Mysterious docs retrieved from meth lab show inner workings of "Dark Money"

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11 Responses to “Mysterious docs retrieved from meth lab show inner workings of "Dark Money"”

  1. grimatongueworm says:

    Better Call Saul.

  2. Chuck says:

    I suppose it would be in the interest of a very specific category of conservative men to make sure the supply channels for meth remain open. After all, they need the stuff in order to have sex with their wives.

    “Remember — every time a meth house is shut down, it’s another loss we suffer in the war the gay agenda has declared against us. Just make sure never to repeat that out loud in public.”

  3. The Optimum cable system that serves a large portion of Montana had “transmitter” failure starting just before the program was to start and ending just after the program ended.  Montana has a long and noble history of being owned by corporate masters and it seems nothing has changed.

  4. John Irvine says:

    The fact that they were found in a meth house is really not important to the story.  The lede is that there is apparently smoking gun evidence of coordination between candidates and “Citizens United”-authorized groups, that are forbidden from such coordination.  The group in question is now working a national stage:

    “For the general election, the group appears to be targeting Montana’s attorney general, Steve Bullock, the Democratic candidate for governor. As attorney general, Bullock fought the partnership’s lawsuits against the state, including the one that ended up in the Supreme Court.”

    I just donated $50 to his campaign fund.  You should too.

    • wysinwyg says:

      The fact that they were found in a meth house is really not important to the story.

      I think it’s an interesting and important bit of context, actually.  It says something about the nature of political corruption in the US and the hypocrisy (and worse) of the war on drugs.

      • John Irvine says:

         Maybe.  Or maybe that’s just where they were discovered, after a non-political theft.  It’s unclear from the article:  “A convicted felon named Mark Seibel said he stumbled on them inside a known meth house near Denver at some point in late 2010.  It’s not clear how they got there. Seibel said a friend found them in a stolen car.”  Maybe the actual Frontline piece will better explain the chain of custody.

  5. noggin says:

    Given the billions being spent on political ads this year, it seems there’s little incentive for Big Media to get into the nitty-gritty of this issue.  But cynicism unit just broke as I observe that Frontline is sponsored by Goldman Sachs.

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