Game of Thrones S2E7: You Sad Little Kids

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53 Responses to “Game of Thrones S2E7: You Sad Little Kids”

  1. SpaceBeers says:

    More of this please. Combining Boing Boing and Game of Thrones (two of my favorite things) makes for some interesting reading.

  2. Kwame Opam says:

    Magnificent review. I really think the show is improving on the source material about as much as its forced to take liberties with it.

    And really. I crowed when Ygritte finally said “You know nothing, Jon Snow.”

  3. LaurieMann says:

    Excellent analysis.  There was also relatively little violence beyond some distant hangings, two murders by Jamie and two murders by Theon’s men.

  4. 96mouchoirs says:

    Cool, thanks to boingboing now I know what to watch on tv! Seriously though, its a shark jumper post (grumble-grumble)

  5. nmdjohn says:

    I’ll be interested when you can start one of these posts without apologizing for your interest in such normally-unworthy culture.

  6. ErikF says:

    I read the books very carefully on the rules for the Black Watch and it never says they can’t have sex, only that they can’t marry.  And yet they keep it secret when they consort with prostitutes in town and Jon Snow is all in a panic about Ygritte. Are we supposed to assume that pre-marital sex is banned as well?

    • Roose_Bolton says:

      I gathered from my readings that premarital sex was banned because it generally meant having to desert (to a certain degree) to get some.

    • Mormont says if he beheaded every man that snuck out at night to town to get some “women of the night”.  He’d have no wall.  It’s expected this is to happen. You’re not supposed to, but they are realistic in temporary needs.  You just can’t have a wife who you’d be attached to and not obey orders.

    • Alan says:

      Jon Snow doesn’t want to create bastards. He said so in Season 1 with Sam Tarly.

  7. Roose_Bolton says:

    One of my favourite themes of this series is the whole “sins of the fathers” aspect; you really feel sympathy for the next generation, who are locked into a spiral of tragedy because of the actions of their parents’ generation, who were themselves affected by the preceding generation.

  8. TC says:

    Somebody please tell me  that those two tarred little bodies are NOT Bran  and his littlest brother Rickon?

  9. Melinda9 says:

    I liked what Jaime said to Catelyn Stark after he was recaptured on honor and a knight’s vows. ‘What if your father despises the king? What if the king slays the innocent?’

    • wizardru says:

      Suffice it to say that we eventually discover that Jaime isn’t speaking of hypotheticals, here.

    • anansi133 says:

      Jamie’s bit there is probably my favorite moment of the series. All through the show we see the high cost of loyalty, and the consequences of betrayal, and this is the best challenge to feudalism I’ve heard yet.
      Loyalty is a virtue, sure. But loyalty to a person is dangerous in a different way from loyalty to an ideal. Mafiosi and war criminals are full of loyalty to their peeps, it’s the higher ideal that’s harder to swear to.

      I love that this show is pulling out the harder truths.

      • Melinda9 says:

         Well said. Catelyn Stark thinks that honor and loyalty are the highest ideals, but they can lead you to do very bad things. And one man’s loyal act is another man’s crime.

  10. Preston Sturges says:

    And just when the critics got all in a huff about gratuitous nudity (nudity is never gratuitous) all the nudity went away. 

    • xzzy says:

      Except that last night’s episode was probably filmed and edited months ago.

      There really weren’t any scenes with which to sneak in some nudity anyways, unless you count the first few seconds of the episode.

      • Preston Sturges says:

        I’m guessing everyone knew that and they wanted to hype the show as having lots of nudity before the sudden boob drought. 

    • anix says:

      There was no nudity, but there was magic.  I think they have to keep a consistent 50:1 ratio of nudity to magic.

  11. Saltine says:

    Less an analysis than a précis of the episode. I’d rather read some more thinking on all the Oedipal drama. How does Daenerys fit into all that?

  12. I find it interesting how each passing episode diverts and twists further from the original source material and manages to do so without making a complete mess of it.

  13. Kimmo says:

    Intro promises some sort of conclusion that was never made regarding the relevance of these themes today. At least that’s how it read to me…

    Also, what the hell does this mean?

    Lots of people “ship” Sansa and The Hound

    • wizardru says:

      ‘Ship’ is a slang-term for ‘relationship’…specifically in context used to mean ‘wishing that the writer/story would put these characters in a relationship’.  In most fan circles (comics, SF/Fantasy, anime, etc.) to ‘ship’ a couple is to recognize their chemistry and wish to see them develop or portrayed as a couple.

