A Dallas Scooby-Doo enthusiast keeps sending white powder to churches & schools


Nick Rallo of the Dallas Observer alerted me to this report, written by Eric Nicholson, about someone who has sent nearly 400 packets of white powder to organizations in Texas. The FBI is offering a reward for her (or his) capture.

The FBI finds last week's scare even less funny because agents believe the same person has mailed more than 380 such letters since 2008 to schools, churches, government offices, embassies, all with a North Texas postmark. So unfunny in fact that it's ponying up $150,000 for information leading to the sender's arrest.

From what law enforcement has pieced together, the sender is probably a male, probably over 30, and considered odd or eccentric by others. He may have a history of mental health problems and be "unusually fascinated" with conspiracy theories.

A Local Scooby-Doo Enthusiast Keeps Sending White Powder to Churches and Schools

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  1. ‘ “unusually fascinated” with conspiracy theories.’?
    This describes everyone I know from Dallas.

    1. That was my first reaction. I used to live in North Texas and you would not believe the casual conversation about Coast to Coast that people have there.

    2. The opposite — female, under 30, considered normal, no history of mental health problems, uninterested in conspiracy theories — sounds like a good start for a personal ad.

  2. “From what law enforcement has pieced together, the sender is probably a male, probably over 30, and considered odd or eccentric by others. He may have a history of mental health problems and be “unusually fascinated” with conspiracy theories.” Alex Jones lives in Texas, right? I’ll take my $150,000 now, thanks.

  3. It’s ponying up $150,000 for information leading to arrest.

    Or the equivalent market value in Scooby Snacks?

    1. Don’t most people who ingest a lot of Scooby Snacks already spend their time running around robbing banks?

      1. That would be the Limbaugh and Hannity talking point.

        The Progressive stance is that Scooby Snacks are an aid in solving non-violent yet spooky shenanigans.

      2. Where I come from, the people who ingest a lot of Scooby Snacks may talk about robbing banks but soon forget what they were talking about and go to  play Ultimate Frisbee.

  4. “From what law enforcement has pieced together, the sender is probably a male, probably over 30, and considered odd or eccentric by others. He may have a history of mental health problems and be “unusually fascinated” with conspiracy theories.”

    Sounds like they can narrow it down to the entire Tea Party. That’s a start.

    1. Presumably the blurred last line is something that Law Enforcement is holding back, so that there’s something to either authenticate real information and/or something that happens in all of the mailings so that they don’t want to reveal so they can tell copy-cat attacks apart. Basically, if someone calls them up and says they saw a copy of that sitting in the print tray of a friend, they can ask what the end said, so that people can’t just call in tips on people they don’t like.

      In same cases, withheld information can also be used as a trap in interrogating suspects. For example, if some evidence isn’t released to the media in a highly public case, they know that if they’re questioning someone and they’re aware of that evidence, they couldn’t have learned it from the news.

      From another article, it sounds like they’re also holding back how the stuff is arranged in the envelope.

      1.  “In same cases, withheld information can also be used as a trap in interrogating suspects.”
        Which is another reason to avoid talking to police, especially if you’re innocent. It’s too easy for them to let slip a thing or two off the record, whether intentionally or not, then later claim that your knowledge  proves that you were involved in the crime.

  5. “From what law enforcement has pieced together, the sender is probably a male, probably over 30, and considered odd or eccentric by others. He may have a history of mental health problems and be “unusually fascinated” with conspiracy theories. “

    I didn’t send it. I swear it on Nibiru!!

  6.  Some top-tier profiler probably just made $30k telling us what everyone on the planet assumes about people who do things like this.

    “After amassing mountains of evidence, we’ve discovered that the person mailing out fauxthrax isn’t all there.”

    1. Really? It seems like a departure from the usual, “he was a quiet, unassuming loner who seemed nice, but mostly kept to himself,” that the press likes to stereotype about anyone who does something horrific. At least they’re going for “obviously crazy” this time.

  7. I will be very disappointed if, upon capture, the arresting agent doesn’t scold the culprit with a “…now let’s see who you really are!”

    1.  This always bugs me; I want to find out if some stupid dealers are being extraordinarily bold and seeing if they can use the USPS as a mule.

  8. It is probably some kind of animatronic monster being operated by the caretaker. 

    It may also be Shaggy, still in denial about Scoobie’s ‘big dog’ short lifespan, and hoping he’ll turn up to solve another case.  Shaggy always seemed on the edge of reason to me.

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