Neo-Nazi MEP from Hungary discovers he is Jewish

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100 Responses to “Neo-Nazi MEP from Hungary discovers he is Jewish”

  1. Brainspore says:

    Classic. Reminds me of the Chapelle sketch about the blind Klansman who doesn’t realize he’s black.

  2. fuzzyfuzzyfungus says:

    Ooh, kicked out of the neo-nazis and very unlikely to be welcome at the next meeting of the international zionist jew money cabal… Awkward.

  3. thecleaninglady says:

    I-ro-nic.

    • Like rain on your wedding day…

      • Thad Boyd says:

        No, this is ACTUALLY ironic.

        • Sorry. I suffer a sick compulsion to remind people of Alanis Morissette whenever they use that word. And yes, I realize the examples in her song weren’t accurate depictions, which is itself rather ironic.

          Dontcha think?

          • Tynam says:

            Alanis also realises it, and is now thoroughly educated in the meaning of the word.  And is, I think, justifiably annoyed that people still haven’t let this one go.

            Move on.

            (Flicks up, reviews article, pauses to bask in schadenfreude.)

          • Antinous / Moderator says:

            Alanis also realises it, and is now thoroughly educated in the meaning of the word.

            She’s Canadian. Who knows what goes on in their heads.

          • BombBlastLightingWaltz says:

            I heard a drop of gossip that Mrs. Reynolds is a shrewd stock holder in various venues. Good for her.  

  4. peterblue11 says:

    This came as a shock to Szegedi, who having been blind since birth, also had to learn on the same day that he was actually Black, as his maternal grand father was of Black African heritage.

    His fellow Nazi party members simply couldn’t bring themselves to break it to the Black
    Jewish Neonazi.

    More as the story develops.

    • cdh1971 says:

      I’ll just leave this here…

      (Pic is from Vonnegut’s Mother Night, great flick, and do read the book.)

      • Christopher says:

        Loved the book first, then loved the movie. Nolte also did a film version of Breakfast of Champions, and I read somewhere that Vonnegut, when asked if Nolte was going to do any more adaptations of his books, replied, “No, I think I’ve ruined his career enough.”

  5. Ari B. says:

    God is an iron.

    Seriously though, that’s gotta make for some interesting family conversations…

  6. Lindsay Stirton says:

    He presumably now believes he is is part of a great conspiracy, with access to inordinate wealth and power. He should be overjoyed.

  7. Spleenal says:

    I think Nelson Muntz said it best when he said “Ha ha”

  8. Scott Rose says:

    Look at bright-side, now he can work from home. 

  9. Mitchell Glaser says:

    Why did he offer bribes to hush up the story when his family controls the media?

  10. mcarlson says:

    His bubbe is probably rolling in her grave.

  11. We need to get the LHC crew working on a tinier violin. *schadenfreude*

  12. chgoliz says:

    Hey….we don’t want him!

    • cdh1971 says:

      I agree, we, at least you and me, don’t want him. 

      However, the feeling shadenfreude  within me is somewhat greater than the feeling of not wanting him.

  13. BarBarSeven says:

    Nobody is asking the important question: How does this affect the nationalist Hungarian merchandise market?

  14. Jeb Adams says:

    This kind of thing (foaming anti-Semite is Jewish, oops) has happened a couple of times and every time I have to wonder at how disappointed they are when they realize it’s not a huge conspiracy with the banks, media, &c. The cognitive dissonance must be profound–to go from rabid hatred of a cabal, to being in the cabal, to realizing /there is no cabal/. It’s operatic.

    • Mordicai says:

       I suspect it is a lot like the foaming anti-gay activists who get caught having gay sex.  They maybe knew the whole time they were huge liars, but their self loathing just fed the flames.

  15. tré says:

    So, is he going to treat his lice first or just turn himself in for murder?

  16. When his classmates accused him of being Jewish, little Csanad usually beat them to a pulp with a menorah.

  17. RJ says:

    Oh look, scumbags fighting amongst themselves.

