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MakeShop: a hackspace in Dublin


In the Irish Times, Ruth O'Connor documents a Dublin's new MakeShop, a hackerspace launched by the Science Gallery and open to adults and children alike. It sounds like a wonderful place.

Once inside, the staff’s enthusiasm finds them, glue guns poised, creating spinning robots from sawn-up dishwashing brushes and three-volt battery packs. Gearóid Keane one of the facilitators, who helps me make a bird house-shaped clock from a Gay Mitchell election poster, says that “The workshops last around 15 or 20 minutes so we get the kids’ full concentration. We get a wide range of ages but all really interested in what they are doing.”

While the target audience is 15- to 25-year-olds, people of all ages can attend the drop-in workshops. Adults and children sit side-by-side and there is a quiet sense of community interrupted by sudden bursts of laughter and excitement. Fionn Kidney of the Science Gallery says it’s about “Taking DIY and turning it into ‘Doing it Together’. It’s about developing a spark of discovery. We want to help young people find their interests.” Fundamentally, he says, MakeShop is about getting hands-on and creative, encouraging questioning and conversation.

Niall Hunt a 14-year-old from Sandymount in Dublin was making a badge – incorporating soldering techniques with learning about circuits by connecting LED lights to a battery. “I’ve always wanted to try soldering but never had the chance before,” says Niall, who likes the idea of a space where people can try out new things. With an interest in DIY, Niall’s dad John says that MakeShop provides access to materials he wouldn’t have at home as well as being an “ideas space”.

“I think it’s important to use our hands to take things apart, to figure out how things work and to fix things rather than constantly throwing stuff out.”

It's craft - but not as we know it (Thanks, Fred!)

(Photo: Nadia Gativa/Irish Times)

Three hidden photographs found in Mac SE ROM

NewImage
The folks at the NYC Resistor hackerspace found a Macintosh SE that had been abandoned on a Brooklyn sidewalk and decided to conduct a little "digital archeology."

While digging through dumps generated from the Apple Mac SE ROM images we noticed that there was a large amount of non-code, non-audio data. Adam Mayer tested different stride widths and found that at 67 bytes (536 pixels across) there appeared to be some sort of image data that clearly was a picture of people. The rest of the image was skewed and distorted, so we knew that it wasn’t stored as an uncompressed bitmap.

After some investigation, we were able to decode the scrambled mess above and turn it into the full image with a hidden message from “Thu, Nov 20, 1986“

They say there's more curious data in the ROM that they haven't been able to decipher yet.

Ghosts in the ROM (Via Matt Richardson)

For Aileen.

My boyfriend Miles O'Brien lost his beloved little sister to breast cancer today. She was only 46 years old.

They both lost their mom to it a few weeks after I was diagnosed with the same disease.

There is so much to say about what a beautiful soul Aileen was, what a cruel and ugly and brutal disease breast cancer is, how torturous treatment is, how enraging it is that science and medicine have nothing better to offer us yet, how unjust the financial devastation a diagnosis brings to so many women is—and, most of all, what it means to those of us with cancer to have the kind of support in our lives that men like Miles provide, selflessly and heroically and with unconditional love.

But for now, I just want the world to see, respect, and remember this photograph Miles took of his sister this morning, shortly before her life ended. He brought her dog Jethro from her home to the hospice house so Jethro could also say goodbye.

Gone but still loved by all. RIP Aileen Crimmings O'Brien Graef - 10/30/64-8/21/2012

She is survived by two beautiful daughters, Katie and Aileen, whom she loved very much.

And, their dog Jethro.

Update: Miles and her daughters suggest that donations in honor of Aileen be sent to Visiting Nurses Association of the Treasure Coast (@vnatc), 1110 35th Lane. Vero Beach, FL 32960. This is the hospice center that cared for Aileen in her final days. Services at Strunk Funeral Home, 916 17th Street, Vero Beach, FL 32960. If you wish to send cards or flowers, this is the best address.

Image link (photo: Miles O'Brien).

Read the rest

Science fiction of the world

Lavie Tidhar sez, "The Apex Book of World SF 2 is now officially released and available on Amazon and elsewhere. This is the second book in the international SF/F series collecting short stories from around the world, and the only current one of its kind. It particularly focuses on African and Latin American writers, alongside writers from Asia and Europe, and includes Clarke Award winner Lauren Beukes, World Fantasy Award winner Nnedi Okorafor, original fiction from Cuba, India, China and Peru and much more."

