Immigration and Customs Enforcement intelligence chief James M. Woosley pleads guilty to massive fraud

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20 Responses to “Immigration and Customs Enforcement intelligence chief James M. Woosley pleads guilty to massive fraud”

  1. fuzzyfuzzyfungus says:

    Maybe I just don’t move in the right circles here; but how does 600k of travel expenses (presumably even more, since those were the false ones and he probably filed at least some of his real ones as well) over a relatively short period of time pass scrutiny no matter how carefully and expertly all the books are cooked?

    Isn’t this the sort of situation where the simple size of the number throws a red flag, and a talking-to from HQ about travel expenses, even if nobody yet suspects the fraud?

    • Guest says:

      Have you ever dealt with Immigration? Or Customs? When they were still independant of each other and had clear missions, they were bureacratic nightmares.

      9/11 changed everything.

  2. millie fink says:

    Oh look, another worker for the Nanny State who stole hundreds of thousands of dollars! By gosh, we’d better dismantle that corrupt and wasteful Nanny State!

    And never mind the far, far bigger corruption involving billions of dollars, and the control of the federal government by far, far bigger thieves, the plutocrats who, by the by, fund anti-Nanny State propaganda. Nothing to see there, nothing at all, move along, plebes.

    Getting excited by stories like this one is a lot like watching the police hunt down  desperate members of the lower classes on a show like “Cops.” Why don’t those shows ever film the exciting throw-down of thieving, financially bloated plutocrats? (Rhetorical question, that. Sigh.)

    • Layne says:

      Dismantle the Nanny-state? Great idea!
      So your point is….what, exactly? That this isn’t a symptom of having a federal apparatus with zero financial accountability, instead it’s just a diversion from the larger scams going on? It might be hard, but try and imagine them both being part of the same problem: an arrogant, greedy political class who can fritter away  trillions in public tax dollars, yet still find the need to graft and steal to pad their six-figure salaries while crying endlessly about supposed “austerity cuts”. How many hundreds of these “benevolent” public crooks have to be tallied up before it starts to be the mysterious, shadowy organized syndicate of your fantasies?

      • millie fink says:

        So tell me, does that Kool-Aid taste like it’s sweetened with sugar or corn syrup?

      • R_Young says:

        “It might be hard, but try and imagine them both being part of the same problem: an arrogant, greedy political class who can fritter away  trillions in public tax dollars, yet still find the need to graft and steal to pad their six-figure salaries while crying endlessly about supposed “austerity cuts”.”

        I don’t really agree with you at all that we have a “political class” in this country, in any relevant way other than we have a very powerful, very well-educated group with a strong concentration of wealth.  When Civil servants control intelligence divisions with billion dollar budgets, it’s easy to see how smart, good people will be tempted to skim a bit off the top.  And many probably get away with it, just like in big business.  I bet it happens more in business, since government has a lot more procedural checks than business. (the infamous “red tape”)The department here is key; the Intelligence division of Customs.  They’ve gotten quite a bit of money funneled from Homeland-Security-type budgeting.  This money is often not watched as closely as other funds.

    • Guest says:

      “Why don’t those shows ever film the exciting throw-down of thieving, financially bloated plutocrats?”

      But that would terrify the wrong share of the populace. Think of the job creators.

    • Antinous / Moderator says:

      Is there any particular reason that you’re troll-baiting?

  3. Guest says:

    Oh, my. Another wholly isolated, independantly bad apple.

  4. Ito Kagehisa says:

    That’s unpossible!  This is a white man, not a thieving illegal brown person!

  5. aynrandspenismighty says:

    These thing really piss me off. This little piss-ant petty corruption will hten be used to paint those of use who decided to go into civil service as wasteful, incompetent and corrupt. Crap like this and the GSA scandal will be used as cludgels by those that would privatize every aspect of the government (while lining their own pockets). My own personal opinion is that corruption should be treated as akin to murder, rape and robbery. It undermines our confidence in our government.

    • R_Young says:

      Or we could, you know, just pay them more.

      I mean, I hate the idea of using more tax money with the debt we have, but increasing salaries is usually a good way to both improve the quality of people and decrease the incentive to take bribes and misuse money.
      Of course there will probably always be corrupt people in government, just as there are out.  

  6. Miami_Adam says:

    Why isn’t this (a conspiracy to defraud the US Government) a felony that leaves this jagoff facing 10 years?

    I don’t understand why the people who decide to undertake the burden of civil service are barely held responsible for their actions, especially when those actions involve stealing our tax money. Civil servants need to be held to a HIGHER standard, not a lower one.

  7. Marc Mielke says:

    Immigration has ALWAYS been one of more corrupt departments, IMO. There’s big money in both looking the other way and in selective enforcement, so how could it NOT be corrupt?

  8. R_Young says:

    Good job on the Justice Department for getting these convictions, and in a relatively timely manner (this would likely be dragged out for years were these Criminals in the private sector.  Or, if they worked for Goldman-Sax, they would just pay a relatively minor fine.)

    There is a lot of wasteful spending associated with Customs and all the other departments and branches under the Homeland Security’s wide umbrella.  They only have to be associated with “protecting our borders” and they tend to get a lot more money than other departments.  This is a problem mostly caused by the GOP, but there are a lot of guilty Democrats as well.  The partisan atmosphere is probably the biggest culprit, since spending gets way too politicized.  

    An instant easy fix to decrease partisanship?  Make voter registration required.  It seems to work great for Australia.  It would even help to make registration the default option when getting a drivers license: just have an “op-out” box, and at no real loss to personal liberty you increase the number of moderates who will vote.

    • C W says:

      “Make voter registration required.”

      The American Right would never tolerate such behavior.

      • R_Young says:

        I think it’s more the COP elites that would protest.  

        If it could be framed right, as a proposal from the center (which it obviously is) I think you could get enough support from the currently-disenfranchised center-right to get something like that in most states, if not in a federal bill.  

        But yeah, probably not going to happen. 

  9. BarBarSeven says:

    Leave this man alone! Without brave souls like this in charge of things 69 year olds would have gotten onto a plane with a butter knife. How many of you have been threatened by a 69 year old man with a butter knife while flying? None.  GOOD!  THE TSA IS KEEPING THE SKIES SAFE!
    http://online.wsj.com/article/AP53ed3ea70a6a42ab8ece742819ab2172.html

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