, maybe you’ll take him to bed
    To teach him he’s alive before he wishes he was dead

    Turn up the TV, no one listening will suspect
    Even your mother won’t detect it, so your father won’t know
    They think that I’ve got no respect but
    Everything is less than zero
    Hey, oo hey-ey
    Hey, oo hey-ey

  45. Anonymous says:

    The School in question has a contact form on its website.
    You could possibly let it know your views on the subject.

    http://sierra.hsd2.org/contact

  46. Anonymous says:

    Am I the only one who read “Colorado Springs” and “internal possession” and assumed it was a Christian school who thought that a demon had taken up residence inside the kid?

  47. ohyesitsme says:

    He is therefore left with two choices, MISS school due to either TAKING the medication…or NOT TAKING the medication and being ill.

    Either way they are denying him either an education AND a more healthy state of being.

    Right now I’m having trouble summoning the necessary faith in humanity to really believe that the catch-22 isn’t entirely unintentional. One less child to educate, and another tiny weight lifted from their catastrophic budget problems.

  48. ablebody says:

    “hey, man, is this principal cool?”
    “no, he’s not cool.”

  49. Anonymous says:

    Simplistic people using simplistic methods to deal with complex problems.

  50. Bill Beaty says:

    So, exactly why don’t they sue the people behind this highly illegal action? Go after the individuals. (Would the school district actually protect any administrator who pulls such illegal crap?)

    Ignorant bullies freely attack victims because they assume they’re protected, and their victim can’t hurt them. Lets see some punitive damages!

    • mn_camera says:

      …why don’t they sue the people behind this highly illegal action? Go after the individuals. (Would the school district actually protect any administrator who pulls such illegal crap?)

      They’d have to. Public officials are necessarily indemnified for actions taken within the scope of their function. (I worked in government in a previous life.)

  51. rebdav says:

    Had it been synthetic THC minus the other natural alkaloids and much more psychoactive it would be good old Marinol.
    https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Marinol#Dronabinol
    Marinol is schedule III, lower than the vicodin the kid in the story is permitted to take for pain. I wonder how many kids were forced at pain of expulsion to take schedule II Adderall?
    Of course the DEA considers marijuana a schedule I deadly drug with no medical use, so dangerous that nobody has ever overdosed.

  52. Anonymous says:

    Let’s see how the taxpayers in that community feel when the school district gets slapped with an inevitable (and warranted, in my opinion) civil rights lawsuit. The best thing this kid’s family can probably do at this point is to make the responsible party’s ignorance outrageously expensive.

  53. danfan says:

    “Internal possession” was how cops in Harlem used to bust junkie jazz musicians.

    There are few people dumber than zero-tolerance drug warriors.

  54. Anonymous says:

    Reminds me of the SNL skit about the airlines’ policy about taking aboard, any liquid, gel or substance that is more than 3oz. The skit evolved and the passenger asked, “what if I MAKE 3oz. Of liquid or gel DURING the flight”?
    Semantics.

  55. Ceronomus says:

    Is there any update on this story?

  56. Anonymous says:

    Isn’t THC a natural brain chemical? If it weren’t, why would our brains have receptors for it? Every human on the planet, including the school administration are in “internal possession”

  57. Anonymous says:

    Someone mentioned above that THC preparations are classified differently. What is the difference between a TC lozenge and a hard candy made with cannabis honey then?

  58. Cowicide says:

    Senator Greg Brophy, R-Wray, reached by email, said this: “Tragic. Zero tolerance policies are for people with zero intelligence.”

    This almost makes up for him being such a jerk otherwise.

  59. Mitch_M says:

    Ideally he should be able to take his medication openly, but being furtive about it is always an option.

    Children have to learn to be sneaky about disobeying unreasonable rules some time.

  60. starbreiz says:

    Someone mentioned above that THC preparations are classified differently. What is the difference between a TC lozenge and a hard candy made with cannabis honey then?

  61. MrMike says:

    Zero Tolerance = Zero Intelligence.