Delta refuses boarding to Poop Strong man for flying while brown and wearing the security theater shirt I designed


Back in 2007, I designed a shirt for Woot! that featured a screaming eagle clutching an unlaced shoe and a crushed water bottle, surrounded by the motto MOISTURE BOMBS ZOMG TERRORISTS ZOMG GONNA KILL US ALL ZOMG ZOMG ALERT LEVEL BLOODRED RUN RUN TAKE OFF YOUR SHOES. Among the lucky owners of this garment is Arijit "Poop Strong" Guha, who proudly wore it this week as he headed for a Delta flight from Buffalo-Niagara International Airport to his home in Phoenix.

But it was not to be. First, the TSA Delta agents questioned him closely about the shirt, and made him agree to change it, submit to a secondary screening and board last. He complied with these rules, but then he was pulled aside by multiple Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority cops, more TSA, and a Delta official and searched again. No one found anything untoward, but --

The Delta official told Arijit he wouldn't be allowed to board, and neither would his wife. Period.

When Arijit complained about this, the Niagara Transport cops got "aggressive," questioning him further and noting in their discussions that "he looks foreign." Now Arijit understood that the problem was Flying While Brown. The Niagara Transport cops had lots of dumb questions, like why Arijit's wife hadn't taken his last name, why he had opted out of the pornoscanner, and then they sicced the drug-seeking dogs on him.

Delta rebooked them for a flight the next day, but didn't offer Arijit and his wife a hotel room overnight -- and when they turned up at the airport, they discovered that their "confirmed" seats weren't confirmed, and unless eight passengers on the oversold flight agreed to fly later, they wouldn't be getting on that plane, either.

It turns out that Delta has a pattern of removing brown people from its airplanes when its pilots and passengers evince thinly veiled (or obvious) racist fears, too.

Having been booted from our flight, the transit police now began to aggressively question us. At one point, I was asked where my brother lives (he was the one who gifted me the shirt). A bit surprised by the irrelevant question, I paused for a moment before answering.

“You had to think about that one. How come?,” she asked. I explained he recently moved. “Where'd he move from?” “Michigan,” I respond. “Michigan, what's that?,” she says. At this point, the main TSA agent who'd questioned me earlier interjected: “He said ‘Michigan’.” Unable to withhold my snark, I responded with an eye-rolling sneer: “You've never heard of Michigan?”

This response did not please her partner, a transit cop named Mark. Mark grabbed his walkie-talkie and alerted his supervisor and proceeded to request that he be granted permission to question me further in a private room. His justification?: “First he hesitated, then he gave a stupid answer.” Michigan, my friends, is a stupid answer.

And then, he decided to drop any façade of fair treatment: the veil was lifted, this was about who I was and how I looked: “And he looks foreign.”

Well, Buffalo is pretty close to Canada, so maybe he thought I looked Canadian. What does a Canadian look like anyway? Whatever it is, I’m sure that’s precisely what he was thinking. Certainly he wasn’t implying that dark-skinned people are not real Americans and that white people are the only true Americans. (I wonder what those who settled this land well before the arrival of Europeans would have to say about that.)

Arijit Vs. Delta

DEVO Synthesizer featuring DEVO sounds

I've featured Remo Camerota's work and books on Boing Boing many times. He's a talented artist and designer with a love for robot art. His latest project is an iOS application that lets you design DEVO-inspired robot art and play music using unreleased DEVO sounds. They are seeking $15,000 on Kickstarter.

DEVOBOTS

NBC's The Office will end this season

One of television's most successful adaptations of a British show is finally coming to an end. Currently filming its ninth season, The Office will not be back next year, but its original showrunner, Greg Daniels, will return to cap this thing off. What does this mean? Probably guest stars, guest stars, guest stars -- but not necessarily in front of the camera. Like Breaking Bad's Bryan Cranston, who is directing an episode of the show's final season today. And Steve Carell will likely make an appearance. Was this ending overdue? Maybe. But there will be two undeniably gaping holes on Thursday nights when this and 30 Rock are both gone. (via The Hollywood Reporter)

Grow up, game journalism!

Leigh Alexander on the perpetual adolescence of game culture—and a press corps only too willing to pander to it even as it makes a superficial show of fighting it:

No wonder that when the industry’s most successful creators hear of the demand for maturity and sophistication, all that results are teen-boy tropes. And we gripe in private, but we accept this. Stagnant, emotionally arrested culture isn’t anyone’s fault, it’s just how things are. What do we know about the complex craft of game development, anyway? Let’s stick to what we can comment on: at least the graphics look good, at least someone is trying. The problem is the audience, the marketers, anyone but us.

