Twisted, abandoned bike carcasses on the streets of New York

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18 Responses to “Twisted, abandoned bike carcasses on the streets of New York”

  1. BWJones says:

    Yes, this scene of parts of two bikes http://prometheus.med.utah.edu/~bwjones/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/Saddest-scene.jpg was the saddest thing we saw on our last trip to NYC http://prometheus.med.utah.edu/~bwjones/2012/07/new-york-new-york/

  2. latelatelateshow says:

    This is a nice-looking collection of photographs. The one thing I always find funny with this type of photo essay is the fact that the photographers assume that phenomena such as this (abandoned bikes, etc) are only localized to their particular local, in this case NYC

    Broken, abandoned and rusty locked bicycles are common in all American cities. In my town, bikes such as this can be seen about every two blocks. In other words, a true comprehensive photo essay such as this should acknowledge the phenomenon that’s also occurring in other places. New York doesn’t have a “lock” on crummy bikes left on sidewalks

    Like I said, nice-looking collection!

    • Beanolini says:

      the photographers assume that phenomena such as this (abandoned bikes, etc) are only localized to their particular local, in this case NYC

      Photographing abandoned bikes does seem to be particularly popular in New York, though- another example is a book called “Bicycles Locked to Poles” that was published a few years ago.

  3. Sarah Smith says:

    I’m astonished by this.  Here in L.A., scavengers for metal would have snatched them up in a flash. All you have to do is leave it on the curb and it is gone in a day or two, sometimes, just under an hour. I guess in a throwaway society, what one person sees as trash, another sees as resource.

    • nixiebunny says:

      Notice that every abandoned bike in New York City is attached to the rack by a chain sturdy enough to tow a semi-truck. Well, not exactly, but the lock companies sell special “NYC-grade” locks.

  4. Joe_Schumacher says:

    It seems like only yesterday.  My brief bit of internet fame was back in 2006 when Xeni linked http://boingboing.net/2006/02/17/web-zen-photo-zen.html to my Abandoned Bicycles of New York photo album http://jschumacher.typepad.com/photos/abandoned_bikes/index.html 

  5. tsoyptc says:

    Cory, I’m loving that I know exactly the two references you’ve made (I’m a Toronto bike mechanic who volunteers at a DIY shop), and I LOVE the Bovine Sex Club sign.  :)

    • BombBlastLightingWaltz says:

      Which DYI shop, Pirates or Juice?

      I use to pay people to fix my bike, going to Bike Pirates has helped a lot and now I fix my own bike and my friends bikes. Thanks for volunteering.

  6. Boundegar says:

    Abandoned bikes now constitute “abandonware?”

  7. sdmikev says:

    I took this one on Eldridge Street in April - 
    http://mikevella.com/NYC2012/pages/img_0483.htm
    The plastic forks that were around it were a nice touch..

  8. Points off for “vibrant”….

  9. DJBudSonic says:

    It’s not OK to part that Trek;  if I come back and somebody has stolen my rack and fenders I’ll be pissed.

  10. BombBlastLightingWaltz says:

    Wonder how many abandoned bikes are people who got drunk and plain forgot where their bike was locked up. 

    • Halloween_Jack says:

       I’ve had a bike removed and discarded by a landlord who assumed that it was discarded because of its poor condition.

  11. Yes, ahem, McSweeney’s published “Bicycles Locked to Poles” in 2005.

  12. James Penrose says:

    New York City seems to be one of the few places where people are proud to live among their own filth and refuse.  Sad commentary on humans.

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