Muslim hate crime victim asks TX court to spare life of white supremacist who shot him

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70 Responses to “Muslim hate crime victim asks TX court to spare life of white supremacist who shot him”

  1. bardfinn says:

    I grew up in Dallas. A kid who was in Boy Scouts alongside me, showed signs early on of being a sociopath. As a young adult, he murdered a Sikh gas station attendant for twenty dollars. He “converted” to Christianity in prison, got out early on good behaviour and his father’s request (his father was an exec in the BSA), and moved to the NW US.

    If /HE/ got out of prison, and didnt suffer the death penalty, the murderer in question here should not be killed.

    Unfortunately, Rick Perry, Texas’ governor, is the kind of Republican that Republicans think is an unfair cartoon stereotype – evangelical Christian hypocrite who uses taxpayer money to promote Christianity, and talks about the sanctity of the life of the unborn fetus, but is a proponent of the death penalty.

    There’s no money or pandering to his constituency in it for Perry, so this man is going to die.

    Special circle in hell.

  2. Gordon JC Pearce says:

    The problem with killing the murderer is that you end up getting his victim’s blood all over you.

    • purple-stater says:

      Mental Haz-Mat suit. Just read over the tale of how he decided to kill multiple innocents and still has no regret. Takes the stains right out.

  3. Anonymous says:

    I applaud Mr. Bhuiyan for his compassion. I wish there were more people in the world like him.

  4. fromme2u says:

    911 hurt so many people you can not count them all. It hurt Americans, Arabs, Indians, EVERYONE IN THE WORLD. 911 continues to hurts us all. I am a Muslim, I worked for the Government of this country before 911 and after. Before I was a coworker after I was an enemy, not to be trusted. Nothing about me changed, the attitude changed. I was working the phones on 911 (helping people figure out their pay). One man called from the Pentagon he was alive however walls had come down and he could not get out, I don’t know if he lived or died. He called and did not want to e alone, he had no one else, I talked to him until he quit talking. 3 days later I spoke to an elderly woman who wanted to know how we could help her keep her son’s car that might be taken as he died in 911 and she could not qualify for the loan (we all got together at work and bought the car for her she never knew who paid for it.) That same day I went to the funeral of a woman and her unborn child that had been killed by white teenagers angry over 911. The stoned her in her yard and no one stopped them. It was a crazy time. In 911 in 2006 my son was attached after the TV had shown 911 all day, the police would not even look for who did it, stating he deserved who he got. I am 9th generation American and a member of my family has fought in every war this country has been in. I think this man should be forgiven and he should be freed. He was not thinking clearly, he was upset (as where we all). He has a family that was hurt as well. 911 can not stop hurting us until we make it stop. This has to stop. Any other time in the state of Texas if you are enraged and hurt someone you do not get the death penalty. I believe he was given death as a way to try to appease the Islamic community. I say let him go, I believe he has learned from this. Does not the bible teach an eye for an eye vengeance is mine thus saith the lord. Meaning God will take care of it. I believe he is sorry and as a society (providing he was a citizen in good standing in the past)we should forgive him and not kill him. Islam does teach forgiveness and if the victim forgives then we should too.

  5. Ty_MY says:

    Good point made by someone above about the Governor being pro-Christian, but champions death penalty.

    All those braying for death :

    He who has not sinned, cast the first stone?

  6. Ipo says:

    When you put supreme whity to death he is not getting punished any longer.
    While his victims are.

  7. Sam125 says:

    Hm, moreso than sparing a murderer’s life, I’d be more interested in his underlying motive. Someone isn’t just filled with so much hatred that they’ll premeditate a murder. Someone or a series of unfortunate events had to have triggered this man’s murder.

    I wish I were a psychologist so I could study this condemned man and learn why he did what he did so other people don’t go doing it too. After all, what separates this person from the Columbine shooters? Seemingly just a few years in age.

  8. Mitch_M says:

    Mr Stroman does not show any remorse for his actions. He believes that he acted with good intentions but made an error:

    “I am a human being and made a terrible mistake out of love, grief and anger, and believe me, I am paying for it every single minute of the day.”

    He gave his victims’ families the finger in court.

    The South Asians I’ve seen working at gas stations are fine people working hard to earn a living. The Sikhs who own the station I go to every day are always very nice to me and doing business with them always ends my day on a positive note.