List of Satan's hobbies was a page from a dead-on Jack Chick tract parody about Governor of Louisiana, Bobby Jindal

Troy of Cult Jam Pro says:

You did a post about "Satan's Spiritual Structure" on July 18.

The list was part of a tongue-in-cheek Jack Chick tract that we at Cultjam Productions created to promote our satirical film "Ivy League Exorcist: The Bobby Jindal Story" -- which can be viewed here.

The entire Chick tract parody can be viewed on our blog.

Here's Metroactive's article about the short film.

Bruce Campbell has seen the new Evil Dead, still swears it's awesome, is probably making a cameo

The Evil Dead Reassurance Tour marches on! The new installment of the classic horror trilogy being directed by Fede Alvarez has just finished principal photography in New Zealand, and Bruce Campbell has seen the footage! He is a producer on the flick, along with Sam Raimi and Rob Tapert, and he provided some quotes to Digital Spy that 1. acknowledge how die-hard fans are not taking news of this remake very well, and 2. to quote Michael Bay, they need to chill out.

But since Campbell is not Bay, he uses much different words and actually takes the opinions of Evil Dead fans into consideration. (Read: Is less of a dick about it.)

Read the rest

Garage door that looks like a book-case


LA Observed republished this photo of a garage-door painted to look like a magnificent outdoor book-case, apparently ganked from author Robert Crais's Facebook (I don't have a FB account, so I can't verify this).

LA garage door painted to look like bookshelves (via Super Punch)

My Geek Culture recommendations on Bullseye

The latest episode of Jesse Thorne's terrific Bullseye radio show and podcast is out, and it includes my semi-regular segment on "Geek Culture recommendations." This week, I talk about "the engaging online / downloadable game Kingdom Rush and David Dufty's tale of robotics in How to Build an Android."

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Michael Jai White, Carl Jones, Rachel Dratch and Jason Brewer

Breaking Bad art show in Los Angeles

Fans of Breaking Bad, take note if you're in Los Angeles. Gallery 1988 Melrose has a show from the guys behind Breaking GIFs. I heard about it through Bob "Saul" Odenkirk's Twitter, so it's certifiably awesome.

Tool for boring a hole in coconuts


[Video Link] Cleaning stick included. Protip: Use FLVTO to rip the song from the video and play it every time you use your CocoDrill.

CocoDrill Young Coconut Opening Punch Tap Tool on Amazon for $9 (Via Dooby Brain)

Pussy Riot solidarity protests: Topless lady with chainsaw cuts down massive crucifix in Kiev

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More photos here, some NSFW.

(Via Steven Leckart.)


Video interview with Doug Fine, author of Too High to Fail, book about cannabis industry

Here's an interview with Doug Fine, author of Too High to Fail: Cannabis and the New Green Economic Revolution.

NewImage"How can you have 56 percent of Americans in support of fully ending the drug war, and zero senators in support of it?" asks Doug Fine, investigative journalist and author of new book, Too High To Fail.

Fine sat down with ReasonTV's Tracy Oppenheimer to discuss his time spent in the cannabis capital of California, Mendocino County, and why he thinks this drug can help save the American economy. And it's not just about collecting taxes.

"The industrial [uses] may one day dwarf the psychoactive ones. If we start using it for fermentation for our energy needs, it can produce great biofuels," says Fine, "already, cannabis is in the bumpers of Dodge Vipers."

I interviewed Doug in July about his book. Read it here.

How Cannabis Can Revolutionize Our Economy: Author Doug Fine on "Too High To Fail"

For Mr. Akin, from a woman who conceived her child through rape

Writes Maureen Herman, at "A is For..." blog—"Rep. Akin, I’d like you to meet my daughter. I’d like to show you how dead wrong you are when you say that women rarely get pregnant from rape. I’m writing this letter to let you know that you definitely can, because it happened to me, and I have a 9 year old to prove it."

Todd Akin apologizes for "legitimate rape" remark

From The Onion:

You see, what I said was, “If it’s a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down.” But what I meant to say was, “I am a worthless, moronic sack of shit and an utterly irredeemable human being who needs to shut up and go away forever.”

It is clear to me now that I did not choose my words with care and did not get across the point I was trying to convey. In hindsight, I guess instead of using the words “legitimate rape,” I should have used the words “I am an unforgivable, unrepentant, and unconscionable subhuman dickhead.” Or better yet, “I am an evil, fucked-up man who should never have been elected to the United States Congress, and anyone who would vote for me is probably a pretty big fucking dumbshit, too.” See how much more sense that makes? It’s amazing how a few key word changes can totally alter the meaning of a statement.

