Undoing the effects of pre-photography "Photoshop"

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7 Responses to “Undoing the effects of pre-photography "Photoshop"”

  1. liquidself says:

    the artist is assumed to be the epitome of subjectivity”””””””””””””””””’

    The artist is assumed to be the epitome of “subjectivity” and must therefore be corrected through “objective” scientific technigue; though it may be possible that these two have engaged in a guile-less artistic endeavor without realizing it. This is another in a long history of ridiculous “scientific” attempts to re·con·noi·ter visual culture; remember that art is more precise than science.

  2. chgoliz says:

    Saggier cheeks and lower eyebrows are common changes as we age. The difference between a painting of a young man and a photograph of an old man might not be entirely explained by vanity or artist license.

  3. deckard68 says:

    So in real life everyone had a grey layer floating around their head? I don’t get this either.

  4. Jesse M. says:

    This is a cool project but the writer’s notion that this will finally show us what George Washington really looked like is a bit misleading, in fact we already have a life mask of Washington: The real face of George Washington

  5. ManOutOfTime says:

    Brilliant! I had never seen a photograph of JQA before — fantastic! I had no idea he looked like Jacobim Mugatu.

    Love the photo of Daniel Webster, too — I wish more of our leaders looked like that today! As much as the Teabaggers fetishize our Founding Fathers, it’s interesting to note that ‘Baggers tend to be beyond square in their appearance, putting on powdered wig or tricorn hat drag but not really embracing the look and making a statement. I wonder if they would modernize the representation of their heroes if they could — the way Stuart made Webster into a Jane Austenesque fop, or the way European artists turned the Mediterranean Jesus into a doughy effete whitey.

  6. Sekino says:

    I guess they’re saying that it’s a work in progress… But I have trouble seeing how the current results help with likeness any more than the paintings.

    On all the ‘models’ the noses could cut glass and the mouths look tiny and puckered in. Everyone look like this:

    o o
    |
    v

  7. JM says:

    I didn’t understand at all… for all I know, I’m looking at a cropped pic of a portrait. Can anybody help, please?

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