Anti-SOPA plugins render censorship law pointless AND stupid

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17 Responses to “Anti-SOPA plugins render censorship law pointless AND stupid”

  1. Jon Moses says:

    I’m certain that, if it passes, it will include the same sort of “anti-circumvention” provisions that the DMCA does, rendering the plugins unavailable, or at least harder to get.

  2. Adam Fields says:

    Great. Just what we needed – an excuse for them to outlaw foreign DNS servers too. 

  3. wont these be illegal and punishable by something or other under sopa. for us unlucky Americans anyway.

  4. bcsizemo says:

    From what I’ve read on it, that seemed like the next logical step.  I mean it’s blocking DNS, not IP addresses…

  5. It’d make it pointless for us techy types (well, you American techy types (in America)), but not so much for average Joe and the businesses that have drastically reduced traffic.

  6. Here we go, DNS starts to disintegrate.

  7. j says:

    More generally, since DNS will literally be broken in America, all browsers will have to build some kind of native solution to use DNS servers in the rest of the world, or not function at all.  And the (necessarily American-controled) .com, .org, and .net TLDs will disintegrate, but all the others will flourish.  Basically the net effect of SOPA will be to move the control of the internet out of America.  Not so bad I guess.

    • Tyler Puryear says:

      In the long term it could perhaps be good for the rest of the world, but before the mass exodus of the gTLD servers from the US it will screw over everybody else on the planet until the changeover is complete. And in the end when the dust settles the average Joe back in the US will still be stuck in a fractured internet. All because a bunch of greedy asshats said fuck the Constitution, we need more money!

  8. Guest says:

    If you have to install an add-on just so you can continue to pirate your music and movies, you have bigger problems. Perhaps you could just, you know, stop doing that and purchase your media legally like the rest of us?

    • cmdrfire says:

      The plug-in points your browser to a non-US DNS. What’s that got to do with media piracy?

      • Guest says:

        Uh, because the sites that are subject to this law are the ones that are traffiking in pirated materials. If you need an add-on to circumvent this then clearly you are dealing with something shady (try to spin and call it ‘censorship’ all you want but it doesn’t make it true).

        • bja009 says:

          Holy cow, you haven’t paid any attention to this at all, have you? Shutting off speech indiscriminately and without due process is the very definition of censorship. Spin it all you want, but that doesn’t make it less censorshipy.
          Alternately, troll troll is troll!

          • Guest says:

            No one is “shutting off speech”, considering you’re free to talk about things all you want. They’re going after sites that host copyrighted materials WHICH IS ALREADY A CRIME. Going after thieves and criminals isn’t a free speech violation.

            That’s like saying a law which makes it illegal to rob a bank is shutting off free speech for bank robbers.

  9. Twilight_News_Site says:

    Wasn’t the Internet originally designed to withstand nuclear attack?  

    If so, I’m relatively certain that annihilation by “decree” probably wouldn’t work.  Since decrees are generally not quite as damaging as nuclear assault.

    And I’m pretty sure that I can memorize/write down/book mark IP addresses.  Like I do for every web site I design before the name goes live.  

    Just because you’re a congressman doesn’t mean you aren’t still a yokel, apparently, or the urban equivalent.

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