Petraeus: if you think the FBI has broad email snooping powers, get a load of their phone-spying

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10 Responses to “Petraeus: if you think the FBI has broad email snooping powers, get a load of their phone-spying”

  1. Bloo says:

    I’m betting BoingBoing has noticed this before, but it’s a good time to remind people of this:
    http://zfoneproject.com/

  2. magoldman says:

    Peter also appeared on this Week’s On the Media talking about this same topic. 
    http://www.onthemedia.org/2012/nov/16/will-petraeus-scandal-be-good-privacy/

  3. lemonkid says:

    I don’t think it’s politically motivated.. generating these reports costs Telcos a lot of money.. they will still provide customers with the info, but because it costs money, that’s why they have the hoops.

    • EH says:

      There are non-cash forms of compensation that can be involved here, even to the point of being a pro for some past quid. Keeping in mind the six-month waiting period for free access to third-party storage of communications without a warrant and the time period during which the FBI agent was making noises about Petraeus, let’s look at another finish line that was recently crossed:

      http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/10/10/supreme_court_telco_spying_immunity/

      Even so, it doesn’t have to be politically motivated, it can be motivated by simple power, i.e. “because we can.” The Petraeus case is a true harbinger.

  4. ComradeQuestions says:

    There needs to be some legislation defining exactly what a “reasonable expectation of privacy” is.  Namely, “anything that you don’t expect to be made public”.  Saying that you don’t expect privacy because some third party is transmitting your conversations is insane.

  5. Cowicide says:

    That’s strange… after all these years of fighting for our “freedoms”, you’d think we’d have more freedoms.  I wonder what went wrong?

    Shouldn’t we be swimming in “freedoms” by now?

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