    Every single case of “Zero Tolerance” enforcement meets this definition as near as I can tell. It’s just another way of saying, “I’m going to mindlessly follow these rules and apply them to situations in ways that are ridiculously inappropriate, no matter what.”

  62. Anonymous says:

    The problem with the district’s policy is that *everyone* has similar compounds(endocannabinoids)in their blood stream; in fact, every person synthesizes endogenous endocannabinoids, which are thought to play a role in long term learning and memory. The (obviously silly) logical extension of this argument would then be that the school district should ban everyone from the school. The student does not even get high (according to the article).

  63. subhan says:

    Interesting test case here. If the kid were taking Marinol, which is legal at both the State & Federal levels, the school would very clearly be in the wrong and would likely be quite successfully sued by the parents. However, Federal law has been shown to trump State law when it comes to Medical MJ use (precedence exists in other states in workplace and employment law) I suspect the school’s policy is intended to prevent things like kids getting drunk or high off-property, then coming to school. Eventually one of these cases is going to make it to the Supreme court who will then likely find in favor of the Federal laws, as that is more beneficial to big pharma in the short run. The idiots don’t seem to get that if they legalize it, they can tax it & control it & make billions & billions with minimal research investment. Bleh.

  64. Cochituate says:

    last paragraph tears it for me:

    “The district has refused to comment to us, other than for a spokesperson to say that the district intends to follow the letter of the law, which is that no student may possess or consume medical marijuana on school grounds.”

    The child does not process the proscribed medicine on school grounds.
    The child takes the proscribed medicine at home.

    The district is in violation of their own rules and regulations (the the letter of the law, as they say). I hope this family OWNS these bastards before they’re done.

    • Cassandra says:

      They seem to be under the impression that metabolizing something is the same thing as consuming it, and since he is metabolizing it on school grounds, he is therefore consuming it. :(

  65. Sapa says:

    I don’t know how education systems work in US but here in UK if a child is registered with a school they have to attend or the parents are liable. However if a parent de-registers the child and informs the school that they are to be educated at home it is quite legal. A parent may choose whatever form of education they feel is appropriate as they have legal responsibility for educating their child.
    There are sites such as education-otherwise.org who will give legal advice and support

    • Ito Kagehisa says:

      In the USA it varies by state, Sapa.

      Some states require home schoolers to obtain teaching certificates or some other licensing nonsense, some require standardized test participation, some require that you register a lesson plan with the state or county authorities.

      In my state, you just say “later chumps, I’m taking my kid home” and after that your kid generally just ends up better educated and possibly less socialized* than the rest of his peers.

      *(this means he cannot name dozens of talentless media phenomena and has not played hundreds of video games that glorify murder, so he does not fit in with his peers socially)

  66. Anonymous says:

    can we stop with the “M” word already? it’s called Cannabis, people! sheesh.

  67. teapot says:

    System FAIL. Vilify the users they legally permit while ignoring the fact that high schools are probably the easiest place for kids to score weed.

  68. Blackbird says:

    I have another thought. I’m not sure how it works down there…
    If the school is a STATE ‘sponsored’ school…does it, where laws are different, follow the State Guidelines, or Federal?
    My point/question is this: Since the prescription is obviously legal by the State, can a school WITHIN that state ‘override’ the states law with a ‘matching’ federal law? I know that’s clear as mud, but I really don’t know how to explain it any better…

    I’ll give you an example of what I mean. In Ontario Canada, it is illegal to smoke in the workplace. This extends to vehicles FOR work purposes. My father drives a truck, and smokes in it. It is HIS truck, but under Ontario Law (since it is a workplace as well) he is not allowed to smoke in it. HOWEVER, since he crosses an international border, he is bound by Federal rules regarding workplace situations. Therefore, though banned by the province, he can disregard those rules since his workplace is covered under Federal Law.

  69. Sapa says:

    To add to the above all you have to do is tell the school to take them off the register, they will resist a little such as saying they will check with the local education authority, but if you stand your ground they cannot do a single thing to stop you from home educating.
    I did this for one of my sons who was having a lot of problems at school in the last year there and I do not regret it at all.

