I Draw Comics sketchbook & reference guide

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5 Responses to “I Draw Comics sketchbook & reference guide”

  1. nvlady says:

    Interesting. But anyone in the industry is going to tell you the same things: Take a perspective drawing class, take a stroyboarding class, and study Andrew Loomis. I think it would be a more interesting book if it covered different comic styles, cause a lot of indie books are not done in the flashy ‘super hero’ Marvel/DC style of drawing.

    • tofagerl says:

      This is not a “guide to getting a job”, it’s a fun thing for people who love to draw.
      I put in 40 bucks for the book with international shipping. I don’t even want to use it myself, but this is perfect for the “gift drawer” for surprising birthday invitations.

      • nvlady says:

        I dont know about that. In the video they specify a lot of stuff that goes beyond it being just a ‘fun thing for people who love to draw’. 

        This seems like a ‘looking to start a comic’ book kind of jumping point that is for those more serious about comics than your 99 cent draw it now bookstore fodder. As I said, its an interesting endeavor, but seems to have coffee table book superficiality they want to distinguish themselves from.

    • Beth Z says:

      That was kind of my take on it. In fact, I’m totally baffled that they say in the video they couldn’t find anyone else who had covered this material, because when I think about books explaining how to make comics, I think of Scott McCloud’s excellent books “Understanding Comics,” “Reinventing Comics,” and “Making Comics.” I understand the industrial design guy not knowing about these… but the guy who draws for Marvel didn’t know about them either? Really?

      The book looks like a pretty standard art book– basic anatomy, proportion, and then some lessons on composition and storytelling as they relate to comics. Any decent (fine) art instruction book covers the first three, and storytelling and pacing with panels is not entirely unique either– you could get it from any book on storyboarding.

      While this might be a decent reference guide, I think I would still recommend Loomis for fine art training + McCloud’s books for theory and a real understanding of comics beyond the superhero genre.

  2. PJG says:

    It sounds like a neat book but aside from the workbook aspect it’s basically How to Draw Comics  the Marvel Way by John Buscema and Stan Lee which has been in print since 1984 and is recommended to new artists by practically every pro working.  It covers perspective, anatomy, scale, dynamic storytelling, layout etc. using almost identical graphics shown in the video. But I suppose a little redundancy doesn’t hurt.

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