There's a lot more.

I Misspoke—What I Meant To Say Is 'I Am Dumb As Dog Shit And I Am A Terrible Human Being'

Complaint about a pocket watch photograph

The readers of Popular Science in 1950 rightfully demanded accuracy for their 25-cents. After all, a quarter was worth $2.26 in today's money (using The Inflation Calculator). Yesterday, I posted a reader's letter of complaint about a wooden fish sculpture that Popular Science identified as a perch. When the reader pointed out that the fish did not resemble a perch, the editors of the magazine blamed the artist: "He calls it a perch."

Here's another letter of complaint from the January 1950 issue, about a remarkable pocket watch:

Congdon


Take a look at the article referred to, from the July 1949 issue:

30kwristwatch


I don't know anything about sidereal time vs. astronomer's star time, but I do know that the editor's reply is insulting: "Reader Congdon's eyes are sharper than his imagination." Does it show a lack of imagination to point out an inaccuracy? This is a cruel jab designed to stun the reader into accepting the bullshit that follows: "various dials and hands [were] set in positions to show the greatest amount of detail." How does it show more detail to set the day of the week to "SUN," the month to "JUL," and the day of the month hand to "31" instead displaying a date that doesn't go back to WWI? And the small hands could be positioned almost anywhere without obscuring details. What do you think Congdon thought when he read the response?

Mistakes in magazines are inevitable (I've made more than my share as a magazine editor, and probably made at least one mistake in this very post), but editors shouldn't get upset when they are pointed out. Instead, they should thank the reader for taking the time to complain.

Here's my own complaint: Popular Science leaves us hanging -- "Only one more complex watch was ever made -- and it was stolen in 1942 and is still missing." C'mon - give us a little more!

All that aside, how cool is this watch? I wonder what happened to it? And who bought it? According to the Inflation Calculator, "What cost $30,000 in 1949 would cost $271,373.68 in 2010." Today, the Elon Musks of the world would casually chip off a microscopic fraction from their gold pile to possess such a timepiece, but who would have bought such an expensive watch in 1949? Share your thoughts in the comments.

[UPDATE: Boing Boing reader Teaninja found more info about the watch! Patek Philippe made it for banker Henry Graves Jr. in 1933. Most of the Wikipedia entry on Graves is about the watch:

An ardent watch collector, Graves was a patron of Patek Philippe, competing with James Ward Packard, the famed automobile manufacturer, for ownership of the most complicated watch in the world.[citation needed] In 1927, Packard commissioned the world's most complicated watch but not to be outdone, Henry Graves surpassed his rival in 1933 to become the owner of the most complicated watch ever made, spending 60,000 SF, nearly five times the price paid by Mr. Packard. It took over three years, and the most advanced horological technique, to engineer this truly one-of-a-kind timepiece; only one watch was ever built. Called "the Supercomplication", this pocket watch was held in the Museum of Time near Chicago, IL for years until it was sold for a record-breaking $11,002,500 to a secretive anonymous bidder at a Sotheby's auction held in New York City on December 2, 1999. The watch currently resides in the Patek Phillippe Museum in Geneva, Switzerland, and is the most expensive single piece on display.

Best Buy a bad buy for investors

Best Buy made just $12m in profit on revenues of $10.6bn in the last quarter, falling from $150m over the same period last year. With stock and sales alike slumping, the firm suspended its profit forecast and share buybacks. Best Buy knows exactly what the problem is—it freely admits that everyone uses it to check out gadgets they then buy cheaper online—but hasn't found a way to turn the tide. [BBC and Dealnews]

Brain Rot: Hip Hop Family Tree, Kool DJ Red Alert, Jazzy Jay, and the Zulu Nation

Read the rest of the Hip Hop Family Tree comics!

Read the rest

Update: NBC wins Michael J. Fox's sitcom -- and orders a full series

Last week, we heard about Michael J. Fox's new sitcom project, how happy this will make everyone, and how badly all the major networks wanted their hands on it. Well, NBC has won this bidding war, and will go straight to series, ordering 22 episodes of the show before a pilot has even been made. Fox will make his comeback on NBC next fall, about 30 years after he became the star of the same network's Family Ties. I'll say it: This is heavy. (via Gawker)

3 Facts about bears and lady business

Good news for ladies who like the woods—your period is (probably) not something that attracts (most) bears.

