Boing Boing 

Michigan J Frog meets Black Mesa

Ronaldthecock produced this Black Mesa/Michigan J Frog mashup as part of a machinima challenge on steamcommunity.com:

Let's have another Theme week. Starting sunday September 16th and running through sunday September 23rd, will be Critter week. in honor of the release of Black Mesa this friday, Make Videos of headcrabs, bullsquids, antlions, alien swarm monsters, or whatever creepy crawly you want. Put "OSFM critter week" in the Video description and post it here. There are a couple people working on rigs to make animating monsters like headcrabs easier, so keep an eye out and I'll post them here.

CRITTER WEEK! :: Open Source Filmmaker: (via JWZ)

High quality math audio programs from a successful Kickstarter

Peter sez, "Samuel Hansen completed a successful Kickstarter project and as a result has created eight high-quality audio documentaries featuring in-depth stories about the world of mathematics. Samuel describes them: 'While each episode revolves around a single theme, the themes themselves vary widely and include a checkers playing computer, new tools for your mathematical toolbox, and things that were flat out unexpected. The guests range widely too, from a Fields Medalist to a composer to a stand-up mathematician.' Samuel also discusses the benefits of telling stories about mathematics."

I'm in the middle of the game theory episode and loving it!

The Toolbox « Relatively Prime (Thanks, Peter!)

If Google yanks "Innocence of Muslims," will it lose its DMCA Safe Harbor?

Robert Cringely speculates on the reasoning behind Google's decision to continue hosting the controversial "Innocence of Muslims" clip despite a request from the State Department to remove it. Cringely believes that Google worries that if it were to begin removing videos, it would lose access to the "Safe Harbor" defense of the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act, which exempts it from liability for copyright violations by its users, provided that it does not police the users' uploads (except to ensure compliance with its terms of service). Thus if Google were to begin removing videos from US view on non-copyright/non-terms-of-service grounds, it could be liable for $150,000 copyright fines for every infringing video in the YouTube collection.

Muhammad v. YouTube (via Copyfight)

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Elfquest: A greater challenge

Here’s the second page of the new chapter of Elfquest, the long-running series of graphic novels first released in 1978. Here’s page 1: and here’s our our introduction to the series. Published online-first for the first time here at Boing Boing, a new page of the ongoing narrative will be posted each Monday over the next few months.

Read the rest

Free, Creative Commons licensed downloads of Rapture of the Nerds

After a short delay, Charlie Stross and I have finally managed to get the site for our new novel, Rapture of the Nerds, live and online, including Creative Commons licensed ebook versions of the book. If you enjoy the free downloads, we hope you'll buy a personal hardcopy at your local bookseller, or from your favorite online seller, or donate a copy to a library or school.

And if you'd like to reward us for our use of Creative Commons licenses, and reward Tor Books for its decision to drop DRM on all its ebooks, we hope you'll buy an ebook at your favorite ebook retailer.

USA:
Amazon Kindle (DRM-free)
Barnes and Noble Nook (DRM-free)
Google Books (DRM-free)
Kobo (DRM-free)
Apple iBooks (DRM-free)

Amazon
Booksense (will locate a store near you!)
Barnes and Noble
Powells
Booksamillion

Canada:
Amazon Kindle (DRM-free)
Kobo (DRM-free)

Chapters/Indigo
Amazon.ca

Rapture of the Nerds

The Arrival: graphic introduction to steampunk ARG


The Arrival is the opening salvo in a multi-year, multimedia steampunk alternate reality based in London. It tells the story of how restless mechanical servants were brought to Victorian England, servants who had to move always to recharge their batteries (this alternate world has a different sort of entropy than ours, I gather), and then broke free of their constraints with the help of human masters.

It's a nicely told, rather short introduction to a very rich world that is unfolding at Clockwork Watch. The organisers have put on some reportedly extraordinary live events in London, and there seems to be a lot more to come.

London 1899. Steam billows out from every corner of the city while huge Zeppelin airships float in the sky overhead. Enter the world of Clockwork Watch, a place where Victorian values are coupled with anachronistic technology, not least of which are the clockwork servants - the mechanical slaves that keep this society ticking along - this is the world of Steampunk.

Technological and social change is in the air - human-clockwork hybridisation is the talk of the town; the unwise employment of science has led to amazement and outcry - the public wants to know whether Science is about to play God.

The Arrival | Clockwork Watch