Lego's new line of toys for girls



Brad Wieners (my friend from the days when we were both editors at Wired and now an editor at Bloomberg Businessweek) wrote the cover story for the December 19 issue of Bloomberg Businessweek about Lego's latest (and most expensive) attempt to capture the girl market.

Over the years, Lego has had five strategic initiatives aimed at girls. Some failed because they misapprehended gender differences in how kids play. Others, while modestly profitable, didn't integrate properly with Lego's core products. Now, after four years of research, design, and exhaustive testing, Lego believes it has a breakthrough. On Dec. 26 in the U.K. and Jan. 1 in the U.S., Lego will roll out Lego Friends, aimed at girls 5 and up. ...The company's confidence is evident in the launch -- a full line of 23 different products backed by a $40 million global marketing push. "This is the most significant strategic launch we've done in a decade," says Lego Group Chief Executive Officer Jørgen Vig Knudstorp. "We want to reach the other 50 percent of the world's children."

Revealed in Brad's story is Lego's introduction of the ladyfig, which is a Lego Friends minifigure that's 5 millimeters taller than the original minifig:

Then there are the lady figures. Twenty-nine mini-doll figures will be introduced in 2012, all 5 millimeters taller and curvier than the standard dwarf minifig. There are five main characters. Like American Girl Dolls, which are sold with their own book-length biographies, these five come with names and backstories. Their adventures have a backdrop: Heartlake City, which has a salon, a horse academy, a veterinary clinic, and a cafe. "We had nine nationalities on the team to make certain the underlying experience would work in many cultures," says Nanna Ulrich Gudum, senior creative director.

The key difference between girls and the ladyfig and boys and the minifig was that many more girls projected themselves onto the ladyfig -- she became an avatar. Boys tend to play with minifigs in the third person. "The girls needed a figure they could identify with, that looks like them," says Rosario Costa, a Lego design director. The Lego team knew they were on to something when girls told them, "I want to shrink down and be there."

Read the entire fascinating article at Bloomberg Businessweek (Image courtesy of Bloomberg Businessweek, photographed by Nick Ferrari)