Boing Boing 

A handwriting font for doctors

Link to larger size. Created by Orion Champadiyil (web, Twitter).

(via Steve Silberman)

Curiosity Mars Rover descent footage interpolated from 4fps to 25fps (video)

[Video Link] This is a magnificent thing.

YouTuber hahahaspam explains, "This is the Curiosity Mars Rover descent footage interpolated from ~4 frames per second to 25 frames per second. It is playing back in real time. This took me 4 days straight to put together, so I hope you enjoy it! Music: Kevin Macleod."

(via Joe Sabia)

When Neil Armstrong emailed Robert Krulwich

NPR's Robert Krulwich (one of the greatest science journalists ever IMO, and a personal hero of mine) writes about the day he received an email from the late astronaut Neil Armstrong. Krulwich wondered, "How come they walked such a modest distance? Less than a hundred yards from their lander?" And Armstrong basically answered that they were "part of a team and we were team players on a perilous, one-of-a-kind journey. Improvisation was not really an option." But Krulwich adds, "I kinda think he wanted to do more, go further. Anyway, read for yourself." (via Steve Silberman)

Miles O'Brien on Neil Armstrong

"He was really an engineer's engineer -- a modest man who was always uncomfortable in his singular role as the first person to set foot on the moon. He understood and appreciated the historic consequences of it and yet was never fully willing to embrace it. He was modest to the point of reclusive. You could call him the J.D. Salinger of the astronaut corps. He was a quiet, engaging, wonderful from the Midwest kind of guy... But when it came to the public exposure that was associated with this amazing accomplishment ... he ran from it. And part of it was he felt as if this was an accomplishment of many thousands of people. And it was. He took the lion's share of the credit and he felt uncomfortable with that."—Miles O'Brien, space and science journalist, speaking on CNN Saturday.

Microscopic scale measures mass of single molecule

 Science Files 2012 08 Molecule

This is a microscopic scale that can measure the mass of a single molecule. The scale was manufactured with the same semiconductor fabrication technology used to make computer chips. From Smithsonian:

As described in a paper published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, the tiny apparatus is built around a bridge-like structure that vibrates at a specific frequency based on the mass of the molecule on top of it. By precisely tracking the vibrating frequency of the bridge, they can determine the exact mass of the molecule.

"New Device Can Measure the Mass of a Single Molecule"

Pink Floyd moon landing space jam, 1969: "Moonhead"

[Video Link]

A few weeks ago, I blogged about my new obsession with early to mid-era Pink Floyd oddities. Following the death of astronaut Neil Armstrong this weekend, the NYT Lede blog points to a special rarity: a moon landing jam session the band recorded at a BBC TV studio during the descent of Apollo 11, the first time human beings ever set foot on another world. David Gilmour in the Guardian:

It was a live broadcast, and there was a panel of scientists on one side of the studio, with us on the other. I was 23. The programming was a little looser in those days, and if a producer of a late-night programme felt like it, they would do something a bit off the wall. Funnily enough I’ve never really heard it since, but it is on YouTube. They were broadcasting the moon landing and they thought that to provide a bit of a break they would show us jamming. It was only about five minutes long. The song was called Moonhead — it’s a nice, atmospheric, spacey 12-bar blues.

Read the rest

2600's hacker calendar for 2013: the surveillance edition

2600 magazine's Emmanuel Goldstein sez, "The theme of the 2013 Hacker Calendar is surveillance, and there are 12x12 glossy photos for every month of our surveillance culture hard at work - airport security, the NSA, Menwith Hill, automobile monitoring, even cameras in trees. The cover photo depicts one of society's older surveillance tools: the peephole. In addition, nearly every day of the year is marked with some event or milestone of interest to the hacker community."

2013 Hacker Calendar (Thanks, Manny!)