    Stroman carried out the premeditated murder of two such people simply because he thought they looked like Arabs. He didn’t even bother to ask what they thought about the attacks on the Twin Towers.

    For his crime, lack of remorse, and contempt for his victims’ families he deserves the most severe punishment available, whatever that may be.

    Grace means getting much better than you deserve. It is admirable for his only surviving victim, the man he blinded for the offense of looking like an Arab, to want him to be treated with grace.

  9. Gulliver says:

    Mr. Bhuiyan’s compassion is exemplary, but the victims that did not survive are not here to forgive. Stroman forfeited his own life when he premeditatedly took the lives of others in cold blood. There is no other punishment proportional to his crime. His decision was tragic, but it was his decision. His life is no more valuable than that of any of his victims.

    • Brainspore says:

      There is no other punishment proportional to his crime. His decision was tragic, but it was his decision.

      A “proportional” sentence isn’t what we should strive for in a civilized society; what we need is an “appropriate” sentence. For some crimes the only way to have proportional punishment is to put the perpetrator through a daily regimen of rape and torture, but it would dehumanize us all to support the use of torturers and rapists for any reason.

      As you say the murders were his decision. What to do about him is ours.

    • Avram / Moderator says:

      “His life is no more valuable than that of any of his victims.”

      And killing them was wrong, so how is killing Stroman right?

      If Stroman’s death would bring his dead victims back from the dead, then yeah, I could see it. But it won’t. It’s just more death.

      • Gulliver says:

        And killing them was wrong, so how is killing Stroman right?

        They did nothing to deserve what he did to them. He murdered them. What other punishment would be proportional to that transgression?

        If Stroman’s death would bring his dead victims back from the dead, then yeah, I could see it. But it won’t. It’s just more death.

        If the only purpose of punishment were to change behavior, then I would agree with you. But another purpose is to deter those that would do likewise. Otherwise there would be no reason to sentence anyone to life in prison without possibility of parole.

        • freshacconci says:

          Yeah, that deterrence thing is working out real well, especially in Texas. Record number of executions and the murder rate is, um….

          • purple-stater says:

            Compared to the number of repeat offenders though…

          • travtastic says:

            That’s really cute and all, but there are other options aside from killing people and letting them free. Ask the rest of the civilized world.

          • purple-stater says:

            Locking them up does not preclude the options to escape or to be released for faked “good behavior”. Nor does it remove their ability to negatively influence other prisoners who otherwise be redeemable.

            Stroman has demonstrated an ability to lash out, lethally and in a premeditated manner, against innocent people. In my neighborhood, around my family, I find there to be a zero level of acceptable risk with a person like this. Through his actions he willingly placed himself outside of societies boundaries of acceptable behavior and there is only ONE certain way to guaranty that he does not do so again. I also see no reason why the society he placed himself outside of should bear the burden of providing for him until he reaches a natural end.

          • travtastic says:

            Maybe you don’t understand how this works. He would not be near your family, or in your neighborhood, or any neighborhood. He would be in prison. There are plenty of sentences available which would never allow his release.

            Name me ‘one certain way’ to make sure a thief never steals again.

          • purple-stater says:

            [quote]Maybe you don’t understand how this works. He would not be near your family, or in your neighborhood, or any neighborhood. He would be in prison. There are plenty of sentences available which would never allow his release.

            Name me ‘one certain way’ to make sure a thief never steals again.
            [/quote]

            He could murder somebody in prison; that could be a guard, visitor, or another inmate. The potential to get out of prison also exists. While a thief may indeed steal again, that is a crime which merely violates property, which can be replaced, whereas this person has seen fit to violate, without remorse, another persons life.

            Many people have made the case that we need our prisons to focus more on rehabilitation, rather than punishment, and I would like to see that myself. But if a person shows no remorse, the necessary first step, rehabilitation cannot begin. From that point on we do have limited resources available and I, for one, would prefer that we spend them on the rehabilitable and others that cannot help themselves.

          • travtastic says:

            We do not have limited resources available, at least in the sense you’re implying. This is an absurdly rich country we live in.

            This is not an issue of common sense budgeting, any more than it would be to kill repeat offenders of minor crimes.

            Being so stingy with other people’s money, I’d love to hear your take on health care for the terminally ill. I mean, they’re probably not going to get better, right?

          • freshacconci says:

            Except of course that deterrence is about preventing others from committing the same crime. But I think you know that.

