3D typography made by folding pages in books

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8 Responses to “3D typography made by folding pages in books”

  1. oheso says:

    It’s gorgeous. My mother used to spend hours making snowmen and other Christmas decorations out of discarded paperbacks. She would spraypaint them in gold or silver and glue on final bits of decoration.

  2. Anonymous says:

    Throw Away Your Books, Rally in the Streets!

    One day I’ll figure out how to make an artwork which combines cutting up books, destroying a piano, taxidermy, 3D printing, uncomfortable-looking staircases/chairs and steampunk, it’ll cause the most popular concern-trolling comments frenzy ever seen on boingboing. :)

  3. ChibiR says:

    It’s impressive, but no matter how much I tell myself that this is beautiful, all I can see is a destroyed book. :(

  4. Anonymous says:

    Scrutinizing the flickr gallery right now, I see that…

    -the book pictured here is indeed The Sands of Pride by William R. Trotter
    -the one with the 3D text “Faith” is a Catholic Bible.
    -the one with that says “Eclipse” is Eclipse, the Twilight book
    -one of the ones that says “Create” is The Shadow of Blooming Grove: Warren G. Harding In His Times by Francis Russell
    -the one that says “Chris” is the Da Vinci Code.
    -the one that says “Corrie” is another Da Vinci Code
    -the one that says “Love” is “A Natural History of Love” by Diane Ackerman
    -the one with the 3D paw is The Night Lives On: The Untold Stories & Secrets Behind the Sinking of the Unsinkable Ship-Titanic by Walter J. Lord

    Conclusion: Mr. Salazar’s (beautiful) papercraft hasn’t deprived the human race of any esoteric knowledge, although there’s a fair chance that he’ll be smited by God or vampirized to death by Twilight fans. also, I have too much time on my hands.

  5. pyramus says:

    It IS just a book, of which there are billions in the world, most of them unread and unimportant. Maybe this one is a really bad romance novel by a third-tier writer, or a tedious history by some hack with an unearned Ph.D. Can you really shed tears over it?

    And even if you were inclined to weep, the book isn’t destroyed. You could unfold all of those pages–which are just a slightly more extreme version of the dogeared pages that some avid, book-loving readers create–and you have a readable copy once again.

    The book is almost certainly more valuable as a work of art than as a book.

  6. Anonymous says:

    I can tentatively identify the book as a novel called The Sands of Pride by William R. Trotter, but it’s hard to tell without a higher-resolution image.

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