The Library of Congress has an official standard for abbreviations of different languages. It's a long list, because, well, there are lots and lots of languages that might be mentioned in the Library of Congress. In fact, the standard is so thorough that it includes Klingon. (Via Hilary Mason)

16 Responses to “The Library of Congress welcomes our new galactic overlords”

  1. danimagoo says:

    I’m disappointed none of Tolkien’s languages are listed.

  2. MattLeidholm says:

    The Library of Congress is only listing the languages categorized by ISO 639-2, which defined Klingon (or tlhIngan Hol) as well as other constructed languages. Because Klingon has a formally defined but unusual syntax–created by linguist Marc Okrand–it is studied as much by fans of constructed languages than by Trekkies.

  3. show me says:

    Last I checked, Klingons are not our Galactic Overlords. All they have on us is cloaking technology, and they always attack before they are ready, and are usually easily defeated.

  4. No Na’vi. Very disappointed. 

  5. Paul Renault says:

    No Chiac?   WTF?

    Dano Leblanc’s Acadieman – Au Call Center.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aGTcM4xKUUo

  6. eldritch says:

    Qapla’!

  7. Timmy Corkery says:

    Wait — ALL the Salish languages are lumped into ONE listing?! Uh… hm.

  8. The Library of Congress contains at least one text in Klingon: “The Klingon Hamlet”, published by the Klingon Language Institute.
    They also have a copy of HolQeD (Volume 1, #1), the KLI’s formerly quarterly journal, as well as at least two of Marc Okrand’s books on the subject.

    Their standard also includes Esperanto, Lojban, Volapük, Blissymbols and Ido.

  9. Brian_Barker says:

    For those who want Klingon, rather than Esperanto, as the international language see http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=8TQGVh025E4

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