Experimental camera records light in slow motion

MIT Media Lab researchers have developed a camera that can capture images at one trillion frames per second. The system enables scientists to create super slow-motion video of light itself as it travels back and forth inside a two liter bottle. Check out the video above, particularly the magic at 1:49. The technology has applications in medical imaging, materials science, and also chemical analysis. Eventually, principal investigator Ramesh Raskar thinks it could trickle down to consumer photography as well. From MIT:

The system relies on a recent technology called a streak camera, deployed in a totally unexpected way. The aperture of the streak camera is a narrow slit. Particles of light — photons — enter the camera through the slit and pass through an electric field that deflects them in a direction perpendicular to the slit. Because the electric field is changing very rapidly, it deflects late-arriving photons more than it does early-arriving ones.

The image produced by the camera is thus two-dimensional, but only one of the dimensions — the one corresponding to the direction of the slit — is spatial. The other dimension, corresponding to the degree of deflection, is time. The image thus represents the time of arrival of photons passing through a one-dimensional slice of space…

As a longtime camera researcher, Raskar also sees a potential application in the development of better camera flashes. “An ultimate dream is, how do you create studio-like lighting from a compact flash? How can I take a portable camera that has a tiny flash and create the illusion that I have all these umbrellas, and sport lights, and so on?” asks Raskar, the NEC Career Development Associate Professor of Media Arts and Sciences. “With our ultrafast imaging, we can actually analyze how the photons are traveling through the world. And then we can recreate a new photo by creating the illusion that the photons started somewhere else.”

"Trillion-frame-per-second video"
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