Scientists analyzing 14,700-year-old remains at Gough's cave in Somerset, England believe that human flesh was not eaten merely out of survival imperative, but as a "practical and ritualistic" behavior. Snip: "The cannibals appear to have filleted the major muscles with stone knives and then chewed off the remaining morsels. Even the ends of toe bones and ribs bones were nibbled, perhaps so that their modest stores of marrow could be sucked." Om nom nom nom! (Scientific American Blog Network, via Vaughan Bell)

5 Responses to “New fossil analysis shows cannibalism in Britain 15K years ago was "practical and ritualistic"”

  1. Sirkowski says:

    *Insert British cuisine joke*

  2. iamlegion says:

    And today it’s just called “Tory economic policy”! [rimshot]

  3. Marja Erwin says:

    It’s one way to honor the dead.

    I wonder what ended the practice in Britain. Did certain diseases reach the island in later prehistory? Did late stone age, bronze, or iron-age religious influences from the continent?

  4. Wreckrob8 says:

    ‘Practical Cannibalism’ – is that a Teach Yourself book like ‘Essential Esperanto’?

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