          • quickbrownfox says:

            Except of course that deterrence is about preventing others from committing the same crime. But I think you know that.

            Not quite. “Deterrence,” as it is used in the criminal justice context, encompasses two concepts: specific deterrence and general deterrence. General deterrence is about preventing others from committing the same crime. But specific deterrence refers to the goal of preventing the specific offender from offending again.

    • travtastic says:

      His life is no more valuable than that of any of his victims.

      As good a reason as any to not execute him then, no?

      The bottom line: death penalty deterrence does not work, and we should not be trying to speak for the dead using our own voices and opinions.

      • Gulliver says:

        As good a reason as any to not execute him then, no?

        On the contrary. Allowing him to live out his life sets his life above that of his victims. Society may be Stroman’s executioner, but he deliberately chose to carry out actions with very clear consequences. I wish he had not done so – for the sake of his victims, himself and society – but he did.

        The bottom line: death penalty deterrence does not work, and we should not be trying to speak for the dead using our own voices and opinions.

        I have no interest in society speaking for the dead. If Mr. Bhuiyan were the sole victim and he advocated total amnesty in spite of the assault, I would still not support letting Stroman go free. Putting the fate of criminals in the hands of their victims would be a bad idea, IMHO.

        It is not the death penalty itself which is a better deterrent, but the treating of all life as equal. If I knew of a more humane punishment proportional to the crime Stroman committed, I would advocate for that. But I know of no other punishment that would not set his life above his victims.

        I’ve said this before, but I want to emphasize that I have no desire to offend those that disagree with me. Capital punishment is, rightfully so, an emotional issue. Only the inequality of human life disturbs me more than loss of human life. Someone asked if those who support the use of capital punishment would take the job of executioner. If no one else would take the job, then yes, I would take it. I would also kill to defend myself or loved ones from harm. In either case I would probably have a mental breakdown, but I would not ask of others what I would not myself do. Just thinking about thinking about it makes me want to hurl.

        • travtastic says:

          It is not the death penalty itself which is a better deterrent, but the treating of all life as equal. If I knew of a more humane punishment proportional to the crime Stroman committed, I would advocate for that. But I know of no other punishment that would not set his life above his victims.

          This is dangerous territory that you’re wandering into, this eye-for-an-eye logic. Should we start raping rapists, hand out beatings for assault cases? Or is this a one-off, special event? Should we find a Muslim man willing to shoot this guy in the face?

          • Gulliver says:

            This is dangerous territory that you’re wandering into, this eye-for-an-eye logic. Should we start raping rapists, hand out beatings for assault cases? Or is this a one-off, special event? Should we find a Muslim man willing to shoot this guy in the face?

            I never said the punishment should be the crime. I said it should be proportional, meaning it should fit the crime. I understand you think death is too severe a punishment for any crime however heinous. But don’t conflate proportionality with sameness. I loath vengeance. Rape and other forms of assault can be punished proportionally without subjecting the transgressor to what they did to their victim(s).

          • travtastic says:

            True. Clearly this situation calls for a civilized, dignified murder, befitting an enlightened society.

  10. semiotix says:

    Odd, normally words like “devout” are like waving a red flag at a bull. I guess it doesn’t count if he does something nice.

  11. BrocasBrian says:

    My first thought is why did he immigrate to Texas? What bad luck.

  12. chgoliz says:

    I grew up in a family of violent criminals. It was an abusive family over many generations, and the alcoholism was certainly a big factor in all that. My brother was a kind, gentle person underneath it all, but was driven to lashing out violently because of the desperation he felt and could not understand. An uncle killed himself as the only way he could see out of the toxic environment. I became the perfect victim, which is very common for females in such a family. Neither my brother nor I were biologically related to this family, so you can’t blame the way we both adapted to the environment as ‘genetic’.

    By the time someone commits such a crime as did Stroman, their ability to think rationally is nonexistent. They are filled with rage and despair and do not know how to be a regular person. It’s easy to think of someone as being ‘other’ — not like you — but the reality is if you had grown up the way he did, or my brother, you might find yourself just as angry and trigger-happy.

    There’s that old story about the babies floating by on a river. Everyone scrambles to pull them out. One, two, three…ten, eleven…when they start coming in bunches, one guy gets out of the water and starts walking away along the bank. Everyone yells at him to get back in the water and save the babies. He explains that he’s going upstream to figure out WHY the babies are being dumped in the river.

