1036cbCOMIC gm - close call.jpg Discuss

36 Responses to “TOM THE DANCING BUG: How Will God-Man Handle This "Close Call"?!”

  1. techsoldaten says:

    How did he get surprised with her walking into the closet? How come there was not already a lock on the closet door? If he is omnipotent and omniscient, he would not have been caught off guard, she would not have seen him, and it would not have mattered even if she did.

    This is no more than an attempt to cast a creator god as an arbitrary being with no care for his creations. I respect good questions about divine powers when they are consistent with the canon. This comic either means God Man is meant to be someone other than judeo-christian God or that the author does not understand the powers that traditionally have been assigned to him.

    The one thing that really has me wondering is the need for a secret identity. The arguments comics sometimes make about one’s primary identity are being explored here when they would not necessarily apply. God, in the judeo-christian sense, is depicted as part of the Trinity, a being that is one and multiple at the same time (the father, the son and the holy spirit). In other words, he can exist in 2 places at once, as separate beings, that are part of a whole. He could be the milksop and Godman at the same time. I don’t know why he would not be.

    Alan Moore would have a ball with these inconsitencies. I wonder what this means about Godman and who he truly is.

    • Anonymous says:

      > How did he get surprised with her walking into the closet?
      > How come there was not already a lock on the closet door?
      > If he is omnipotent and omniscient, he would not have
      > been caught off guard, she would not have seen him, and
      > it would not have mattered even if she did.

      Agree, God-Man always show measure in his reactions, like when Adam and Eve eat an apple and he condemned all their descendants for eternity.

  2. Mister44 says:

    Confused why this is the subject this week. It’s not like another important event ripe for political satire occurred.

  3. ill lich says:

    I wonder if Pat Robertson believes in God-man, and if not, does that make him an atheist?

  4. JustOk says:

    Maybe we are just God’s alpha version of the universe.

  5. Anonymous says:

    Wouldn’t it be easier to just remove her memory? The Silents can do it, heck they can even have it auto-update, no monitoring required.

  6. Anonymous says:

    I noticed the other day that Percival Dunwoody, Idiot Traveler of Time and Space always seems to have first post on these comics. How does he post so fast? Is it the cartoonist, with a sort of “alt text” in the form of a comment?
    Then I realized, “Duh, time-traveler.”

  7. Lobster says:

    Milksop?

    • benher says:

      If you didn’t say it, I was going to.

      Also, PERCIVAL DUNWOODY!!! MORE PLAEASSEEE,OKAYTHANKSBYE!!11

  8. Anonymous says:

    Wait, god believes in evolution? Does that mean he has to dissapear in a puff of logic?

  9. Keneke says:

    How could you possibly feel that way? I feel the opposite! You’re stupid!

    /thread

  10. Art Carnage says:

    > Not to me. I’ve never believed that what a weird and wonderful
    > place the world is should depend on how it came about.
    >
    > An omnipotent God-Man created it? Great! That’s amazing!
    > Random occurrence? Also great! That’s also amazing!

    Actually it was the result of a TL1477Q/S “Request to Create Universe” form being filled out in triplicate, notarized, and submitted to the main office, with the required $17 filing fee. Not so special now, eh?

  11. Mark Crummett says:

    In The Beginning, God-Man created…folding chairs?

  12. Percival Dunwoody says:

    The future organisms of this three-mooned planet will wonder why supply closet doors lock from the inside. A PBS documentary will explain that it’s an unnecessary but quaint custom that dates back to the Renaissance. -Percival Dunwoody, Idiot Traveler of Time and Space

  13. Uthor says:

    But he never renouces his US citizenship, right?

  14. zyodei says:

    I’ve always enjoyed the theory that humanity is an alien genetic experiment, and every encounter with Gods or Angels over the ages have simply been primitive descriptions of UFOs and aliens and whatnot…

    • Teller says:

      What? We’re not reverse mutations of apes from when the earth’s polarity shifted and the Van Allen radiation belt bombarded us?

  15. Anonymous says:

    I like the implication that if there was evidence of god actually existing that he would destroy us.

  16. Jellodyne says:

    That’s what happens when you see God-man’s Higgs Boson.

  17. SAMO1415 says:

    Let this be a lesson to investigative journalists: KNOCK FIRST!

