Water wigs: frozen instants of water dashed on the heads of bald guys


Tim Tadder's "Water Wigs" project is a series of photos of bald guys who allowed buckets of water to be upended over their heads, while a high-speed camera caught the frozen instant in which they appear to be wearing a wig made of water.

We used a laser and sound trigger to capture the right moments for each subject to create just the head of hair that fit best with the face.

We chose to work with triads of colors to create images that are arresting and amusing at the same time. We feel the color helps transform the water into some more and adds greater visual interest.

Water Wigs (via JWZ)

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  1. Lasers, huh? Look at the main image – tthe water to the right of the guys mustache, all the way to the bottom of the photo… One of the worst examples of photoshop cloning I’ve seen in a long while.

  2. I’s like to see these duplicated in actual super slow motion.  Think there might be a bit to much photo manipulation in these. 

  3. 2 links actually state:
    “We just finished shooting a new project we call Water Wigs. The concept is simple and it is another visual exploration of something new and totally different. We found a bunch of awesome bald men and hurled water balloons at their heads, to capture the explosion of water at various intervals. The result a new head of of water hair! We used a laser and sound trigger to capture the right moments for each subject to create just the head of hair that fit best with the face. “

  4.  Looks like the “mohawk” ones were done with balloon-animal balloons. (Although I’m having trouble believing that squared-off front in the one in the post.) 

    1. My dear Pussy,

      I disagree with your implied criticism that the committees governing human research subjects allow questionable experiments to “sneak past.”  

      In fact, this is a fine proof that the research ethics committees are working as designed. 

      Besides, the subjects pictured look like pipe-fitters, custodians, sanitation workers and grammar school teachers. Participating in a worthwhile scientific endeavour makes them feel quite uplifted I’m sure.

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