    The real problem is not the crime itself. It’s everything that leads up to such crimes.

  13. Kimmo says:

    Murder by the State is an obscenity orders of magnitude greater than the actions of any individual.

  14. Neon Tooth says:

    Thumbs up Mr. Bhuiyan! Now get the hell out of that shithole.

  15. futnuh says:

    To Anon #9 who writes:

    To those who would wish this man dead, I have one question: Would you be his executioner? I doubt it.

    Then you’d be wrong.

    To Ipo #13 who writes:

    When you put supreme whity to death he is not getting punished any longer.
    While his victims are.

    Human beings are adaptable. I would posit that a prisoner serving life at some point accepts the situation as normal, and experiences similar cycles of (relative) pleasure to any of us on the outside. That the prisoner’s pleasure comes from a once-weekly serving of, say frozen lasagna, and mine requires a $100 candlelight dining excursion is irrelevant – the relative pleasure from our norm is the same. My point? A life sentence is still a lifetime of experiences (some positive and pleasurable, albeit behind lock and key ), something which he deprived his victims.

  16. Laurent says:

    If society wants to have respect for the victims, we should listen to what Rais Bhuiyan and other victims of Mark Stroman have to say. Their voices are not anyone’s voice. Death penalty and punishment in general are not for society’s comfort. These are choices of civilisation. Here is another case of the actual victims showing us a way to a higher civilisation.

  17. Mr. Winka says:

    I admire the victim’s ability to turn the other cheek especially since he only has one cheek left and it looks like he may have also lost an eye. At least the “eye for an eye” principle should be applied in this case. Killing is too good for him. The perpetrator should be made to rot in prison.

  18. Anonymous says:

    Don’t give this unrepentant killer the satisfaction of becoming a martyr to other haters and in his own mind. He should spend many years alive in prison to reflect on the efforts of his victim to save his miserable life.

  19. freshacconci says:

    Some of these comments make me profoundly sad. I guess I shouldn’t be surprised to see so many support the death penalty but I am.

  20. happyez says:

    And to answer the question “would I be willing to be his executioner”? Absolutely.

    Classic. So, what if you had to strangle him with your bare hands, rather than pull a lever or stick a needle up him?

    It serves no purpose to society to allow this man to exist

    Really? Well, looks like…you have the job! Rick Perry just phoned me and said he likes the cut of your jib, and you are now responsible for killing someone. He said, this makes you the good one, because, hell, good is just on your side.

    He told me that full joy must be felt, and you can’t be a faker. Faking makes him really mad and since the state can legally kill, well……he’ll just be passive-aggressive for now.

    One last note, your ‘absolutely’ (you mean, ‘yes’, don’t you? You don’t kill someone half-heartedly with a ‘meh’) answer to killing people who have done something morally reprehensible, in your eyes, is not really containable. It is easy for powerful people to use killing as a way of control. Easy. So to you, this is cut and dry. Maybe the only time it is, but you are not the sole decider, and in a democracy, there are many other people out there who want to be the definers of the killing list.
    Go on, make them the deciders. Oh, look who’s on. Abortion doctors, degenerate artists, members of the Red Brigades, etc etc etc….

    Execution is simply the most logical and efficient way to do so.

    Democracy is not efficient. Shooting people onsite where they live is the most efficient. Amnesty International has a term for it, and many dictatorships are really fine with doing this. +1 for efficiency!

    Adolf Eichmann was executed in Isreal in 1961 for managing the Holocaust. But hardly any victims of the genocide had a chance to tell that to his face. He knew his life was over in the court. Death was easy then, and he didn’t have to face responsibility. I would have preferred him to sit there in jail for the next 30 years and go through hour after hour of listening, and responding to each one with a heartfelt apology, and if he doesn’t give it, the victim can demand it. Yes, family members of the 6 million, each one.

    Now this guy didn’t kill that many, but he did kill more than 1. He has to listen to these stories, and more, and face all those he abused before killing people. He will be busy. Then he will be forced to meditate and his family serve time (given that is where the hate starts). Cleanse the family system.

    Now that’s real mending of society, not this death machine that allows these murderers to shirk responsibility and have the easy way out.

  21. Arcadian says:

    When I heard this in the car, on NPR, I cried.

