Maggie Koerth-Baker is the science editor at BoingBoing.net. She writes a monthly column for The New York Times Magazine and is the author of Before the Lights Go Out, a book about electricity, infrastructure, and the future of energy. You can find Maggie on Twitter and Facebook.

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12 Responses to “Celebrate Cephalopod Awareness Days!”

  1. Aaron Swain says:

    Hooray for cephalopods!

  2. mmrtnt says:

    Cephalopods you say?

    Got ‘em, says I.

    (Or at least a tentacle or two)

  3. Steve Collins says:

    Oh man, cuttlefish are some freakin’ sweet! Also, what’s with the Greek titles, but English narrative and English-speaking talking heads? 

  4. Marya says:

    Oh, FTLOG— I didn’t know, and went and bought squid for dinner!

  5. Hugh Johnson says:

    The color changing and moving patterns on your skin would be the best attribute to transplant to humans, no?
    “Hey baby, check this out!”

    Yowza.

  6. Nash Rambler says:

    I must call “bait-and-switch” here.  If you show me a shot of a Youtube video with a cuttlefish over a checkerboard pattern, comment on cuttlefish being “famous for their ability to produce moving patterns on their own skin,” I’m going to want to see some checkerboard cuttlefish.

    Which I don’t get.  No, a crude reproduction of a couple white squares doesn’t count.Now, I’m not too upset, because the video was cool and informative, and I am better for having seen it.  However, I lump such shenanigans in the same category as that doctor who told me I could have as much ice cream as I could eat after my tonsilectomy.

  7. voiceinthedistance says:

    Cuttlefish bone walks into a bar …ZAP!  
    Ouch.  I had no idea the new site design had added electrical enforcement measures.  Next time, I’ll play by the rules.

    On topic:  I know a guy that started breeding cuttlefish in home aquaria about 6 or 7 years ago, to some success.  Most of the experts told him he was crazy.  The biggest challenge, like many marine animals, is providing the right food source for the larval and juvenile stages.  It’s not that uncommon anymore.  Like their octopus cousins, they live, reproduce and die in a year or two. It’s like having an interplanetary visitor stay with you for an extended vacation. Personally, I prefer visiting them, though, even though you don’t get as much quality time with them.

  8. Johnny Farnen says:

    C”thu’lhu for President!

  9. semiotix says:

    These are cuttlefish. They appeared around the same time as sharks, 400 million years ago.

    To clarify, they’re not saying cuttlefish evolved into their present form 400 million years ago. They’re saying that the cuttlefish on the screen are the mysterious and presumably alien life forms that came to our planet then.

    I, for one, welcome our nigh-invulnerable shapeshifting overlords, and would like to remind them that as a trusted internet commenter, I can be useful in helping round up other humans.

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