JetBlue planning free in-flight Wi-Fi rollout in early 2013

The Verge reports that US-based airline JetBlue will "roll out high-speed wireless networking in the first quarter of 2013," and that the service will be free for passengers. Instead of GoGo, "which Jetblue derides as slow and unsatisfactory," the airline will use supplier ViaSat. Read the rest

Police chief in MA: “Illicit drug use is a form of domestic terrorism”

“Illicit drug use is a form of domestic terrorism to some extent,” Wilmington, Massachusetts Police Chief Michael Begonis said today. “It is preying on folks who are more susceptible and who need a better life. And it’s something that we need to deal with head on.” Like hell, writes Mike Riggs at (via @radleybalko) Read the rest

RIP, Ping

During last week's iPhone 5 unveil, Apple CEO Tim Cook confirmed that the company's social network foray would be mothballed on September 30. That gives you, like, 2 weeks to figure out what the hell Ping is. Cook signaled this was coming earlier this year at the All Things Digital 2012 event: “We tried Ping, and I think the customer voted and said ‘This isn’t something that I want to put a lot of energy into.’” Read the rest

L'shana Tova!

I wanted to wish you all a Happy New Year! I have a hard time with the entire 2:22 seconds of this, but it is awfully cute. Read the rest

Appeals court says Feds can't detain without trial. White House begs them to reconsider.

David Kravets at Wired News writes on today's demand by the Obama administration that a federal appeals court immediately halt a ruling that blocks legislation authorizing the government to "indefinitely detain without trial individuals, including U.S. citizens, who are deemed to 'substantially support' groups 'engaged in hostilities against the United States or its coalition partners.'” The administration maintains the lower court’s ruling is a “dangerous” threat to national security, but the court found the rule so vague it could apply to U.S. citizens and journalists exercising constitutional rights. (PDF) Read the rest

Artist Molly Crabapple among those arrested in Occupy one-year-anniversary events

Earlier today, artist Molly Crabapple was one of a number of people arrested at events marking the one-year anniversary of the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York. By various estimates, more than a hundred people have been arrested there today. Crabapple tweeted from the police van. Over the past year, she has produced a wide array of work related to #OWS, including portraits, street-art templates, and illustrations for coverage in The Nation and other publications.

Read the rest

What are Jay-Z's 99 problems?

Last December, Brandon Scott Gorrell compiled a notional list of Jay-Z's storied 99 problems. It seems pretty plausible to me:

52. Confusion regarding how frequent one should use Q-tips to remove earwax, due to information he read that stated, more or less, that Q-tips were damaging because earwax had specific, important functions to ear health and bodily orientation and that the removal of earwax simply stimulated the production of more earwax, rendering Q-tip usage asinine.

53. PayPal terms of service and customer service equally horrible and difficult to understand.

54. Still unable to defeat final boss on Nintendo’s Super Mario Bros. 3.

55. Quickly disintegrating upkeep of dental hygiene due to feelings of meaningless and apathy.

56. Navel lint.

57. Confusion regarding the moist towelettes vs. dry toilet paper debates via recently hearing moist towelettes were for some reason bad.

58. Trouble discerning which types of socks are in fashion.

A Speculative List Of Jay-Z’s 99 Problems (via JWZ) Read the rest

Scotty Albrecht's typography wood art/prints in N.J. gallery

Designer/woodworker/hand-drawn typographer Scotty Albrecht has several lovely new pieces hanging in a group show at Parlor Gallery in Asbury, New Jersey. We have two of Scotty's pieces in our home, including the wood heart/hands seen here, and they're truly beautiful and inspiring in person. The show, titled "We Find Our Way," runs until October 15 and you can view it online as well. "We Find Our Way" Read the rest

Light up arcade coin-slot belt-buckle

Etsy seller ifindustries has already sold out of this light-up arcade game coin-slot belt buckle, which is good, because otherwise I might have accidentally bought it and worn it for the rest of my life.

Ohshit. They're made to order.

Recycled Video Arcade Twenty-Five Cent Coin-Drop Belt Buckle... that lights up Read the rest

Averaging Noah Kalina's 12 years of daily photos

Read the rest

David Byrne on silence

Talking Heads co-founder David Byrne's new book, "How Music Works," is a combination personal artistic memoir and cultural/scientific exploration of music -- what it is, how it's made, and what it means. (Cory's review of the book is here.) Smithsonian has posted a fascinating excerpt from "How Music Works" that includes a riff on the beauty of silence (photo by Bart Nagel):

In 1969, Unesco passed a resolution outlining a human right that doesn’t get talked about much—the right to silence. I think they’re referring to what happens if a noisy factory gets built beside your house, or a shooting range, or if a disco opens downstairs. They don’t mean you can demand that a restaurant turn off the classic rock tunes it’s playing, or that you can muzzle the guy next to you on the train yelling into his cellphone. It’s a nice thought though—despite our innate dread of absolute silence, we should have the right to take an occasional aural break, to experience, however briefly, a moment or two of sonic fresh air. To have a meditative moment, a head-clearing space, is a nice idea for a human right.