    “I believe in the death penalty. There are certain people who shouldn’t be in this world. The people who hacked hundreds of innocent children to death in Rwanda; beheaded them at their desks at school! The people who did that, they should be executed.”

    That pretty much sums up my feeling on the death penalty.

    And yes, I would be an executioner if needed. I would feel sad about it.

    Usually there’s a much more productive and useful end than that.

  22. LX says:

    The death penalty directly violates the human right to live. Even supremacist scumbags ™ are humans (which may stretch the definition a bit, but nevertheless).

  23. JArmstrong says:

    Emily Murray was a wonderful young woman with sincere spiritual beliefs who was raised by a family that instilled in her the values of peace and forgiveness. Before her murderer’s sentencing, Emily’s parents, Tom and Cynthia, informed the court of Emily’s fervent anti-death penalty beliefs and said that “Emily would regard it as a tragedy and an abomination if another human being were put to death in her name.” And yet a jury of eight women and four men recommended the death penalty for McKnight during a sentencing phase of the trial. Neither the judge or the governor heeded the Murray family’s requests either. Her killer was executed. Emily was a friend whose lessons on compassion and love continue on. I only wish that her Truth get to those in Power.

    This guy is equally full of awesome love and understanding. I hope someone with authority listens to him.

  24. Atrum says:

    I wish to give Mr. Bhuiyan a hug.

  25. Mister44 says:

    Thank god (allah?) that those jackasses are idiots and used bird shot rather than buck shot. Then again – white supremacists tend to not be the sharpest crayon in the box.

  26. numcrun says:

    He is NOT unrepentant, please get your facts straight:

    “I am a human being and made a terrible mistake out of love, grief and anger, and believe me, I am paying for it every single minute of the day.”

    But the crazy fool sure deserves all he’s getting.

  27. TNGMug says:

    The guy works in a Texas gas station, gets shot in the face for the colour of his skin, and now spends his spare time promoting compassion and forgiveness.

  28. anharmyenone says:

    There is an old Jewish saying: “He who is merciful to the cruel, will end up being cruel to the merciful.”

    The murderer is in prison where he could well murder again or stir up others to murder. Racial/ethnic/religious tensions are high in prisons.

    I say that mercy is normally a virtue, but when used recklessly, it can be a vice.

    • Brainspore says:

      I say that mercy is normally a virtue, but when used recklessly, it can be a vice.

      I tell ya- that’s what’s wrong with the world today, all those dang crime victims recklessly throwing mercy around! Maybe we should throw Bhuiyan and the other victims’ family members in prison now before those selfish bastards can hurt anyone else.

      I mean, opposing the death penalty? What the hell could they be thinking?? Do they want our murder rate to shoot through the roof* like those mercy-mad peaceniks in Norway, where the maximum prison sentence is 21 years?

      (*And by “roof” I mean “basement,” since they have the lowest murder rate in the entire freakin’ planet.)

  29. Anonymous says:

    I find this man’s compassion and reaction admirable, but I disagree with his reasoning.

    1) “he is best who can forgive easily”

    Forgiveness is a recipe for abuse.

    2) “Islam doesn’t allow for hate and killing”.

    Not true. Islam preaches death for a number of offenses, including leaving the faith (I should know, because I’m an apostate).

    3) “I seek solace for the wives and children of Mr. Hasan and Mr. Patel, who are also victims in this tragedy.”

    Relatives of murder victims almost never recover (see A Grief Like No Other, The Atlantic, 1993). The only solace they find lies in sharing their grief with other relatives of murder victims. If anything, they would likely feel relieved if he’s dead because he can no longer hurt anyone. If he’s still alive, his presence hangs over them.

  30. Anonymous says:

    We pause now for a word from the philosophers,
    A short reminder regarding the matter of payment and cost.
    Nothing is paid back. That does not happen, not on earth.
    A favor cannot be paid back, neither can a wrong.
    We say a criminal pays for his crime when we lock him up,
    That the murderer pays for his murder when the state murders him.
    But really, the state is hiding an unsightly object.
    Society is merely sweeping it’s dirt under the carpet.
    We may sometimes manage to cure the thing called crime,
    But the man called a criminal is never punished.
    He can be inconvenienced, or tormented, or done away with.
    But he cannot pay for what he has done.

