I write books. My latest is a YA science fiction novel called Homeland (it's the sequel to Little Brother). More books: Rapture of the Nerds (a novel, with Charlie Stross); With a Little Help (short stories); and The Great Big Beautiful Tomorrow (novella and nonfic). I speak all over the place and I tweet and tumble, too.

4 Responses to “Interactive laser-cutter”

  1. An elegant weapon for a more civilized age.

  2. timquinn says:

    I have made a lot of stuff in my days, and I have watched lots of academic presentations in the realm of media arts. I can’t believe anyone actually designs and builds anything like the paradigm they are positing. It is a project driven by a need to explore technology without the faith to just go for it. Shoe horning some idea of practical application when no one on the team has any real experience. I have seen it before. Toward the end is the “let us off the hook” moment when she says the process is not right for every sort of problem. This statement was added to the presentation because, during committee meetings on the project, it seemed to answer the skeptics. The skeptics were too polite to press the point. It doesn’t solve any real problem. You want undo? you can make the part again! Norm Abrams could tell you that on the first day and you would have learned something.

    Why does it bother me? Because these people are taking up resources and positions that could be used/filled by worthy people. Instead we have a happy circle jerk of no one looking too closely at anyone else’s work and relying on their colleagues to do the same. I have seen it before.

  3. IndexMe says:

    Very cool, the video here is hard to see and incomprehensible audio to me but the beautiful video on their site showed excellent examples of what it is. Great and satisfying! But.. 1) I have a major fear of staring into laser cutters. Call me a neanderthal but I hate it. And 2) it would be nice to have feedback showing where the line you drew is, without etching it. So personally I would prefer working on a table top with a simulation projected from above and this allowing me to interact, get feedback, place shapes, animate, etc. and then render it to wood. But very cool. Perhaps it would be very useful for doing simple modifications based on printed symbols. Mountain fold here, etc.

  4. mkanoap says:

    Way to suck out all the usefulness of drawing on a tablet.

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