John Cage wrote a book called, somewhat ironically, Silence. Ironic because he was increasingly becoming notorious for noise and chaos in his compositions. He once claimed that silence doesn’t exist for us. In a quest to experience it, he went into an anechoic chamber, a room isolated from all outside sounds, with walls designed to inhibit the reflection of sounds.

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Major exhibition of Nam June Paik, "father of video art," opens at Smithsonian in December 2012

The Smithsonian American Art Museum just announced a major exhibition of Nam June Paik, set to open December 13, 2012. “Nam June Paik: Global Visionary” will offer an "unprecedented view into the artist’s creative method" through key artworks and material drawn from the Nam June Paik Archive, acquired by the Smithsonian from the artist’s estate in 2009. Well worth a trip to DC, and required viewing for any of you who count yourself among the present generation of YouTube uploaders, Vimeo auteurs, and TwitVid self-surveillance sharers. This man's legacy is part of why video is a common medium for fine art and personal expression today. Snip:

Korean-born Paik (1932-2006), known as the “father of video art,” almost single-handedly transformed video into an artist’s medium through his sculptures, installations, videotapes and television projects. Paik is recognized worldwide for his innovative, media-based artwork that is grounded in the practices of avant-garde music and performance art. His art and ideas embodied a radical new vision for an art form that he knew would be embraced around the world and that would change visual culture.

PDF of the press release is here.

Image via Wikipedia (shot by Lim Young-kyun in 1983). Read the rest

NYT on tailor-Made "bioartificial" organs for regenerative medicine

A feature in the New York Times this weekend about the rapidly-evolving science of growing, then implanting “bioartificial” organs in the field of regenerative medicine, "which for decades has been promising a future of ready-made replacement organs — livers, kidneys, even hearts — built in the laboratory." Read the rest

Michigan J Frog meets Black Mesa

Ronaldthecock produced this Black Mesa/Michigan J Frog mashup as part of a machinima challenge on

Let's have another Theme week. Starting sunday September 16th and running through sunday September 23rd, will be Critter week. in honor of the release of Black Mesa this friday, Make Videos of headcrabs, bullsquids, antlions, alien swarm monsters, or whatever creepy crawly you want. Put "OSFM critter week" in the Video description and post it here. There are a couple people working on rigs to make animating monsters like headcrabs easier, so keep an eye out and I'll post them here.

CRITTER WEEK! :: Open Source Filmmaker: (via JWZ) Read the rest

High quality math audio programs from a successful Kickstarter

Peter sez, "Samuel Hansen completed a successful Kickstarter project and as a result has created eight high-quality audio documentaries featuring in-depth stories about the world of mathematics. Samuel describes them: 'While each episode revolves around a single theme, the themes themselves vary widely and include a checkers playing computer, new tools for your mathematical toolbox, and things that were flat out unexpected. The guests range widely too, from a Fields Medalist to a composer to a stand-up mathematician.' Samuel also discusses the benefits of telling stories about mathematics."

I'm in the middle of the game theory episode and loving it!

The Toolbox « Relatively Prime (Thanks, Peter!) Read the rest

If Google yanks "Innocence of Muslims," will it lose its DMCA Safe Harbor?

Robert Cringely speculates on the reasoning behind Google's decision to continue hosting the controversial "Innocence of Muslims" clip despite a request from the State Department to remove it. Cringely believes that Google worries that if it were to begin removing videos, it would lose access to the "Safe Harbor" defense of the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act, which exempts it from liability for copyright violations by its users, provided that it does not police the users' uploads (except to ensure compliance with its terms of service). Thus if Google were to begin removing videos from US view on non-copyright/non-terms-of-service grounds, it could be liable for $150,000 copyright fines for every infringing video in the YouTube collection.

Muhammad v. YouTube (via Copyfight) Read the rest

Elfquest: A greater challenge

Here's the second page of the new chapter of Elfquest, the long-running series of graphic novels first released in 1978. Here's page 1: and here's our our introduction to the series. Published online-first for the first time here at Boing Boing, a new page of the ongoing narrative will be posted each Monday over the next few months.

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