    If the ledger is ever balanced, it is not by him,
    But by some other man having nothing to do with him.
    It is balanced by deeds of virtue, by unrelated good works.
    The evildoers agony doesn’t show on the books.
    Only that fiction known to us as money can be paid back.
    The true debt, the debt of a friend to a friend or a foe to a foe,
    Outlives the principles involved, so much for payment.

    Price. That’s something else.
    There’s a price for everything, there is nothing that does not have its cost.
    Joy and inspiration and mere pleasure,
    Have a market value precisely computed in terms of their opposites.
    The cost of youth is age, the cost of age is death.
    You want love? The cost of love is independence.
    You want to be independent, do you?
    Then pay the price and know what it is to be alone.
    Your mother paid for you with pain.
    Nothing, nothing in this living world is free.
    The free air costs you the life consuming effort of breath,
    Freedom itself is priced at the rate of the citizenship it earns and holds.

    (Excerpt from Orson Welles ABC Radio Broadcast, July 28, 1946.)

    ~D. Walker

  31. purple-stater says:

    While I applaud Rais for his willingness to forgive, I cannot support any form of pardon for Mark Stroman. I fully support his execution, not because it’s some form of vengeance or justice, but because it is the only certain means to guarantee that somebody who has willingly, and in a premeditated fashion, taken the life of an innocent will not do so again.

  32. LX says:

    And by the way, maybe someone can explain this to me: while this racist got a proper trial and even a lawyer who probably tried his best to keep his face straight, there are still muslim people in Guantanamo without any trial at all just on the basis of false claims and accusations.

  33. Anonymous says:

    bcsizemo: propensity for nationalist/racialist murder is shaped by social factors. If you want to act out because of what this man did them blame the american society and then act to change it. The extreme tail will always follows the warmongering dog.

  34. rambler says:

    I am sorry but I have no love today for murderers.
    This gun toting, self justified executioner, rascist murderer needs to be let go into his next life.

    This was not a mistake some adolescent made.
    This was premeditated murder and he didn’t even need to know his victim only their country of origin.
    How is that different then Osama Bin Laden ?

    I have no problem with sending this man to join Bin Laden.

    • Brainspore says:

      I am sorry but I have no love today for murderers.

      That’s a shame, because responding with love and compassion is one of the most effective ways to make hate look even stupider.

    • Anonymous says:

      How is that different then Osama Bin Laden ?

      It was wrong to murder Osama Bin Laden too. Especially in front of small children (a 12 year old daughter of Osama Bin Laden was present, as well as the rather large families of two of his groundkeepers, one of the groundkeepers was murdered by the way). They also murdered one of Obamas sons, he was unarmed and had (as far as I know) never been involved in any terrorism (other then keeping the location of his father secret). Most of the people killed or injured had never committed any crimes or in any way supported terrorism, other then keeping quiet about Obamas location, but as children or wife’s to Obama or his servants, that is quite understandable.

      The attack was not sanctioned by the local legal government, neither by UN or any other international organisation that could have made it more legitimate. That’s why I call it the murder of Osama Bin Laden (and a lot of other people). To make it worse, the plan involved killing and endanger innocent people, it wasn’t by accident bystanders was killed or maimed.

      If it was legal send assassins to kill people who have administrated, and sometimes instigated, acts of terrorism in other countries, without any sanctions from legal authorities, then it would be legal to assassinate a hell of a lot of people in USA, including both the Bush presidents.

    • aeryn says:

      How is that different then Osama Bin Laden ?

      The way Osama Bin Laden was killed was strategic. Stroman is in U.S. custody. He’s not going anywhere, and he doesn’t have thousands of fanatical followers who will do as he orders at the expense of their own lives. Stroman is one man whose victims’ families want to end the cycle of hate. It is a completely different situation.

    • bcsizemo says:

      I’m with you on this.

      The only thing that makes me more angry is that it has taken 10 years for this to occur. A decade. Seriously?

      And we wonder why there is no money anywhere. Letting this a-hole sit in prison for a decade when he knowingly and willingly killed innocent people. I don’t know if there was ever a more concrete example of someone who should be executed.

      Frankly this should have happened 9 years ago.

      • travtastic says:

        If you think putting murderers in prison has anything to do with our financial situation, you need to do some serious reading.

        You either want to enact (fatal) vengeance on this man, or not. Don’t try to hide it behind budget concerns. It has nothing to do with money, and everything to do with filling him up with chemicals so that the people he killed will come back to life.