  70. elk says:

    From a practical standpoint this seems on par with bringing internal thoughts of drugs to school.

    Wait though…I didn’t account for the potential market for barfed-up THC pills.

  71. Chevan says:

    Often it’s not so much the case that your brain has enzymes or receptors that fit a certain molecule; it would be more accurate to say that your brain has an enzyme or receptor that can accept a certain range of structural and chemical properties.

    This is one way drugs are made: we look at substances with known effects in the body and tweak them slightly. Maybe we add or remove a functional group or maybe we replace an atom. Point is, we make some small change that doesn’t produce a significantly different molecule. Then, when that new chemical enters the body, the body ‘recognizes’ it – it’s close enough that it can be accepted by the body.

    This happens naturally, too, not just with designed molecules. Sometimes a chemical gets stuck in an enzyme or reacts with a molecule and prevents it from binding.

    I don’t know the specifics of THC’s interactions in the body, so I can’t speak to that. But I do know it’s not so cut and dried as to say that we have a receptor for it.

  72. MarkM says:

    I think this is a win/win situation.
    Parents sue school district.
    School district pays LOTS of money:
    they’ll easily win a civil judgment.
    Kid gets his college fund and vindication.
    School looks stupid and people responsible lose their job.

    • TNGMug says:

      I couldn’t agree more. These bastards have a job to do – provide education. Their job is not to be petty tin-pot dictators who make up their own rules to enforce.

      I do hope this child’s parent’s sue.

  73. Avram / Moderator says:

    Not for the first time, I am stunned by the sheer nightmarish sociopathy of some school administrators. What the hell is wrong with our culture that we not only produce these bastards, but go on to entrust them with the care and education of our young?

  74. Finnagain says:

    I think it’s time for the Balkanization of these various States. I hereby invite any sane people living there to move to Oregon. Make our state saner, please.

    I’m pro-Secession and I vote!

  75. Anonymous says:

    We’ve got a suicide watch on my 14-year-old son.

    Thanks, America’s mothers, who overwhelmingly support “zero tolerance” politicians.

    Thanks for crushing my family when my son never hurt anyone, never threatened anyone, never intended to hurt anyone.

    Thanks for turning a brilliant, motivated boy with stellar grades into a morose, trembling, sad young man who is now a magnet for equally troubled girls covered with self-inflicted razor scars and looking for a “bad boy”.

    Zero Tolerance. That’s how it works. Dead kids, ruined lives, shattered families. Zero tolerance for childhood, zero tolerance for children. Once the children are dead, then they aren’t a problem any more. Hooray! Serves those bad kids right! How dare they take medicine, or carry a pocketknife!

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/01/22/AR2011012203873.html

    http://www.apa.org/monitor/oct06/tolerance.aspx

    http://www.indiana.edu/~safeschl/ztze.pdf

    http://www.splcenter.org/get-informed/publications/suspended-education

  76. kattw says:

    Eh, strictly speaking, the science isn’t THAT terrible. He’s still got the active drug floating around in his blood stream, other wise the lozenges wouldn’t work. Additionally, the lozenges COULD be designed to be long lasting/slow release, so he might even have some large particulate in his gut, and not merely solvated active ingredient in the blood stream. So, technically, some kid COULD, like, siphon off his blood, distill the active drug, and consume it.

    That being said, that remains a ludicrously unlikely situation, and the school’s decision is stupid. But it’s not actually that scientifically illiterate, at least re: metabolites and such.

    • CANTFIGHTTHEDITE says:

      Yes, but if we’re following the letter of the law, then the kid is digesting and metabolizing, not consuming.

      Also, with vampires being so popular with the kids these days, blood siphoning is a major concern.

  77. Bloodboiler says:

    Why is student’s prescription medication any of school’s business? I doubt these idiots would have ever found out on their own what this kid’s medication contains.

    It doesn’t even take some rare condition to have a legitimate reason to have some ominous sounding drugs in and on you:
    - Allergy medication may be technically amphetamine.
    - Asthma medication probably contain steroids.
    - Depression medication may function like freaking cocaine.

    p.s. I’m not a doctor.

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