French proposal: any URL to be arbitrarily blacklisted without due process

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25 Responses to “French proposal: any URL to be arbitrarily blacklisted without due process”

  1. Anonymous says:

    How long until Anonymous or Lulsec hacks them and adds every French government website to the blacklist?

  2. Drabula says:

    No doubt these western governments have been keeping on eye on the role of the net in middle east uprisings….as they talk out of one side of their mouths in support, they are issuing orders for a kill switch in their own countries. Look at recent US posturing about ‘cyber acts of war’ and well…..*sigh*…nevermind.

  3. yopdiesel says:

    I’ll leave France in a couple of months to go live in China. Yep, I’m 10 years ahead of my time…

  4. Boba Fett Diop says:

    Seems like this would pretty easily run afoul of articles 7, 13, and 14 of the Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen of 1793.

    Perhaps Sarkozy should re-acquaint himself with that document, particularly articles 25, 27 and 33.

  5. Anonymous says:

    @delt664

    “Why does French government hate the internet” would have been a better question.

  6. afs97209 says:

    The French are gonna treat the internet like they treat hotel maids.

  7. Anonymous says:

    This is such a good idea that I propose it be applied to all government employees as well.

    Anyone can make an accusation and the employee will be thrown in prison until such time they can prove they’re not guilty.

    • Gulliver says:

      @ Anon #23

      This is such a good idea that I propose it be applied to all government employees as well.
      Anyone can make an accusation and the employee will be thrown in prison until such time they can prove they’re not guilty.

      Even the prison guards? Aim that policy at the policy-makers (politicians and top-level bureaucrats) and it’ll be a better deterrent than aiming it at everyone who takes a government job. Someone’s gotta sweep the streets.

  8. Anonymous says:

    The problem I always see with things like this is just how close they are to the absurdity of shooting a hologram.

    It’s a gardener dealing with a bush that grows faster than it can be managed, pruned and coaxed into a pretty, aesthetically pleasing figure. A detailed pruning and consideration of each branch is an extremely hard undertaking for an extrinsic entity, and broad samurai-like slashes hurt the plant, and the result is a horrible looking bush, very similar to what a child’s attempt would look like.
    Perhaps we are child-like in this game of governing ourselves.

    They seem to not understand that their previously monolithic power to manage things, which, broadly speaking, used to be the only one in the land, can now exist outside of their turf too.

    “The Land” literally has entities that can stand up as high as government in terms of capacity – on this particular issue, mind you.

    The Government group decides “We’ll do this”, and if enough people disagree with it, it actually is possible to stand up and say: “No, you won’t” and you are effectively capable of standing up by that in the face of the groupg charged with the function of managing things. People will swerve around the bars and manage themselves.

    The dynamics of this interaction are much closer to a street-level altercation with a person with a different opinion than they are to the “Majestic and Unquestionable Power above dealing with the plebeians down below” picture.

    There will be times where, at the end of the day, you have a group of human beings dealing with another group of human beings, both sides with the same technical capacity, and I think the group of human beings in government has to come to grips with the fact that its relationship with others is going to inevitably change, whether it likes it or not. It shouldn’t forget that it is there because the people decided to put it there, hundreds of years ago. It didn’t spring out of the ground, like some deity from mythology.

    Some might see government as the father in this picture, and the people as the children. But this could just as easily be seen the other way around.

    And I sincerely surprise myself sometimes by saying things like this. It seems impossible but it really isn’t a stretch when you live in a world with situations that almost force you to think this.

    But this is, of course, my own personal opinion.

  9. DomoDomo says:

    Do no harm 个屁.

  10. astrochimp says:

    Where my liberté at?

  11. gravytop says:

    Syntax-check your first sentence … I think it’s missing a “may” or “can” between “agencies” and “to.”

  12. Anonymous says:

    So, this draft executive order is a “French proposal”?

    Perhaps in the same way that extraordinary rendition is an “American proposal”?

    If you mistake Sarkozy and his goons for “the French”, don’t be surprised when people mistake Bush and his goons for “the Americans”.

    • Gulliver says:

      @ Anon #14

      So, this draft executive order is a “French proposal”?
      Perhaps in the same way that extraordinary rendition is an “American proposal”?
      If you mistake Sarkozy and his goons for “the French”, don’t be surprised when people mistake Bush and his goons for “the Americans”.

      Cory’s Canadian and makes his home in London. He did spend a year in residency at my alma mater, USC, and travels to the States frequently – and is welcome at my table any time – but he’s not technically an American citizen or resident.

      I believe he met this was a proposal of the French government, since it is common shorthand to designate a government by the country it governs. Rest assured, no thinking person would believe this kick in the teeth is what the French themselves want.

  13. va-j-j says:

    So the french government don’t know what dns servers are?

  14. delt664 says:

    Why does France hate the internet?

  15. Anonymous says:

    jeez, our president is definitely a real douche… He seems to forget that people will have to vote next year… Hopefully my people won’t forget this when the election time comes…

  16. Anonymous says:

    Surely not the French?

    Afterall, they created the International Olympic Committee and FIFA. Both obviously highly regarded for their lack of corruption.

  17. GuidoDavid says:

    Contre nous de la tyrannie. L’étendard sanglant est levé…

  18. pKp says:

    While that’s obviously horrifying, I have little doubt that it will end up like HADOPI : the Conseil Constitutionnel (the organism tasked with checking the constitutionnality of new laws) will neuter it by imposing the presence of a judge somewhere in the loop. Not only are these guys relatively ethical, nearly all of them are old-school Gaulliste (traditional right) politicians who hate and despise Sarkozy, including the previous Président, Jacques Chirac.
    That said, it is still pretty awful. I need to leave this country…

    • Anonymous says:

      I need to leave this country…

      And go where? Where can you go that isn’t grinding down freedom, bit by bit?

  19. Anonymous says:

    The group in charge of this blacklist will be called the “Comité de salut public”.

    • Gulliver says:

      @ Anon #10

      The group in charge of this blacklist will be called the “Comité de salut public”.

      That ain’t even funny.

      *shudders*

  20. Cowicide says:

    Fascism is the new due process.

  21. Anonymous says:

    No self respecting programmer will help build this, and as a result it will be fragile and easily broken.

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