  35. Anonymous says:

    Anyone up for rehabilitation? The shooter sounds mentally ill. The _REAL_ story of this man is probably a lot more complex than a lot commenters seem to want to admit and I’m guessing a lot more happened than a man’s blinding hatred for a religion finally turned into a killing rage, nine years after the event he’s claiming vengeance for. Right.

    • Gulliver says:

      @ Anon #54

      Anyone up for rehabilitation? The shooter sounds mentally ill.

      Anyone who would premeditatedly kill an innocent for no reason other than appearance, then go do it again despite having watched the first die at his hands, then try it a third time is by definition mentally ill. The question of competence is whether he understand what he was doing, not whether he was full of bile and hate.

  36. aeryn says:

    I am against the death penalty, and I’m deeply moved by Mr. Bhuiyan’s compassion for someone who hurt him personally.

    I submitted the below to http://governor.state.tx.us/contact/assistance.aspx, and I would be happy if anyone else wanted to use it, especially if they live in Texas.

    Dear Governor Perry,

    This is in regards to the pending execution of Mark Stroman. No one disputes the atrocities he committed. But killing him will not bring his victims back, or restore sight to Mr. Bhuiyan. Instead, Mr. Bhuiyan and the other victims’ families want his death sentence to be commuted to life without possibility of parole. While the criminal justice system serves to dispense justice, justice is not antithetical to clemency.
    Please consider carrying out the wishes of the survivor and the victims’ families instead of allowing another life to be added to the death toll.

    Sincerely,

    • WhyBother says:

      For reasons related to corruption circa 1917, the governor has no parole or pardon authority under state law. The Board of Pardons and Paroles considers such matters, and makes a recommendation to the governor, who may then choose to finalize such a recommendation. Without the approval, he can only grant a one-time, 30-day reprieve.

      http://www.tdcj.state.tx.us/bpp/

  37. Anonymous says:

    Although the just requital for an injustice is an equivalent retribution, those who pardon and maintain righteousness are rewarded by GOD. He does not love the unjust. (Qur’an 42:40)

    He’s a better Muslim than I am.

  38. fraac says:

    Slick move, Rais. Prove to Americans that Islam is superior. They’ll like that.

  39. Brainspore says:

    If there’s a better way to turn a tragedy into a call for peace then I don’t know what it is. Bravo, sir.

  40. Anonymous says:

    I must say, I don’t feel love for this convict, but I feel even less love for most of the commenters on this thread. It reminds me of some of the ignorant and racist comments that are posted on my local news channel’s web site, although perhaps not as spittle-stained.

    To those who would wish this man dead, I have one question: Would you be his executioner?

    I doubt it.

    • Anonymous says:

      While I deeply respect this victim’s grace and ability to forgive, I also support the execution of his attacker.

      And to answer the question “would I be willing to be his executioner”? Absolutely. It serves no purpose to society to allow this man to exist, whether it’s free on the street, or sitting in jail being supported for the rest of his life on our tax dollars. Either way, the goal is to keep him apart and away from society forever. Execution is simply the most logical and efficient way to do so. You can label me as a sociopath or even a psychopath, but I would be more than willing to commit an act of “evil” to serve the greater good. My conscience would have absolutely qualms about administering the injection to this racist murdering a-hole.

      There are sometimes things that have to be done that we don’t like, or that may even be considered “evil” to protect society at large.

  41. deanaoxo says:

    It’s impossible for me to read all the comments from people who don’t understand.

    Hate begets hate. Killing is just more killing.

    Love IS the only answer.

    For the ones who think financially, the death penalty cost more than life in prison ever does. (look it up)

    For the ones that think vengefully, try talking to anyone who has actually carried out their vengeance.

    Others that think killing is cool, try talking to killers.

    To those who know that Rais Bhuiyan ‘gets it’, you are not alone. Take faith, of yourself, and humanity to know, we need far more of this, and way less of that to make it in this world. War, killing, murder, vengeance, revenge, and all truly negative things gain none of us anything but more problems. You can not kill yourself out of a problem.

    Good luck everyone. Thank you Boing for bringing this story out. Thank you Rais Bhuiyan for living on this planet and standing up for your beliefs and showing what true strength is.

    aoxomoxoa

    • Gulliver says:

      Hate begets hate. Killing is just more killing.

      Then if you kill, make certain it is not out of hate.

      Others that think killing is cool, try talking to killers.

      Who is this thread has said this?

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