There are not a lot of studies addressing this particular topic, but a National Park Service paper published this year took a look at all of them and put the scattered pieces information together into a single puzzle. It's probably not a complete picture, but it's certainly better than hearsay and random, sexist stories you heard from your grandpa's drinking buddy. More importantly, even when there is a documented risk between menstrual blood and bears, that shouldn't be construed as a reason to keep women out of the wilderness. After all, bears are attracted to food, and we don't tell people they shouldn't eat while backpacking. Instead, we have practices that reduce risk. Same thing applies here.

Here's what we learn:
1) You can menstruate freely and without fear in the contiguous 48 United States. Grizzlies, and particularly black bears, don't seem to be interested in what's happening in your pants. Evaluating hundreds of grizzly attacks found no correlation between menstruation and risk of attack. In the case of black bears, this has actually been tested experimentally, with researchers leaving used tampons from various stages of menstruation out in the wilderness and watching how the bears respond. (Science!) The bears completely ignored the tampons.

2) Yellowstone data suggests food is a much bigger risk than menstruation. Analysis of bear attack data from Yellowstone National Park doesn't even consider attacks that happened before 1980. Why? Because that was before stringent rules on in-park food storage and bear feeding. The vast majority of pre-1980 attacks are already known to be related to bears seeking out human food. Meanwhile, between 1980 and 2011 only 9 women have been injured by bears in Yellowstone. Of those, six were incidents where women and bears ran into each other unexpectedly on hiking trails. In the other three incidents, which didn't rely on the element of surprise and are, thus, more likely to have attraction factors involved none of the women were menstruating at the time of the attack.

3) Polar bears are a whole 'nother story. Two different polar bear studies, one in captivity and one in the wild, have shown that those bears are attracted to human menstrual blood—even more than plain old human blood that wasn't related to menstruation. They are also attracted to the scent of seals and (again) human food.

Big picture: Food still seems to be a bigger issue in bear attacks than menstruating ladies. And, as with food, the Park Service has guidelines that you can follow for how to best deal with tampons while in the wilderness.

Read the full National Parks Service report, including the safety guidelines for women on their periods

Via Mother Nature Network

Makie dolls limited batch two for sale


Makies, the 3D printed toy startup my wife quit her job to co-found last year, has opened its doors for a second batch of limited edition sales. The company is still working out its logistics and doll-making tools, so it is periodically opening up for limited sales of 100 toys at a time, then regrouping and refactoring based on what they've learned. Dolls 101-200 went on sale on Friday (starting with people who'd signed up for early access, opening today to the general public). New in this collection: samurai swords, punky boots, and evil-genius hand-poses.

The action doll you designed, made real | makie.me

The best arguments for a Disney park in Toronto are a little bit depressing

Over at The Disney Blog, Mike Bastoli has put together a few talking points proposing a potential new Disney park in Toronto. As a New Yorker, I, for one, would visit such a park at least once a month, since it would be impractical to actually live there. Two of Bastoli's biggest arguments in favor of such a park, however, are global warming (winters are getting milder every year) and overpopulation (108 million people, 35 percent of the American population, are just a nine-hour drive from Toronto, a number that is projected to reach 141 million by 2050). It makes sense, and it also sounds like an episode of Futurama. "The planet is getting warmer, and there are way too many people. Why not just funnel them into this park now that Orlando has burst into flames?" (via The Disney Blog)

If you like watching actors giggle in silly costumes, then I've got an Avengers blooper reel for you

It's not common for Marvel to feature blooper reels as part of their DVD/Blu-ray special features because obviously, fictional superheroes and the people who play them are supposed to be perfect. However, Joss Whedon made this movie, and if there is anything he's taught us about gifted people tasked with protecting the universe from evil, it's that they are far from perfect. Sometimes, hilariously so. And so we have an Avengers blooper reel. Watch for Colbie Smulders "trying something out" for one of her more emotionally involved moments. UPDATE: Sorry about the YouTube video that ended up pulled this afternoon. You can watch the reel at io9. (via The Mary Sue)

Diamond Rings- "I’m Just Me” (free MP3)

Sound it Out # 34: Diamond Rings- "I’m Just Me” (MP3)

When I was a naive and confused tween, I yearned to lose my virginity to Boy George. I later learned that a few of my male friends shared this same fantasy. Now a new generation of youth gets to feel this way about Diamond Rings.

