Uninhabited Market Island in the Baltic Sea is home to an international border between Sweden and Finland that is shaped, convolutedly, like the number 2. The New York Times explains the history behind this, one of the strangest borders in the world. (Via Doug Mack)

5 Responses to “Your land, my land, island”

  1. RadioSilence says:

    I’d say it was more like a Z than a 2.

  2. Jörg Henne says:

    Speaking of strange borders I’d say this island isn’t a match for the border between Belgium and the Netherlands around Baarle-Nassau: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baarle-Nassau
    Baarle-Nassau is a Belgian exclave within the Netherlands which is itself host to a Dutch exclave within the Belgian exclave. As the borders cut right through houses and properties, they had all kinds of bizarre stuff going on like people moving their house from one country to the other by moving their front door. Or shops with two cash registers – one in each country.

  3. teknocholer says:

    In other tiny-island news, Hans Island, between Ellesmere Island and Greenland, remains in dispute.   http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/story/2012/04/12/north-hans-island-dispute.html

    People of good will on both sides hope that the issue will be resolved peacefully. Ideally the island will be divided, giving Canada its long-desired land border with the European Union.

    • 5alo says:

      teknocholer, Greenland isn’t part of EU.

      • teknocholer says:

        I took that from the CBC article that I linked to. It seemed logical to me that, since Denmark is a member, Greenland would be too.  However, I see by Wikipedia, “Greenland retains some ties with the EU via Denmark. However, EU law largely does not apply to Greenland except in the area of trade.”

        So yes, my mistake. But since the dispute over Hans Island is between Canada and Denmark, wouldn’t any resulting border be a Canada/Denmark one?

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