    • Mordicai says:

       Right: “oh what, those Neo-Nazis sure sound like a lot of backstabbing jerks, I wouldn’t want to be friends with them.”  Oh wait, I would never be friends with them ever!

    • Antinous / Moderator says:

      Like orcs, if they spot you, they’ll forget their disagreements until they’ve taken care of you.

  18. cdh1971 says:

    The Gabor Szabo mentioned in this post is _not_ the brilliant jazz musician of the same name (who died in 1982.)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gabor_Szabo

  19. ponzicar says:

    This makes very little sense. Of course, Neo Nazis aren’t exactly the most rational people around. Since he’s obviously not a follower of the religion, nor is he culturally Jewish, and since it’s not a genetic trait, the only way he could be considered Jewish is if he believed Jewish law on the matter. So why would Neo Nazis respect Jewish law of any sort?

  20. Mister44 says:

    Reminds me of Dave Chapple’s character of a blind black man who was part of a white power group.

    Here is what I find as sweet irony. Purity of bloodline is sooooo important to these NeoNazis. But every white man has Neanderthal DNA – while Africans do not. So blacks are more “pure” human wise than any neo nazi.

  21. BlackPanda says:

    They found out recently that one of the candidates for the British Nazi… sorry, British Nationalist Party had fought on the Argentine side in the Falklands War. I thought that was pretty funny, also. :D

    • Peppermint says:

      Somehow I find this far more delightful, ironic and Schadenfreude-tastic than the classic Jewish-neonazi one. (although the latter rarely gets old either.)

      • Antinous / Moderator says:

        Because Daily Mail readers regard the Falklands War as practically as important as WWI and WWII combined?

  22. SomeGuyNamedMark says:

    I understand the “rule” but I never believed that just having a Jewish grandmother makes you Jewish any more than having a vegetarian mom makes you a vegetarian.  If he went to temple, followed the faith etc that would be different.

    Still, classic irony.

    • Michael Rosefield says:

      Are you actually hoping for anything connected to racial prejudices and religious tradition to make consistent sense?

    • Bevatron Repairman says:

      @Michael – Whatever your view of the theological underpinnings, this rule makes an enormous amount of sense as a cultural matter.  If you are Jewish through your mother, the population cannot be forced out of existence through forced marriage, rape, or any other of that sort of awfulness.

    • chgoliz says:

      There are two aspects to being Jewish: religious and genetic.  You can be one (either one) without the other.  You can also be both, obviously.

      He has Jewish markers in his genome even if he never sets foot inside a synagogue.  Hence the revulsion his former pals have for him, now that they know: Ewwww…cooties.

      • Peppermint says:

        There are Jewish markers in the human genome? You mean babies are *born* with yarmulkes on?

        • Ipo says:

          Missing foreskin gene?  

        • Tynam says:

          Actually, yes, there kinda are. Ashkenaz in particular are a surprisingly tightly related genetic group, with an unusually low rate of male genetic admixture in particular.  One recent study suggests that we’re almost all, effectively, ‘cousins’ as far as genetic similarity goes.

          (This has some notable downsides, such as the famously high prevalence of Tay-Sachs disease in the population.)

          There’s still a lot of research being done on this; most of the relevant papers are from the last decade or so.

          (The Jewish custom of tracing descent matrilineally helps here, as it makes the family genetic record much more reliable than for comparable cultures.)

    • hymenopterid says:

      Judaism is a Relegion.  Jewish is a heritage.  One practices Judaism, but one does not practice being Jewish.  Consider all the people who identify themselves as Jews but who are staunch atheists. 

  23. That would have been awful for his grandmother, but they must not have been in contact if he didn’t know he was Jewish. I hope she never found out that her grandson was a Neo-Nazi.

  24. Apparently, when he was told, he immediately replied, “What is this mishugas?” That’s when he realized.

  25. Keith Tyler says:

    “When I come for me, there will be no me to speak up for me.”