      Sometimes, this is reasonable.  In the books, Sansa and the Hound have a complex relationship.  Sandor is, in many ways, a victim.  He relates with Sansa because he understands what it is to be powerless…but he’s also a brutal killer; his way to survive was to become the same as what hurt him.  It’s clear at one point that he is at the very least sweet on Sansa and she is grateful for any kindness, regardless of how gruff the exterior.

      Sometimes, this can be simple wish fulfillment that is never going to happen, such as when fans hope for pairings that clearly aren’t what the authors/creators intended (example: Robin and Superboy).

  14. Roose_Bolton says:

    Think “relationship”. Heck, ASAOIAF fanfic even has a cutesy name for the pairing: SanSan.

    edit – oops, meant as a reply to Kimmo.

  15. Andy says:

    I grew up reading every swords and dragon book I could get my hands on. I was wondering why the “outside” world was suddenly so enamored of this series of books. I started reading the first book but for some reason it didn’t hold me. But I have tons of friends and coworkers who are really into it, and I like to remind them that any show with that many characters and plot lines is really just a soap opera. ;-p

    • namnezia says:

      And what’s worng with soap operas?

      • Andy says:

        Everything.

        • penguinchris says:

          Good answer!

          Due to the BoingBoing posts about Game of Thrones, and because I have lots of free time, I watched the whole series to date over the past couple days. Not sure if I’ll try the books or not, but I’ll definitely be following the series.

          Unlike you, I was never really into sword and dragon books. While I didn’t actively avoid this series, I just wasn’t interested. After the previous BoingBoing post I decided to give it a try.

          I’m still not that interested in the swords and dragons bit (though I appreciate that it’s very different in tone to stereotypical high fantasy, and that using that as a setting is important to the story working the way it does, and the girl with the dragons is really hot). What’s interesting is the character and plot dynamics.

          There are no one-dimensional fantasy (or soap opera for that matter) characters. You’re never sure what a character’s role is going to be until they play their cards, and even then they can (and usually do) still change.

          Soap opera is correct, broadly, but it’s no longer the right term for this kind of show. Mad Men is this kind of show too. The plots are (relatively) very slow moving, because it’s 75%+ character study. And the TV format allows for all of the side plots that would be brushed over in e.g. the Lord of the Rings films to be explored fully, which allows for a much greater sense that everything is building – ever so slowly – to something big, though I’m not sure what.

          Both of these shows are fascinating and complex in every way a stereotypical soap opera is shallow and inane.

          I don’t like all shows that aspire to be like this. In fact, most I don’t like – the point being that if it isn’t for you, nobody can fault you for that. But to dismiss it merely because it’s superficially a soap opera isn’t really valid :)

  16. NathanielS says:

    “Hodor!”

  17. anansi133 says:

    Watching this show, I have to reconsider the  relative advantages of a monarchy over a democracy: Kings can be killed, which means that in some way they can be held accountable for their actions. In a (theoretical) democracy, the actual reins of power can be hidden so deep that no one is held accountable. It’s a lot harder to get worked up about the sins and crimes of a faceless corporate entity than it is to get worked up over the actions of a King.

  18. anansi133 says:

    Watching this show, I have to reconsider the  relative advantages of a monarchy over a democracy: Kings can be killed, which means that in some way they can be held accountable for their actions. In a (theoretical) democracy, the actual reins of power can be hidden so deep that no one is held accountable. It’s a lot harder to get worked up about the sins and crimes of a faceless corporate entity than it is to get worked up over the actions of a King.

  19. Pink Frankenstein says:

    “Jaime has no reservations about strangling the poor lad in order to cause a ruckus that gets him out into the stockade.” He actually beat his face in. He strangled the guard.

    I wish there was less narrative re-cap, and more analysis. I guess it’s nice for the people who don’t watch it, but it smacks of paid-by-the word rather than paid for actual original content.

  20. Pink Frankenstein says:

    “Jaime has no reservations about strangling the poor lad in order to cause a ruckus that gets him out into the stockade.” He actually beat his face in. He strangled the guard.

    I wish there was less narrative re-cap, and more analysis. I guess it’s nice for the people who don’t watch it, but it smacks of paid-by-the word rather than paid for actual original content.

  21. I’m sure it’s just an oversight, but the new lord of Harrenhall is the grandfather of the incestuous king and the dwarf is their uncle.  Seems to say “father” when “grandfather” was meant.

    Love the Boing Boing is covering smart tv.  Nerds discussed the big issues undercover.  I’m rather enchanted that my mother is now the one telling me about fantasy philosophy after years of telling me to “set down that book and go outside.”  When are Pern and Ender’s Game arriving?? 

  22. Jose Garcia says:

    More Game of Thrones please but don’t just recap the plot let’s hear some critique, rumours, analysis. You know you want to, and we’re all going to watch the bloody thing anyways.

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