  18. Anonymous says:

    i wonder why god chose spandex…

  19. xzzy says:

    Lesson learned: don’t go snooping around in broom closets, you might destroy the universe.

  20. nanuq says:

    Bill Gaines is God-man? Who knew?

  21. David A says:

    Incidentally, scientists are finding that it’s plausible that life just arose from inanimate chemicals.

    Already showing the components of RNA, Protein creation, and self replication in the lab.
    http://wired.com/wiredscience/2009/05/ribonucleotides/
    physorg.com/news186071435.html
    dailygalaxy.com/my_weblog/2011/04/was-it-the-ultimate-origin-of-life-biologists-create-self-replicating-rna-molecule.html

    Add to that the billions of galaxies in the universe, and billions of years it’s been around.

    Carbon based “Life” could likely be an entirely random coincidence.

    • NoctilucentStudios says:

      That could be true,and if it is how we really came to be on this planet, that has to rank as THE most depressing fact ever.

      Ever.

      • Anonymous says:

        Why so? Can’t we accept miracles for what they are: Miraculous? What’s depressing about that?

      • dr_awkward says:

        Depressing? Why? You state your postulate as though it’s irrefutably true without evidence.

        Evidence.

      • SamSam says:

        Really? I think it’s most scientist’s default hypothesis, besides the hypothesis that these same amino acids and what-not were created completely randomly in some other part of the universe, and were carried to Earth by a random comet.

        I don’t see why it should be depressing. You find the idea that, given enough time, random molecules could start to chain together, reproduce, find strategies to survive, and eventually paint the Sistine Chapel or compose symphonies “depressing?”

        I find it wonderfully amazing.

      • fnc says:

        Not to me. I’ve never believed that what a weird and wonderful place the world is should depend on how it came about.

        An omnipotent God-Man created it? Great! That’s amazing!
        Random occurrence? Also great! That’s also amazing!

        • Donald Petersen says:

          I’m with SamSam and fnc on this one. As a kid, I always wanted there to be ghosts, vampires, monsters under the bed, the Loch Ness Monster, Sasquatch, gnomes, wizards, hobbits, what have you. Even angels and demons, relatively boring though they seemed to me, would be preferable to a complete absence of the supernatural. And as I grew up, I’d get depressed knowing that no matter how dark the night would get, the worst that could happen to me would be some utterly mundane mugging or murder or kidnapping or run-of-the-mill natural disaster. No alien abductions for me, nor even a narrow escape from a pack of werewolves. Eventually I even consigned God-Man and His angelic host, along with Old Scratch and his infernal hordes, to same cardboard carton in the attic where I stashed the rest of my childhood boogeymen and fantasies.

          And yet the world is filled with so much wonder and beauty, both “natural” and manmade. Rather than sulking about the idea that we’re nothing more than animate piles of carbon wandering around for a few decades before we dissolve back into dust, I’ve come to embrace the loveliness of the idea that all this wonderful stuff didn’t need to be created by an omnipotent Creator. It’s nifty to think that the whole thing could be nuked from orbit, and after a few million years the world could again be filled with teeming, possibly sentient, possibly artistic, possibly far superior life.

          Myself, I find that scenario preferable to existing at the whims of a deity, however benevolent.

          • Scurra says:

            Now you see I came to a similar conclusion as you, in that it was fairly easy for me to consign “God-Man” to the attic too and to agree that the Universe is amazing enough not to need some omnipotent Creator.
            And yet I still believe in God. Just not in “God-Man” – who is obviously a nonsensical idea anyway. Heck, even that oh-so-reliable source The Bible pretty much abandons it as an idea pretty quickly, although I suspect that a lot of people don’t actually realise that, because it’s so much easier to make fun of “Zeus” than it is to engage with issues such as the mind or the soul or the paradox of faith; or perhaps that it’s easier to discuss the evolutionary biological imperatives that lead to injustice in the world than it is to actually do something about it…

            (I thought the cartoon was quite funny, btw. But then I’m as fond of Zeus jokes as the next man. Providing the next man isn’t Thor, of course.)

          • Baron Karza says:

            Okay, but now you have to tell a good Zeus joke.

  22. EeyoreX says:

    Milton Baxter is a dead ringer for William M. Gaines, circa 1985…

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