  26. BlackPanda says:

    I met a white guy at the gym a few weeks back who apparently failed to realise that the tattoos on his arms were all symbols of the “5% Nation of Gods And Earths”, which last time I checked was a heretical Islamic black supremacist cult. 

    • Brainspore says:

      I bet this guy is in for an even more awkward experience at the tattoo parlor. It’s not easy to turn a swastika into a Star of David.

      • nnnoaa says:

        Actually, it _is_ quite easy. I do it all the time with the swastikas scratched on walls of elevators, or drawn on walls. :)
        Btw, afterwards, Szegedi contacted one of Hungary’s most famous rabbis, to find out what’s this whole Judaism shit is all about. Needless to say, rabbi was surprised.

      • Antinous / Moderator says:

        Ananda Marga has it all.

        • Brainspore says:

          Come to think of it, the Raelians used to combine both symbols too. But that was deemed “controversial” by small-minded humans, so the cult leader asked special permission from the alien overlords to change it to a magical swirly instead and the aliens said OK.

          • Antinous / Moderator says:

            The original might have worked if they had done an overlap instead of a merge in the center.

          • Brainspore says:

            @Antinous_Moderator:disqus : Maybe so… but who are we to Art-Direct a race of omnipotent interstellar beings?

          • Antinous / Moderator says:

            We’re only creating metaphorical representations of the archetypes that they send us, so no problem.

    • Al Billings says:

      The Gods don’t consider themselves to be Muslim, normally, with a few exceptions. There have been a few white members, such as Azrael Wisdom, but, yeah, irony.

  27. niktemadur says:

    The neo-nazis began to suspect something when, after a dinner party consisting of pork goulash with rice, Szegedi complained in his best Woody Allen’s mother’s accent, “Oh, the food was horrible!  And the portions were so small…”

    When your name is a punchline, you are living in hell.
    Szegedi is living in a hell-on-Earth of his own creation right now, with an added twist – because of his utterly forgettable name, the jokes are coming out with “he” or utilizing the copy-paste function.

    BTW, do you know what other nazi had a Jewish grandparent? *ducks*

  28. Erik Denning says:

    Sometimes these things are amusing to me and other times they filter through to real feelings and a profound sadness. I’m Jewish. I know a lot of people hate me without knowing anything about me or the religion. Lately, I found myself watching some heart-breaking Holocaust documentaries, followed by a browse through a handful of Holocaust denial websites. So much unnecessary destruction and suffering. I struggle with my own prejudices too, of course. What the hell’s wrong with us that we can’t grow out of this Us and Them mentality? I don’t mean to sound overly groovy, but shouldn’t the race we care about be the human race? fuck it.

  29. toyg says:

    And to think I was watching The Infidel just the other day… 
    Plot: middle-aged British Muslim (intepreted by British-Iranian comedian Omid Djalili) finds out he was actually adopted, and that his biological parents were Jewish. At the same time, he’s forced to deal with Islamist extremists gate-crashing his family life. There’s Richard Schiff (“Toby Ziegler” in The West Wing) in a supporting role cracking killer jokes, and the whole movie is a feelgood, intelligent take on modern Britain, much sweeter than the hugely overrated “Four Lions”.

    • dragonfrog says:

      ‘Leon the pig farmer” is another good one.  Jewish man in London discovers there was a clerical error at the sperm bank, and his biological father is a pig farmer in Yorkshire.  Charming awkwardness ensues.

  30. BombBlastLightingWaltz says:

    This smacks of Arthur Miller’s novel ‘Focus’ (the only novel ever published by Miller) where we read Mr.Newman vs Mr.Filkenstein. Great read.

  31. jahxman says:

    OK, not the same situation exactly but an entertaining movie:
    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1424003/
    about a Muslim man who discovers he was adopted, and is actually Jewish. Saw it on Netflix recently and thoroughly enjoyed it.

    Edit: oops toyg beat me to it…

  32. Ipo says:

    Y’all think it’s funny. 
    What if he had been a Jew, finding out one day he was really a Neo-Nazi?

  33. Lodewijk Gonggrijp says:

    Well this certainly brightened up my day :)

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