John O is Diamond Rings. It would be easy to dismiss him as a post-80’s mix of Vanilla Ice and Max Headroom if he weren't so adorable and talented. I saw him play a small showcase last week and he completely owned the room by  throwing himself into his performance. He danced on tables and vamped like he was playing in a vast stadium instead of a tiny room holding fewer than 100 people. John's persona is a crazy mix of macho and effeminate and the show could have been ridiculous if it hadn't been delivered with such complete confidence and charm.

If there’s any justice in this world, this new Diamond Rings song will be a massive hit. “I’m Just Me” is a perfect summery club anthem with a great message about being yourself. Download it below.

Going medieval on the female reproductive system

Speaking of Todd Akin, Cory posted yesterday about the history of the bogus idea that women who were raped (excuse me, "legitimately" raped) can't get pregnant from it, citing a medical/legal text from 1785. In a story at The Week, we learn that this particular bit of misinformation is, in fact, even older than that, dating back to 1290. So Akin is propagating a belief that has been spread—despite a complete lack of evidence to support it—since the 13th century. Good times.

Science, rape, and pregnancy

Kate Clancy is one of my favorite bloggers. An anthropology professor at the University of Illinois, she studies the evolution of female reproductive anatomy. Her blog covers science I don't see anywhere else—the human evolution, cultural anthropology, and behavioral science behind ladybusiness.

So Clancy's blog was one of the first places I looked yesterday after reading about Missouri Rep. Todd Akin thoughtful commentary on female biology. In a long, well-written, and (fair warning) rather graphic post, Clancy talks about what we know about rape—think of it this way, you know way more people who have been raped than who have a gluten intolerance—and the way that emotional trauma affects conception and pregnancy.

First off, there is absolutely no difference in the rate of conception between women who have been raped and those who had consensual sex. Clancy breaks this down nicely in her blog post, and even offers a surprising tidbit from the research literature that all people should consider—at any given day in a woman's cycle (even days when she is supposedly "infertile") there's about a 3% chance of unprotected sex leading to a pregnancy.

The impact of stress on miscarriage is a lot messier. I've mentioned here before that we know very, very little about miscarriage, relative to a lot of other medical issues. To paraphrase my family practice doc, when you start talking about conception and miscarriage you very quickly wander past the small amount of hard evidence and straight into voodoo. And also into the counter-intuitive nature of reality. For instance, from reading Jon Cohen's excellent book on miscarriage science, Coming to Term, I know that one of the very few miscarriage interventions that's ever performed better than placebo in multiple trials is something called "Tender Loving Care". The idea: For whatever reason, women who have had recurrent miscarriages have a greater chance of carrying the next pregnancy to term if they have regular access to mental health services, stress-relieving practices like meditation, and doctors who listen and respond to their fears. But that's not the same thing as saying that stress, or a scare, or a severe mental trauma will, inevitably, cause a miscarriage. Here's Kate Clancy:

Yes, psychosocial stress is associated with fetal loss in some samples. That is not the same thing as saying that stress causes fetal loss. Some women are more reactive to stress than others, and this seems to be based on genes and early childhood experiences. As I pointed out in my post, it certainly isn’t something women have conscious control over. And so it is irrational to link the stress of rape, while awful and severe, to fetal loss, when we understand the mechanism of the stress response and its relationship to pregnancy so poorly, and when we know next to nothing regarding how variation in stress reactivity is produced.

Basically, while stress (and the associated hormones) are correlated with a higher risk of miscarriage in some (but not all) studies, that seems to have more to do with an individual's biological makeup than it does with the source of the stress. And, frankly, we barely know enough to even say that.

Read the rest of Kate Clancy's post on the rape and pregnancy

Read Clancy's earlier (excellent) post on miscarriage

Read Jon Cohen's book, Coming to Term. (I keep recommending this, but, seriously, it's wonderful. And a hugely sane-making force in my life.)

Image: Uterus Embroidery Hoop Art, a Creative Commons Attribution (2.0) image from hey__paul's photostream

Shots of Nikon's Android camera surface

Nikon Rumors has pictures of Nikon's forthcoming Android camera, the S800. Resembling a standard compact digicam from the front—with a 25-250mm-equivalent lens—the rear's full-size touchscreen serves up access to Google Play apps. But Cult of Mac's Charlie Sorrel says it'll live or die on its connectivity, and it isn't a cellphone: "GPS is great, and putting Instagram on your camera even better, but if you have to wait to find a Wi-Fi hotspot before posting or Tweeting that photo, a major part of mobile photography is lost."